Electric bikes and the law: everything you need to know about ebike regulations…

Why eBike tuning is illegal dangerous

Electric bikes make your journey easier, with multiple levels of electrical assistance helping to take some of the strain out of cycling.

As you pedal, the ebike’s electric motor kicks in, providing you with additional speed and power. It means you’ll be cycling faster, while putting less effort in to your pedalling. It’s a great way of enjoying a more relaxing weekend ride or commute, enabling you to gently pedal while maintaining a higher speed.

However, all ebikes are manufactured to ensure certain speed restrictions are met, with the electric motor only working when you’re pedalling below this limit. This keeps ebikes as safe as possible for cyclists, as well as pedestrians and other road users.

Despite this, ebike tuning has become a commonplace ‘hack’ to get the bike’s motor working at higher speeds. It’s something that should be avoided though, not least because it’s dangerous, but also because it’s illegal!

We’ve put together everything you need to know about ebike tuning, and why it is both illegal and dangerous to do.

How fast are Ebikes allowed to go?

Following speed limits might not be something you’re used to if you’re a cyclist – mostly because it’s not often you can match the speed of free-flowing traffic unaided. As such, there’s no laws about speed limits for cyclists in the same way there are for drivers.

However, when you bring ebikes into the equation, different considerations have to be made. Unrestricted, the motor of an electric bike would see cyclists moving at a much higher speed than when unaided. As such, there’s a legal limit on ebikes, and at what speeds the motor is able to work at.

In line with EU law, the UK introduced legislation in 2015 that restricts the speed of ebikes to 15.5mph (25 km/h). This doesn’t mean it’s illegal to ride an ebike at a higher speed though, as the set limit only applies to the bike’s motor. The rules mean that the motor on an ebike is only allowed to work when the bike is travelling at less than the 15.5mph limit. You can still travel faster, but only through your own pedalling power – the motor can’t assist you any further.

How do Ebikes restrict speed?

To ensure this speed isn’t exceeded, ebikes aren’t allowed to have a motor fitted that’s more powerful than 250 watts. As well as this, there are speed sensors fitted – these are there to display your speed to you on the bike’s dashboard, but also so the motor knows when it needs to cut out.

What is Ebike tuning?

Ebike tuning is the process of ‘unlocking’ the full potential speed of the motor, bypassing the technology that make the motor cut off above 15.5mph.

There are a few ways of tuning an ebike, with the most common involving a “tuning dongle”. A tuning dongle is a small device that can be plugged into an ebike, to manipulate how the speed is read.

In short, the dongles remove the 15mph cut off point on bikes, or in some cases extends the limit it to a higher number.

Why is Ebike tuning illegal and dangerous?

One of the reasons ebike tuning is against the law is based around how we classify different vehicles. While ebikes continue to have a limited power motor and speed restrictions, they can continue to be treated as standard bicycles.

Once an ebike is tuned, the increased power and speed means it would actually be classed as a moped. With this change in classification comes multiple additional costs and restrictions – riders will need a driving license and motor insurance, as well as a registration plate on the bike. If you’ve had an ebike tuned, it’s very unlikely you’ll be adhering to these rules, and as such it’s illegal to ride a tuned ebike on public roads.

The increased speed means there’s more chance of accidents happening, and if injury or damage occurs, you’ll be liable for this due to the lack of insurance. You could also find yourself with a criminal conviction, leading to a fine or even imprisonment. There’s a further risk of accidents due to the components of the bike – ebikes aren’t built to specifically withstand these speeds, with parts such as the brakes potentially struggling and putting you in danger.

The Avaris Ebike has nine varied levels of electrical assistance, providing cyclists of both beginner and experienced level with the perfect solution. Set the assistance level to the lowest for a tougher bike ride, perfect for those who want a workout. Alternatively, put it to highest setting for a much more effortless ride, perfect for commuting without arriving at work in a sweat.

Electric bikes and the law: everything you need to know about ebike regulations

Electric bikes are growing quickly in popularity, with riders enjoying the extra assistance provided by the motor for everything from city riding and commuting by bike, to weekend road rides and trail-centre trips.

However, electric bikes are subject to different laws and regulations than non-assisted bikes. So what legally constitutes an electric bike, how much assistance can an ebike provide and what are the laws around riding one?

We’re here to answer those questions, starting with the laws in the United Kingdom, which are the same as those in the European Union (at the time of writing), before covering the USA and Australia. You can also read our buyer’s guide to choosing the best electric bike and our explainer on how electric bikes work. If you already own an ebike, we’ve got advice on electric bike maintenance, to help you keep your machine in top working order.

