Super 73 scooter. Super 73 scooter

Super73 S1 E-Bike vs. a 50cc Scooter: Which Is the Zippier City Commuter?

Urban commuting isn’t the sole domain of motorcycles. Scooters and mopeds have traditionally been the compact 2-wheeled alternatives—but not anymore. Now city riders can get an e-bike instead; some don’t even require you to pedal. One brand that’s particularly captured social media attention is California-based Super73, with retro-styled models like the S1. However, for about …

Urban commuting isn’t the sole domain of motorcycles. Scooters and mopeds have traditionally been the compact 2-wheeled alternatives—but not anymore. Now city riders can get an e-bike instead; some don’t even require you to pedal. One brand that’s particularly captured social media attention is California-based Super73, with retro-styled models like the S1. However, for about the same price as the S1, you can get a decent 50cc scooter. So, which is the better choice for running around town? Revzilla decided to find out.

What does the Super73 S1 e-bike offer?

The Super73 S1 is the e-bike company’s mid-range model, Business Insider reports, in-between the cheaper Z Series and sport-focused R Series. It’s classified as a Level 2 e-bike, with a top pedal-assisted speed of 20 mph. However, it has a dedicated throttle, too.

The Super73 S1 starts at 1800. For that, you get a single-speed drivetrain, LED lighting, a digital display, a 500W nominal/1000W peak electric motor, and a 768-Wh battery pack. The S1 has 3 pedal-assist modes: Eco, Mid, and High. In Eco Mode, Super73 claims the S1 can travel over 50 miles on a charge. With the throttle, that drops to roughly 30 miles. Luckily, the battery is removable, and with the optional 5A charger, it recharges from empty in 3-4 hours. With the standard charger, that increases to 5-6 hours.

Although the Super73 S1 has a standard aluminum cargo rack, thanks to its electric powertrain, large tires and wheels, and steel frame, it’s not exactly light. With the 9-lb battery, it weighs 70 pounds. However, those large tires can handle gravel trails, Revzilla reports. But if you want to go further off-road, there’s the aluminum-framed 2445 S2, which has full suspension.

What kind of 50cc scooter is it competing against?

The S1’s competition in Revzilla’s comparison is a Yamaha Vino 50, which was discontinued after 2017. However, in terms of overall performance, it’s similar to 50cc scooters currently on the market, such as the Vespa Sprint 50.

The Vino 50 has a 49cc fuel-injected single-cylinder engine linked to a CVT. At 179 pounds, it’s significantly heavier than the Super73 S1. However, with its 1.27-gallon fuel tank and a claimed 127-mpg fuel rating, it has a longer powered range. And its instrument cluster includes a fuel gauge.

Unlike the e-bike, the Yamaha 50cc scooter has drum brakes and lacks LED lights. But it has more wind protection, as well as under-seat storage in addition to a luggage rack.

What’s it like to ride a Super73 S1 vs. a 50cc scooter around the city?

A classic pick is the Honda Ruckus, which starts at 2749. It has a 49cc carbureted single-cylinder engine with a one-speed automatic transmission, so no need to shift. It’s also a belt-driven scooter, so it requires less maintenance. Though with a 194-lb curb weight, it’s heavier than the Vino.

If you want Vino-esque styling, but don’t want to pony up to a Super Cub, there’s the Honda Metropolitan. At 2499 it’s noticeably cheaper than the Vespa and Piaggio scooters it apes, Cycle World reports. And while it has a 49cc single-cylinder engine like the Ruckus, this scooter has fuel injection. It’s also 15 pounds lighter than Ruckus and offers a cargo/bag hook and under-seat storage.

On the e-bike side, if you’re looking for a lighter Super73 S1 alternative, there’s the 35-lb Propella 7-Speed. With a 1099 starting price, it’s also cheaper. It has a smaller 252-Wh battery and its motor peaks at ‘just’ 350W. However, it’s still good for a 20-40-mile range. The previous-gen model is also a Bicycling recommendation.