Are ebikes legal?

Yes, and their use is actively encouraged as a way to get more people riding, help them get fit and reduce the number of short car journeys made; take a look at our article on 14 benefits of riding an electric bike. You can buy a bike equipped with an electric motor across all the main bicycle categories: electric road bikes, electric hybrid bikes with flat bars and electric mountain bikes. You can even buy electric folding bikes, electric gravel bikes and electric cargo bikes. Also check out our guide to the best electric bikes, which explains more about the different types of electric bike available. There are some regulations covering the speed limit at which they are allowed to provide assistance and their power output, as we’ll explain below. However, if an electric bike meets these it’s perfectly legal to ride an electric bike anywhere you’d ride a normal bike. You can also buy an electric bike conversion kit to convert a pedal-only bike into an electric bike. Again, if it complies with the power output and speed regulations, this is perfectly legal. Read our beginner’s guide to electric bikes for more details on how an electric bike works.

What is the legal definition of an electric bike?

Most electric bikes in the UK fall within the ‘electrically assisted pedal cycle’ (EAPC) category. Russell Burton / Immediate Media

We’ll be dealing first with the laws covering electric bikes in the UK, and that starts with defining what constitutes an ebike, or an electrically assisted pedal cycle (EAPC) to give it its technical name. Not all electrically powered two-wheeled vehicles are covered by this category – we’ll cover some other types later. Also, an ebike doesn’t have to have two wheels – the legislation also applies to EAPCs with more than two wheels.

What is an EAPC?

  • Have pedals that can be used to propel it
  • Show either the power output or the manufacturer of the motor
  • Show either the battery’s voltage or the maximum speed of the bike
  • Have an electric motor with a maximum power output of 250 watts
  • Not have a motor able to propel the bike when it’s travelling at more than 15.5mph

An EAPC must have a motor with a maximum power output of no more than 250 watts. It also requires pedals to propel it. Russell Burton / Immediate Media

Let’s cover each of those elements in a little more detail.

An EAPC’s motor can only provide assistance when the rider is pedalling.

It will have sensors built into the system that recognise when the rider is pushing on the pedals and provide power from the motor in proportion to this, so the bike doesn’t run away with you or power you along without pedalling.

Electric bike laws state that assistance from the motor must cut out at 15.5mph (25km/h). That’s the same across the UK, EU and Australia (but, as we’ll come on to, this limit rises to 20mph in the USA).

You can ride an ebike faster than this, but the motor will cut out and you’ll then be riding solely under your own steam. It’s perfectly possible to exceed 15.5mph when travelling downhill, while a fitter rider will be able to exceed this speed on the flat, particularly on a performance-oriented, drop-bar electric road bike.

The motor’s power output has to be limited to a continuous output of 250 watts, too, although peak power may exceed this, which is why you see ebikes, particularly eMTBs, with quoted outputs significantly higher.

Note that there’s a newer category of cargo-carrying ebikes that can be fitted with a more powerful motor, up to 1,000 watts. This L1e-A classification requires the rider to be licensed, and the bike needs to be registered and insured. Power output can be regulated by a throttle on L1e-A bikes.

However, the vast majority of electric bikes sold in the UK fall under the EAPC classification, so that’s what we’ll FOCUS on here.

What are the regulations when riding an ebike?

If an ebike falls within the EAPC definition, legally it is treated like a regular, non-assisted bike, although you do have to be at least 14 years old to be allowed to ride an electric bike.

You don’t need to register the bike and you don’t need to have insurance (although we’d recommend having insurance that covers theft, personal accident and third-party liability as a minimum). We’ve got a guide to choosing the best bicycle insurance for your needs and you can even buy specific electric bike insurance policies.

You are also not legally required to wear a helmet in the UK, although we’d advise always using one, particularly with the higher weight and average speed of an electric bike.

As with any bike, it’s advisable to keep your bike well maintained to make sure you’re safe when riding. Read our simple guide to electric bike maintenance.

In the UK, you are not legally required to wear a helmet when riding an electric bike. Bosch eBike Systems

You can ride an ebike anywhere you are permitted to ride a regular bike. That includes on roads, cycle lanes and bridle paths. As with a non-electric bicycle, you’re not allowed to ride on pavements, unless they’re designated for mixed cycle and pedestrian use. You have to obey the Highway Code too, including stop signs and traffic lights.

If you’re not confident that you know the rules when riding, it’s worthwhile enrolling in a cycle safety class and getting to grips with the Highway Code.