Another Bicycling recommended e-bike is the Rad Power RadWagon4 cargo bike. At 77 pounds, this 1600 e-bike is heavier than the Super73 S1. However, it has a higher payload capacity, a larger rear rack, and the ability to fit running boards for extra cargo space.

It has mechanical rather than hydraulic Tektro disc brakes. But it also has a 7-speed drivetrain, not a single-speed one. And its 750W motor and 672-Wh battery give a claimed range of over 45 miles. Plus, like the S1, it has integrated lights and both a throttle and multiple pedal-assist modes.

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Super 73 ZX E-Bike Rocks Your Ride With One Gear, All Muscle, Fun — CleanTechnica Review

All dressed up and anywhere to go: ZX e-bike from Super73 makes you want to find any excuse to go somewhere.

Read a few reviews about the new ZX e-bike from the company Super73, and you can probably pick out who is new to the e-bike experience and who is not. With that in mind, here are some thoughts on a powerful personal mobility device that commands much respect and gives much pleasure.

Does This E-Bike Go Up Hills?

Good question! This question seems to pop up all over the Intertubes. Can the ZX pedal-assist electric bike from Super73 go up hills? Find out for yourself by taking it on a spin.

If you’re accustomed to multiple gears, you can anticipate a different kind of ride with the standard Super73 ZX. It has just one 16-tooth rear cog gear to play around with (a 10-speed version is optional), so if this is your first time on a single-speed bike since training wheels, your best bet is to build a relationship with the bike. It’s sure going to be worth it.

My ZX arrived in a cardboard box and was easy to assemble. After a quick spin around a parking lot I took it on my regular 20-mile commute to work, which consists of a series of low, high, and steep hills followed by more of the same. Incredibly, the ZX sailed up most of them with the power mode set to zero on that one gear. Either I’m in better shape than I thought, or magic is happening.

Part of the difference could be the seat design. It humps up at the rear, which lets you put some extra muscle into your legwork.

To be clear, it was a much more vigorous workout/commute than I get with my everyday e-bike of 7 gears and 3 power modes, so if that’s the relationship you’re looking for, go for it.

For steeper hills, you can use whatever power mode is street-legal in your jurisdiction to give you a bit of an extra kick without breaking a sweat. After zero comes one, two, and three, and then there is a secret 4th mode which is really not a secret, but you have to really want it to get it.

I did find it difficult to feel the boost going up the first couple of hills, which could be where all those questions about going up hills come from. However, after a mile or so I figured out how to modulate my pedaling to get the most out of the power settings. Setting number one was enough to top off most of the hills, and I called upon two and three as needed.

Does The Super73 ZX E-Bike Throttle Obey Your Commands?

Power modes or not, the throttle definitely came in handy for some of those hills, including an actual mountain (well, that’s what they call it around here) that pops up at mile 18 of my round trip and would probably kill me on a conventional bicycle. The motor on this e-bike is ripped at 750 watt nominal/1350 watt peak, so hitting the throttle gave me more than enough juice to get up and over without having to pull off end-of-commute feats of strength and endurance.

As for why you need a throttle on an e-bike, you don’t necessarily need a throttle, especially not if you live in an area without hills. I do have hills, and I find a throttle very useful on a long urban/suburban commute, especially one with no bike lanes.

Aside from topping off hills, the throttle can give you a running start on traffic after stopping at an intersection on an uphill climb, get you through an intersection on the green light before a car turns into your path, or scoot you across big, wide multi-lane intersection before things get hairy.

The throttle on this e-bike is super-responsive, which could be where some of those questions about throttle behavior come from. If the Super73 ZX is going to be your first ever e-bike, you might want to prepare by getting a few minutes of practice on an e-bike that packs a bit less punch.

Otherwise, remember the Simon Cowell rule: respect the beast. The ZX has a thumb-style throttle, which is super fun to play around with, but if you have a lead thumb (lead as in Pb, the heavy metal), you’re going to be in for a surprise. Play around with the throttle on level ground for a few minutes and go soft before going hard.

I did experience one hitch on my first commute, when the throttle wouldn’t engage at the beginning of the return ride. Not sure what happened there, but shutting off the battery for a few seconds fixed the problem and it never happened again.

The opposite thing happened on the second day. I hit the throttle coming out of the driveway from the office just to make sure it would engage, and it seemed to respond with more juice than I intended. On reflection, though, that was probably just my thumb over-compensating for the previous day. I played around with the throttle for the whole 11-mile ride home and the issue never popped up again.

What About The Fun?

The coolest and funnest thing about this e-bike is getting to feel, well, cool, on a sporty-looking bike without blowing a ton of cash on a sporty-looking car.

Since sporty goes along with feelings of freedom, Super73 made a great choice of interface for the ZX. Instead of a big squared-off display it’s a discrete, tiny little round button on the handlebar, so you get the connectivity without having the connectivity in your face.

The coolest thing about the round display is the battery life indicator, which is a thin line encircling the rim of the display. It gives you a lot more nuance than conventional indicators that only give you a number of bars and you think you’re okay until all of a sudden you’re down to one bar and it’s winking at you.

The Super73 ZX gets great reviews for comfort, and it’s all true. The big soft seat, super cushy suspension, and ultra-fat tires are all pulling for you to cruise over potholes without a hitch, and the tilt-able handlebar gives you plenty of room to adjust your posture.

It’s also light for its size, thanks to an aluminum alloy frame.

As for safety features, I had a chance to check out the mechanical 160/160mm rotors when the pickup truck ahead of me suddenly came to a full stop at a Yield sign for no reason while hogging the curb. I didn’t have time to think about bailing onto the sidewalk or landing in the back of the truck, I just hit the brakes (spoiler alert: they worked).

The light kit comes extra, but if you have a set of removable strap-on lights, those will do the trick, and the curved bar behind the seat is a perfect spot for your rear light.

E-bikes: Compare Contrast

After spending a few minutes on the Super73 ZX, I missed my workaday ride with the seven gears. However, after a few more minutes, I didn’t miss a thing. The ZX is fun, all right. After the first 20-mile commute, I couldn’t wait to get back on and do another 20 miles, only better.

There was time for a third ride before sending the bike back, but by then it was the weekend, it was raining, and fenders are not included with the standard ZX. But I really wanted to see if another ride would be even better than the first two.

It was meant to be, because the rain slacked off to practically nothing by the time I got on the road. Instead of heading for the office, I did a 15-mile loop along a winding road that winds up and down that mountain, most of which is a nature preserve.

With almost no traffic to dodge and just a couple of small intersections along the way, that ride was so much fun I forgot to remember anything about it.

All in all, after spending 55 miles or so getting to know the Super73 ZX e-bike, I’m ready for more.

Read more about my 1,000 miles of commuting (and a bit of errand-running) by electric bicycle along busy urban and suburban roads with no bike lanes along with other test rides at CleanTechnica.

Photo: Super73 ZX e-bike with rider dressed for 20-mile round trip to office with no bike lanes (via Tina Casey).

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Former Tesla Battery Expert Leading Lyten Into New Lithium-Sulfur Battery Era — Podcast:

I don’t like paywalls. You don’t like paywalls. Who likes paywalls? Here at CleanTechnica, we implemented a limited paywall for a while, but it always felt wrong — and it was always tough to decide what we should put behind there. In theory, your most exclusive and best content goes behind a paywall. But then fewer people read it! We just don’t like paywalls, and so we’ve decided to ditch ours.Unfortunately, the media business is still a tough, cut-throat business with tiny margins. It’s a never-ending Olympic challenge to stay above water or even perhaps — gasp — grow. So.