Are the laws different in Northern Ireland?

Until mid-2020, by a legislative quirk, electric bikes were treated differently in Northern Ireland than in the rest of the UK. You had to register your ebike, have a licence to use it, carry insurance and wear a motorcycle helmet, so it was treated like a moped.

Those rules were changed in May 2020, so the law in Northern Ireland is now in line with the rest of the UK and an ebike that complies with the EAPC regulations above is treated like a non-electric bicycle.

Watts and torque

Electric bike motors designed for off-road riding typically offer more torque, and are better-suited to steep, loose climbs. Bosch eBike Systems

We’ve already mentioned that the motor must have a continuous peak output of 250 watts for a bike to be classified as an EAPC.

Some systems have a boost button on the handlebar that you can hold down to temporarily provide more power than this, which can be useful when accelerating. In all cases, the motor must cut out at 15.5mph, even if you’re holding down the boost button.

electric, bikes, need, know, ebike, regulations

An ebike motor’s output isn’t measured only in watts – its torque output and assistance levels are also important factors in its performance.

Torque is the amount of turning power that the motor delivers to the wheels, determining how fast the ebike will accelerate and how steep a gradient it can tackle. An ebike’s torque output isn’t governed by legislation.

Most ebike systems will feature a display to show key data such as the motor’s power setting and battery life, though more advanced units may include GPS, too. Russell Burton / Immediate Media

Torque figures vary significantly between electric bike motors, depending on what the system is designed for.

electric, bikes, need, know, ebike, regulations

Flat-bar electric hybrid bikes and drop-bar road ebikes typically have torque outputs of between 40Nm and 60Nm. For example, Bosch’s Active Line motor has a maximum torque of 40Nm and is designed for urban riding.

Electric mountain bikes are usually heavier and need to be able to tackle steep, loose off-road climbs. As a result, they will often have much greater torque outputs, starting at around 60Nm and, in the case of Bosch’s Performance Line CX motor, topping out at 85Nm.

What laws apply to non-compliant electric bikes?

There are a couple of types of electrically powered bikes that don’t fall within the legal definition of an EAPC.

Speed pedelecs

First up are electric bikes where you have to pedal but the motor’s output is more than 250 watts and assistance isn’t speed limited at 25km/h. They’re often called speed pedelecs.

An example is the range of electric bikes made by Swiss brand Stromer. Its ebike motors have power outputs of between 670 watts and 850 watts, which in turn can power its machines up to 45km/h.

Twist-and-go

The second category is for ‘twist-and-go’ electric bikes. These are models where motor input is controlled by a twist grip on the handlebar, so you don’t need to pedal to keep the bike moving.

It’s worth mentioning that these twist-and-go ‘accelerators’ are different from the controllers often found on the handlebars of compliant EAPCs, which let you choose between assistance levels.

In the case of both speed pedelecs and twist-and-go bikes, these machines are treated by UK law like petrol-powered mopeds.

electric, bikes, need, know, ebike, regulations

That means they must be taxed and insured, you must have a licence and you need to wear a motorcycle-style helmet to ride them. Like mopeds, they can only be ridden on roads or unrestricted byways.

EU laws

The laws covering electric bikes in EU countries follow the same pattern as in the UK, as they were set out at EU level when the UK was still in the EU. So there’s exactly the same assistance limit of 25kph and the same rules on power output of 250 watts maximum continuous power. Speed pedelecs are treated similarly too.

What are the laws on electric bikes in the USA?

Electric bike laws differ from state to state in the USA, so check your local regulations. Russell Burton / Immediate Media

In the United States, federal law (the Consumer Product Safety Act, to be specific) defines a “low-speed electric bicycle” as a two- or three-wheeled vehicle, with a maximum motor output of 750 watts and assistance limited to 20mph.

An ebike that complies with these regulations is treated by federal law in the same way as a non-electric bicycle.

However, there are significant differences at state level as to how electric bikes are classified and, consequently, how they may be used. That may include regulations on requiring a licence, wearing a helmet and insurance.

There are also differences at state level in the minimum legal age to ride an ebike, maximum speed and maximum power output.

In short, check the legislation in the state where you plan to ride.

Many states also follow a tiered system, whereby electric bikes are defined by three classes. The 750-watt motor limit and 20mph assistance limit we’ve outlined above apply broadly to Class 1 ebikes, but Class 2 or 3 ebikes may provide assistance up to higher speeds or use a twist-and-go system.