If you like what we do and want to support us, please chip in a bit monthly via PayPal or Patreon to help our team do what we do!Thank you! Advertisement ‌

Tina specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Views expressed are her own. Follow her on @TinaMCasey and Spoutible.

Copyright © 2023 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and Комментарии и мнения владельцев published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.

Super 73 ZX E-Bike Rocks Your Ride With One Gear, All Muscle, Fun — CleanTechnica Review

All dressed up and anywhere to go: ZX e-bike from Super73 makes you want to find any excuse to go somewhere.

Read a few reviews about the new ZX e-bike from the company Super73, and you can probably pick out who is new to the e-bike experience and who is not. With that in mind, here are some thoughts on a powerful personal mobility device that commands much respect and gives much pleasure.

Does This E-Bike Go Up Hills?

Good question! This question seems to pop up all over the Intertubes. Can the ZX pedal-assist electric bike from Super73 go up hills? Find out for yourself by taking it on a spin.

If you’re accustomed to multiple gears, you can anticipate a different kind of ride with the standard Super73 ZX. It has just one 16-tooth rear cog gear to play around with (a 10-speed version is optional), so if this is your first time on a single-speed bike since training wheels, your best bet is to build a relationship with the bike. It’s sure going to be worth it.

My ZX arrived in a cardboard box and was easy to assemble. After a quick spin around a parking lot I took it on my regular 20-mile commute to work, which consists of a series of low, high, and steep hills followed by more of the same. Incredibly, the ZX sailed up most of them with the power mode set to zero on that one gear. Either I’m in better shape than I thought, or magic is happening.

Part of the difference could be the seat design. It humps up at the rear, which lets you put some extra muscle into your legwork.

super, scooter

To be clear, it was a much more vigorous workout/commute than I get with my everyday e-bike of 7 gears and 3 power modes, so if that’s the relationship you’re looking for, go for it.

For steeper hills, you can use whatever power mode is street-legal in your jurisdiction to give you a bit of an extra kick without breaking a sweat. After zero comes one, two, and three, and then there is a secret 4th mode which is really not a secret, but you have to really want it to get it.

I did find it difficult to feel the boost going up the first couple of hills, which could be where all those questions about going up hills come from. However, after a mile or so I figured out how to modulate my pedaling to get the most out of the power settings. Setting number one was enough to top off most of the hills, and I called upon two and three as needed.

Does The Super73 ZX E-Bike Throttle Obey Your Commands?

Power modes or not, the throttle definitely came in handy for some of those hills, including an actual mountain (well, that’s what they call it around here) that pops up at mile 18 of my round trip and would probably kill me on a conventional bicycle. The motor on this e-bike is ripped at 750 watt nominal/1350 watt peak, so hitting the throttle gave me more than enough juice to get up and over without having to pull off end-of-commute feats of strength and endurance.

As for why you need a throttle on an e-bike, you don’t necessarily need a throttle, especially not if you live in an area without hills. I do have hills, and I find a throttle very useful on a long urban/suburban commute, especially one with no bike lanes.

Aside from topping off hills, the throttle can give you a running start on traffic after stopping at an intersection on an uphill climb, get you through an intersection on the green light before a car turns into your path, or scoot you across big, wide multi-lane intersection before things get hairy.

The throttle on this e-bike is super-responsive, which could be where some of those questions about throttle behavior come from. If the Super73 ZX is going to be your first ever e-bike, you might want to prepare by getting a few minutes of practice on an e-bike that packs a bit less punch.

Otherwise, remember the Simon Cowell rule: respect the beast. The ZX has a thumb-style throttle, which is super fun to play around with, but if you have a lead thumb (lead as in Pb, the heavy metal), you’re going to be in for a surprise. Play around with the throttle on level ground for a few minutes and go soft before going hard.

I did experience one hitch on my first commute, when the throttle wouldn’t engage at the beginning of the return ride. Not sure what happened there, but shutting off the battery for a few seconds fixed the problem and it never happened again.

The opposite thing happened on the second day. I hit the throttle coming out of the driveway from the office just to make sure it would engage, and it seemed to respond with more juice than I intended. On reflection, though, that was probably just my thumb over-compensating for the previous day. I played around with the throttle for the whole 11-mile ride home and the issue never popped up again.

What About The Fun?

The coolest and funnest thing about this e-bike is getting to feel, well, cool, on a sporty-looking bike without blowing a ton of cash on a sporty-looking car.

super, scooter

Since sporty goes along with feelings of freedom, Super73 made a great choice of interface for the ZX. Instead of a big squared-off display it’s a discrete, tiny little round button on the handlebar, so you get the connectivity without having the connectivity in your face.

The coolest thing about the round display is the battery life indicator, which is a thin line encircling the rim of the display. It gives you a lot more nuance than conventional indicators that only give you a number of bars and you think you’re okay until all of a sudden you’re down to one bar and it’s winking at you.

The Super73 ZX gets great reviews for comfort, and it’s all true. The big soft seat, super cushy suspension, and ultra-fat tires are all pulling for you to cruise over potholes without a hitch, and the tilt-able handlebar gives you plenty of room to adjust your posture.

It’s also light for its size, thanks to an aluminum alloy frame.

As for safety features, I had a chance to check out the mechanical 160/160mm rotors when the pickup truck ahead of me suddenly came to a full stop at a Yield sign for no reason while hogging the curb. I didn’t have time to think about bailing onto the sidewalk or landing in the back of the truck, I just hit the brakes (spoiler alert: they worked).

The light kit comes extra, but if you have a set of removable strap-on lights, those will do the trick, and the curved bar behind the seat is a perfect spot for your rear light.

E-bikes: Compare Contrast

After spending a few minutes on the Super73 ZX, I missed my workaday ride with the seven gears. However, after a few more minutes, I didn’t miss a thing. The ZX is fun, all right. After the first 20-mile commute, I couldn’t wait to get back on and do another 20 miles, only better.

There was time for a third ride before sending the bike back, but by then it was the weekend, it was raining, and fenders are not included with the standard ZX. But I really wanted to see if another ride would be even better than the first two.

It was meant to be, because the rain slacked off to practically nothing by the time I got on the road. Instead of heading for the office, I did a 15-mile loop along a winding road that winds up and down that mountain, most of which is a nature preserve.

With almost no traffic to dodge and just a couple of small intersections along the way, that ride was so much fun I forgot to remember anything about it.

All in all, after spending 55 miles or so getting to know the Super73 ZX e-bike, I’m ready for more.

Read more about my 1,000 miles of commuting (and a bit of errand-running) by electric bicycle along busy urban and suburban roads with no bike lanes along with other test rides at CleanTechnica.

Photo: Super73 ZX e-bike with rider dressed for 20-mile round trip to office with no bike lanes (via Tina Casey).

Sign up for daily news updates from CleanTechnica on email. Or follow us on Google News! Have a tip for CleanTechnica, want to advertise, or want to suggest a guest for our CleanTech Talk podcast? Contact us here.

Former Tesla Battery Expert Leading Lyten Into New Lithium-Sulfur Battery Era — Podcast:

I don’t like paywalls. You don’t like paywalls. Who likes paywalls? Here at CleanTechnica, we implemented a limited paywall for a while, but it always felt wrong — and it was always tough to decide what we should put behind there. In theory, your most exclusive and best content goes behind a paywall. But then fewer people read it! We just don’t like paywalls, and so we’ve decided to ditch ours.Unfortunately, the media business is still a tough, cut-throat business with tiny margins. It’s a never-ending Olympic challenge to stay above water or even perhaps — gasp — grow. So.

If you like what we do and want to support us, please chip in a bit monthly via PayPal or Patreon to help our team do what we do!Thank you! Advertisement ‌

Tina specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Views expressed are her own. Follow her on @TinaMCasey and Spoutible.