Once again, different laws may apply from one state to another, so check your local legislation.

What are the laws on electric bikes in Australia?

In Australia, electric bikes are classified into two categories. Starting with the second category, the regulations are broadly similar to those in the UK and Europe, with a maximum speed of 25kph and a maximum power output of 250 watts.

These bikes can also have a throttle that cuts out at 6kph, acting as a walk mode to help move the ebike around when dismounted. Walk mode is a common feature in electric bike motors. Above 6kph, you need to pedal to keep the bike moving.

The other category is electric bikes that are throttle operated. These too must be assistance limited at 25kph, but their maximum continuous power output can only be 200 watts.

Regardless of the ebike category, you must wear a helmet when riding and you must have working front and rear lights.

How Much Motor Power Is Needed For Your E-Bike?

E-bikes come in a range of different levels of power. On the low end, many mid-drive motors produce 250W. On the high end, we’ve reviewed e-bikes with hub motors that produce 1000W and there are even e-bikes with unrestricted motors that are more like motorcycles than e-bikes. Considering how broad a range that is, someone buying an e-bike—especially the first-time buyer—has good reason to wonder just how much power they need.

What are we talking about when we say power?

Generally, when we talk about power, what we are talking about is how much work the motor can do. We measure that work in watts. Next question: What’s a watt? A watt expresses the change of one joule of electrical energy per second into mechanical energy. One joule of electrical energy burned over a second is equal to one watt (1W).

When e-bike companies talk about nominal wattage, they are talking about steady-state output. Think of it as a pace that someone can pedal for an hour. Peak wattage would be a sprint up a hill. No one can sprint for an hour, right? So when a manufacturer says their hub motor will produce 750W nominally, they are saying it can produce 750W for as long as the battery has charge. A peak of 1250W means that it can produce that much wattage for a short burst, like getting up a hill or through an intersection.

The other concept we need to understand when we talk about power is torque. Torque is a twisting force and it is measured either in pound-feet (lb-ft) or newton-meters (Nm). With e-bike motors, torque is expressed in newton-meters.

At the risk of being obvious, bigger numbers mean more wattage, more torque, more go.

The kind of motor matters

So the motor with the most wattage and torque is the best motor, right? Actually, not so fast. The type of motor makes a big difference.

A hub motor that produces 750W is powerful. That’s a solid number, by any estimation. That standard can’t be applied to mid-drive motors, though. When the motor is positioned up front, with the axle for the crankset (bottom bracket) passing through the motor, that’s called a mid-drive motor. Mid-drive motors work on a completely different scale of power.

A mid-drive motor helps to turn the crankset, kinda like adding extra feet and pedals. That means the motor is able to take advantage of the mechanical advantage offered by the gears. As a result, a mid-drive motor doesn’t need to produce huge amounts of power to be effective. Most mid-drive motors produce a mere 250W.

Here’s a way to frame how effective mid-drive motors are: The toughest riding environment e-bikes encounter are technical mountain bike trails; an eMTB will encounter trails steeper than any paved road around. The hallmark of a good eMTB is a mid-drive motor.

A 250W mid-drive motor producing 50Nm of torque can more effectively drive a rider than a 750W hub motor that produces 90Nm of torque.

In many ways, the performance of a 250W mid-drive motor and a 750W hub motor are comparable. Both can propel a rider to 20 mph quickly, and they offer similar acceleration. Mid-drive motors weigh less and use electricity more efficiently, which means they can go plenty far on a relatively small battery, which also reduces weight. What’s the catch? E-bikes with mid-drive motors are substantially more expensive than ones with hub motors.

Why do some motors with the same rating perform differently?

Here at Best Electric Bikes, the bulk of what we review are e-bikes with 750W brushless, geared hub motors, 7-speed drivetrains and hydraulic disc brakes produced by consumer-direct brands. That’s the market’s sweet spot.

We’ve encountered e-bikes with 750W Bafang hub motors that would go 20 mph in PAS 5 and others that would go 26 mph in PAS 5. Why would two identical motors go two different speeds? In a word, the controller. Each company decides what speed each PAS level will deliver the rider to. In the case of Class 1 or 2 e-bikes, PAS 5 is likely to be 20 mph. But in a Class 3 e-bike, that same hub motor may be tuned to go 24, 26 or even 28 mph.

Some manufacturers allow users to adjust what speed each of those PAS levels corresponds to. For instance, Aventon’s smartphone app gives riders control of each PAS level, including the ability to “unlock” the performance and ride at Class 3 speeds.