Copyright © 2023 CleanTechnica. The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and Комментарии и мнения владельцев published on this site may not be sanctioned by and do not necessarily represent the views of CleanTechnica, its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.

Could this be the motorized two-wheeler to usher in the next generation of riders?

The e-mobility game has been heating up for a while now (literally in the case of those spontaneously combusting “hoverboards”), and I’ve been seeing more and more people on e-bikes around town and down at the beach with a fairly significant increase in the past couple of years. On the way back from some pedal-pushing of my own during lunch (#musclesnotmotors), I saw a couple of kids two up on an e-bike that looked similar to a Super73, but was not. It was a glance into what unadulterated freedom must feel like for two 13-year-olds: the boy piloting the machine sans shirt, but with a helmet, and a girl standing up on the passenger footpegs, hair flowing in the wind, both laughing and smiling, not a care in the world. Meanwhile, I hurried home to crawl back into my dark, dank office with hopes that my tyrannical editor hadn’t noticed my time away from the screen.

– Sighs

Jumping onto the Super73-R Brooklyn kind of makes me feel something close to what I imagine all the cool California surfer groms motoring around on e-bikes down at the beach feel. Mentally, it brings me back to a time where I would just ride my bike around for no reason, looking to explore new places and get into trouble while doing so, all for the thrill of it. Knowing that I don’t have to rely solely on my own power while doing so makes me want to swing a leg over the S73 more often, too.

The build quality seems pretty solid from my brief time with the Brooklyn. There are also nice little details throughout like the “73” cutouts on the subframe and wheels.

Super73, an Irvine, California-based company, has definitely taken the more stylish approach to the e-bike craze with its rear hub-based motor-propelled cycles and its California surfer/moto vintage lifestyle brand marketing. The company’s line-up now includes 11 models spaced apart through three categories (the R, S, and Z-series) that have varying levels of performance.

Super73-R Brooklyn

The Brooklyn model that I got to test falls into the company’s higher-end R-Series, which all include front and rear suspension, a thumb throttle and four levels of pedal-assist, and the ability to change between Classes 1, 2, and 3 as well as a full-power Off-road mode. The 48v 20ah battery/tank is said to last upwards of 75 miles under Class 1 use, and it puts power through a 750w nominal/1200w peak (in Classes 1, 2, and 3) motor that can reach 1200w nominal/2300w peak in Off-road mode. The Brooklyn also features Bluetooth connectivity with the Super73 app, a digital display, and a headlight and taillight/brake light that can be switched on or off at will as well as a fairly loud horn.

The fat LZRD tires that are said to be equipped for “peak city and street riding” are stuffed with tubes and wrapped around 20-inch spoked and bespoked (they’ve got the number 73 stamped into them) wheels.

The 32-inch seat height feels manageable thanks to its thin seat, and the 81-pound curb weight listed on the MO scales was surprising, I expected less. Tektro provides the hydraulic braking system, front and rear. Super73’s R-series bikes also come with a one-year limited warranty that covers most of the bike with a two-year warranty for the battery. However, only the original retail purchaser is covered under said warranty, so if you sell it six months later, the new owner will not have any warranty coverage.

Wife loves it, dog loves it, kids love it

My first rip on the Brooklyn was during a morning walk with my wife and our new-to-us two-year-old German Shepherd. Having never ran Finn next to a bicycle, I thought the thumb throttle, low seat height, and strong brakes would make things easier. It did, and he loved it. Then my wife wanted to take a spin, so Finn and I chased her down the sidewalk in our neighborhood. She loved it. Quickly, the conversation began about how much this press loan was going to end up costing me.

Since spending time riding the S73 all over bike paths and city streets around town, I’ve been stopped a number of times by kids and adults with questions. I’ve also fielded longing glances from younger kids who seem to be really into the concept. A neighbor (who I’d not met formally until now) had just brought home two beach cruiser-type pedal assist bikes for him and his wife and came down the street to chat with me about the Super73 because that’s what his son wants (his son, who I’ve seen with his friends making ramps out of dirt and scrap wood to jump all manner of wheeled rides). People of all sorts dig the Super73’s aesthetic.