How important is the battery?

An e-bike’s battery is a critical piece of how an e-bike performs. Most e-bikes feature motors and batteries that operate at either 36V or 48V. Voltage isn’t especially critical, but it can make a difference in high-demand moments.

Think of voltage as a drinking straw. volts equates to a bigger straw (diameter, not length). It’s the difference between drinking through one of those little cocktail straws and a regular soda straw.

Decisions, decisions

So those are the factors that determine how powerful an e-bike is. Choosing the e-bike with the right amount of power depends on the riders needs. Here are the factors we encourage shoppers to consider:

  • What’s the budget? When someone can afford an e-bike with a mid-drive motor, questions about power don’t disappear, but the performance of mid-drive motors is so good that they meet the needs of nearly any rider.
  • How much does the rider weigh? The greater a rider’s mass, the more power the rider will need to get up to speed and stay there.
  • Where will the e-bike be ridden? Are the roads paved or unpaved? Is the terrain hilly or flat? Is it an urban environment with lots of starting and stopping? Hills and natural surfaces require more power and lots of stopping means lots of accelerating up to speed; a more powerful motor will accelerate back up to speed more quickly.
  • What sort of experience does the rider want? A light e-bike with a smaller motor can give a very zippy, nimble feeling, but it will be more enjoyable for a rider who wants to pedal plenty. For someone who wants to cruise and make liberal use of a throttle, more power is called for, especially if the riding will include hills. The person who wants to ride mountain bike trails will need an eMTB with a mid-drive motor.
  • How fast is fast? Buyers need to ask themselves how they will ride. The rider who accelerates up to top speed from every stop and stays at top speed until the next stop needs more power than the rider who is happy to cruise along at 12-15 mph.

Conclusion

Like so many decisions in life, an e-bike buyer must weigh multiple considerations. Answering those questions can be difficult when staring at a website, though. Test riding some different e-bikes will help build a frame of reference. Test rides will give a rider a sense of how much speed they like, how quickly they like to accelerate and how much they want to use a throttle.

Even if someone can’t ride the particular e-bike they’ve got their eye on, it’s not hard to find something similar to ride at a local e-bike store. With the right e-bike, questions about power disappear and the rider can FOCUS on enjoying the ride.

BIKES

Full suspension or hardtail? 29 or 27.5 inch? Mountain bike with or without electric drive? We have the perfect bike for you.

E-MTB

No matter what you have in mind, ride the E-MTB. Robust, powerful and incredibly versatile: the only limit is your imagination.

HARDTAIL

All-rounders that master both steep climbs with ease and convince downhill with high driving fun.

FULL SUSPENSION

Fast, smooth and safe full suspension bikes with a downhill geometry. 105-190 mm suspension travel.

  • Rahmenverfügbarkeiten
  • Testride Hotel Hirschen
  • Das sind wir
  • Factory News
  • Kontakt
  • Öffnungszeiten
  • Händler Distributoren
  • Frag einen Besitzer
  • Custom Bike Galerie
  • Bikepark Tour 2023
  • Jobs
  • Stories

FOLLOW US

By selecting “Accept all”, you give us permission to use the following services on our website: YouTube, Vimeo, ReCaptcha, Google Analytics 4, Google Analytics (Universal Analytics), Pixel. You can change the settings at any time (fingerprint icon in the bottom left corner). For further details, please see Individual configuration and our Privacy notice.

The settings you specify here are stored in the “local storage” of your device. The settings will be remembered for the next time you visit our online shop. You can change these settings at any time (fingerprint icon in the bottom left corner).

For more information on cookie lifetime and required essential cookies, please see the Privacy notice.

To view YouTube contents on this website, you need to consent to the transfer of data and storage of third-party cookies by YouTube (Google). This allows us to improve your user experience and to make our website better and more interesting. Without your consent, no data will be transferred to YouTube. However, you will also not be able to use the YouTube services on this website.

To view Vimeo contents on this website, you need to consent to the transfer of data and storage of third-party cookies by Vimeo. This allows us to improve your user experience and to make our website better and more interesting. Without your consent, no data will be transferred to Vimeo. However, you will also not be able to use the Vimdeo services on this website.

To submit forms on this page, you need to consent to the transfer of data and storage of third-party cookies by Google. With your consent, reCAPTCHA, a Google service to avoid spam messages via contact forms, will be embedded. This service allows us to provide our customers with a safe way to contact us via online forms. At the same time, the service prevents spam bots from compromising our services. After you gave your permission, you might be asked to answer a security prompt to send the form. If you do not consent, unfortunately you cannot use the form. Please contact us in a different way.

Dies ist ein Webanalysedienst.

Erhobene Daten: anonymisierte IP Adresse, Datum und Uhrzeit des Besuchs, Nutzungsdaten, Klickpfad, App-Aktualisierungen, Browser Informationen, Geräte-Informationen, JavaScript-Support, Besuchte Seiten, Referrer URL, Standort-Informationen, Kaufaktivität, Widget-Interaktionen

Google Ireland Ltd, Gordon House, Barrow Street, Dublin 4,IE

Dies ist ein Webanalysedienst.

Erhobene Daten: anonymisierte IP Adresse, Datum uns Uhrzeit des Besuchs, Nutzungsdaten, Klickpfad, App-Aktualisierungen, Browser Informationen, Geräte-Informationen, JavaScript-Support, Besuchte Seiten, Referrer URL, Standort-Informationen, Kaufaktivität, Widget-Interaktionen

Google Ireland Ltd, Gordon House, Barrow Street, Dublin 4,IE

ist ein Online-Social-Networking-Dienst, der es seinen Nutzern ermöglicht, sich mit Freunden und Familie zu verbinden.

Zweck der Datenverarbeitung: Marketing

Hinweise zur Nutzung von Cookies über den Dienst “” finden Sie hier: https://de-decom/policy.php

Kategorien verarbeiteter Daten: Klickpfad,Sichtbarkeit von Anzeigen messen,Mausbewegung,Zeitstempel,Klicks auf Anzeigen verfolgen,Uhrzeit und Datum verfolgen,Verfolgen des Benutzergeräts,Tracking des Benutzernetzwerks,User-Agent,Sprache,Besuchte Webseite, Zeitzone

Rechtsgrundlage für die Datenverarbeitung: Einwilligung (DSGVO 6.1.a)

Datenübertragung außerhalb der EU: Dieser Anbieter kann Ihre personenbezogenen Daten außerhalb des EWR/der EU übertragen, speichern oder verarbeiten. Diese Länder haben möglicherweise nicht das gleiche Datenschutzniveau und die Durchsetzung Ihrer Rechte kann eingeschränkt oder nicht möglich sein.

Meta Platforms Ireland Limited, 4 Grand Canal Square, Grand Canal, Dublin 2, Dublin, D02x525, IE

Would you like to see these contents? Activate the desired contents for one session only or allow the website to remember these settings. Once you have given your consent, the third-party data can be loaded. For this, third-party cookies might be stored on your device. You can change these settings at any time (fingerprint icon in the bottom left corner). For further details, please see the Privacy notice.

Too bad, now we have to go back to the glass ball or read in the coffee grounds to understand our visitors.

Why do we have to do that? Quite simply, you have forbidden us to watch Your steps on our site with Google Analytics. That sounds dramatically to You, we know. But look at it: we do not even know who YOU are, we just see that SOMEONE looks at our pages, how he/she does that, how long this SOMEONE lingers on the respective pages, etc. We do not know who You are, whether You are male or female, how old You are, how Your weight is. no idea. Nor do we pass this data on to Google, we don not have them not at all! Nevertheless, this data of SOMEONE will provide us with valuable information about our site, we want You to like everything here, that You feel good and. of course. buy our products.

So we can see where there are problems. If many visitors leave our site during the purchase process while choosing the payment method, we know that something is wrong and can improve it. Sounds good, right? Thats good for You and good for us. So it´s a win-win situation. So let us accompany You on Your way through our store. Deal?

Great, you got it! Now we can work better on our offer again!

Too bad, now we have to go back to the glass ball or read in the coffee grounds to understand our visitors.

Why do we have to do that? Quite simply, you have forbidden us to watch Your steps on our site with Google Analytics. That sounds dramatically to You, we know. But look at it: we do not even know who YOU are, we just see that SOMEONE looks at our pages, how he/she does that, how long this SOMEONE lingers on the respective pages, etc. We do not know who You are, whether You are male or female, how old You are, how Your weight is. no idea. Nor do we pass this data on to Google, we don not have them not at all! Nevertheless, this data of SOMEONE will provide us with valuable information about our site, we want You to like everything here, that You feel good and. of course. buy our products.

So we can see where there are problems. If many visitors leave our site during the purchase process while choosing the payment method, we know that something is wrong and can improve it. Sounds good, right? Thats good for You and good for us. So it´s a win-win situation. So let us accompany You on Your way through our store. Deal?

Leave a Comment