The real world

During my time testing range and ride modes, I’ve found myself really enjoying the chance to explore areas around me that I hadn’t delved into until now. Sure, I needed to run out the battery for you guys to know what the real world mileage was a few times, but I also now had the freedom to explore areas where other motorized vehicles weren’t allowed. I’ve definitely found myself using the throttle most of the time, which also leads to my first nit to be picked – ergonomically, the crank is placed in an awkward position that’s not really conducive to pedaling. It’s difficult to get much power put into the pedals without any assistance (0 out of 4 modes of pedal assist). While walking/running the dog, level 1 or 2 assist gives a nice pace and we even hit an indicated 18 mph together while running through the park. Really, the pedals feel like an afterthought meant to help the S73 slot into the predetermined e-bike classes – not that there’s anything wrong with that if you’re okay using the motor 99% of the time. I did notice the S73 doesn’t have much to give when it comes to any sort of incline. If you’re stopped at the bottom of even a small hill it’s hard to get going and the awkward pedal placement and single gear makes it difficult to use your legs to help the situation.

The lack of a front fender means you’ll be getting whatever you ride through flipped up into your face which, in nearly every case, is unpleasant – in this case, duck scat.

The brakes and suspension are surprisingly good, too. The Tektro two-piston front brake is capable of lifting the rear tire without trying too hard as it squishes the fat front tire’s contact patch nice and wide under progressive braking. The rear is plenty easy to lock, but both levers provide good feedback.

The bicycle itself is made in Taiwan and uses the Taiwanese suspension brand, DNM. While there isn’t any adjustability for the fork, it does use a traditional inverted spring/oil setup. For the shock, preload and rebound adjustment is available. I haven’t had to tweak the preload from where it was when I received the bike, but adjusting the rebound through its 20-clicks made a significant difference in the shock’s behavior which is now much more comfortable (it was completely closed when the bike was delivered). Despite small jumps and high-speed runs over rough terrain, both the bumpstop on the shock and o-ring on the fork have yet to bottom.

super, scooter

For my first range test I put the bike in Off-road mode and ran it out at full throttle (31 mph indicated) which yielded 22.5 miles of range until it was completely dead. In Class 2, with an indicated top speed of 21 mph – again, only using the throttle, I managed 29 miles of range. These are worst-case scenarios and should be minimum mileage numbers.

The display can be used to toggle through pedal assist modes, turn on the headlight, and swap between speed, range, assist levels, and total miles. There’s also a settings menu for a couple of other tweaks.

Super73 claims 40 miles of range in Class 2 under throttle only operation and 75 miles under Class 1 pedal-assist mode. After trying to track the charging time a couple times it seems it takes quite a bit longer than the six to seven hours claimed. At this point, it seems like 9 to 10 hours is more realistic, though it’s been hard to track. During my last charge I had gotten 77% in 7.5 hours.

Super73’s line-up ranges from from the most expensive, the Roland Sands Design collab RX at 4,800 to the Z1 at 1,495. The Brooklyn I got to test retails for 3,495 and is currently sold out. There’s also a note on the website that suggests will be increasing going into 2023. So, what’s already a pricey e-bike will be getting even pricier.

Taking a look around

Could this new swath of e-bikes and small e-motos be the current gen’s CT70s or 90s. I hear it all the time from motorcyclist’s of a certain age, they love to tell stories about the small bikes they grew up on running around town and getting into trouble. Judging by the amount of attention this Super73 has gotten from kids, young and younger, versus any of the other motorcycles I’ve had around, I really hope I’m right. Maybe instead of growing up to become a lifelong Bandit owner, these kids will ride Zeros and whatever other e-motos are around then. Obviously, the industry needs an injection of new riders, maybe this is how it happens.

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