Electric bike conversion kits 2023 – Give any bike a boost. New electric cycle

Electric Cycles

Take a look at 48 popular electric cycles available in India in the price range of Rs. 21,999. Rs. 5.00 Lakh. The most popular electric cycles include Motovolt Urbn e-Bike (Rs. 49,999), Polarity Smart Sport (Rs. 40,000) and Polarity Smart Executive (Rs. 38,000). The top manufacturers that produce electric cycles are Motovolt, Polarity Smart, Toutche Electric, Hero Lectro, EMotorad.

Top Electric Cycles in India 2023

Motovolt Urbn e-BikePolarity Smart SportPolarity Smart ExecutiveToutche Heileo M200Toutche Heileo H200Toutche Heileo M100Hero Lectro WINN-XHero Lectro WINNEMotorad DoodleFirefox Adventron
Rs. 49,999
Rs. 40,000
Rs. 38,000
Rs. 57,900
Rs. 53,900
Rs. 49,900
Rs. 44,419
Rs. 44,090
Rs. 79,800
Rs. 60,000

Electric Bike Charging Stations in Top Cities

Upcoming Electric Bikes

  • TVS Creon

Vespa Elettrica

Revolt RV Cafe Racer

Evoke Motorcycles Urban S

Evoke Motorcycles Urban Classic

Latest News on Electric Cycles

Here’s a closer look at the top-spec models from Polarity’s Sport and Executive range

Electric Cycles User Reviews

The big waste electric bike with high price tag.Not even worth as bicycle.No customer service and help given by motovolt urbn.

Toutche heileo m200 is born out of love and commitment to design, Quality, And experience.It has a 250w rear hub bldc motor which has a top speed of 25kmph.It looks great and is available at a good price.

Decent build looks average but does the job overall good performance and suitable for heightened people

electric, bike, conversion, kits

Electric Cycles Question and Answers

Available in four jazzy colours, bookings for the Urbn have already begun on Motovolt’s website for just Rs 99. You can even get it in the more than 100 retail stores that the company has across the country. With that, the Urbn goes up against the Bounce Infinity E1 and Hero Electric Optima CX(Single Battery). It also acts as a great alternative to the TVS XL 100 with a lower running cost considering it’s running on electricity. Its payload, too, is not far off from the X100’s.

For the availability, we would suggest you to please connect with the nearest authorized dealer in your city as it depends on their stock book. Follow the link and select your desired city for dealership details.

You need no license or registration in India for scooters that have their top speed capped at 25km per hour. However, the Motovolt Motovolt Urbn e-Bike’s top speed is around 25kmph, thus not requiring a license and registration.

The brand hasn’t shared the overall warranty for Polarity Smart Executive. However, its battery comes with a 3-year warranty as standard.

FAQs on Best Electric Cycles

The most popular electric cycles in the market are Motovolt Urbn e-Bike, Polarity Smart Sport and Polarity Smart Executive.

electric, bike, conversion, kits

Hornback M1 is the cheapest electric cycle in India priced at Rs. 21,999.

Polarity Smart Executive is the fastest electric cycle in India and it’s top speed is 60 kmph.

Electric bike conversion kits 2023 – Give any bike a boost

Why pay for a brand new e-bike when electric bike conversion kits can easily give a boost to the bike you already have?

E-bikes have enabled people who need or want some pedal assistance to broaden the range and scope of their riding while making it easier than ever to choose sustainable and greener transport methods.

Whatever your reason for wanting pedal assistance — whether it makes cycling more accessible to you and your family, or you think you’ll have more fun with that boost. the e-bike market is vast and often requires a large upfront cost. So if you’re struggling to find an e-bike that suits you, and already have a bike at home, then you might consider an electric bike conversion kit instead.

Whichever option you go for, there’s no denying that the best electric bikes make it easier for riders to explore and experience different terrains and riding environments. Plus they offer a cheaper and greener form of transport to get you from A to B at a higher pace for less effort than a conventional bike, which is especially beneficial for those who are commuting or using them for work. The best electric bikes for commuting can make for a speedier and altogether less sweaty cycle to work, not to mention the money saved when compared to soaring fuel or rail fare prices.

But what if you’re not sure about which option to go for? If you’re weighing up an e-bike vs an e-bike conversion kit, consider whether you already have a bike that you love riding. Converting it means you can continue enjoying the same ride quality while introducing you to a new world of electrically-assisted fun.

To make all these decisions easier for you, we’ve outlined the key things to consider when fitting an electric conversion kit to your own bike, including the various motor and battery options available. We’ve tested as many as possible in real-world riding conditions, assessing how easy they are to fit, and what kind of electric assistance they provide.

So here are our findings, and our roundup of the best electric bike conversion kits you can buy right now.

Best electric bike conversion kits available now

You can trust Cyclingnews

Our experts spend countless hours testing cycling tech and will always share honest, unbiased advice to help you choose. Find out more about how we test.

Reasons to avoid

A thorough purchase process ensures the product is easy to install, but it’s complicated so can take time

The first on our list is one we reviewed very recently and which really impressed us. The Cytronex electric bike conversion kit is extremely well thought-out, with great specs and top-notch engineering. You only need Allen keys to install it, it comes with an accompanying app to offer up basic diagnostics, and once it’s set up it’s a breeze to operate.

When purchasing, you’ll go through a thorough process, which can feel a bit over-complicated, but in doing so it means the actual conversion is a straightforward one. We tested out the Cytronex on a Brompton T-Line and found it delivered smooth and intuitive power. Plus, our hands-on time with it leads us to believe it’s strong and durable enough to use for commuting.

While it’s pricier than some of the options listed below, one thing to consider is that it comes from a UK-based company that offers comprehensive customer support. You can pay less for a Bafang kit on Amazon, but buying direct from a company that can support you if anything goes wrong, makes it a smarter choice in our view.

For an in-depth look, check out our Cytronex review.

Reasons to avoid

One of the easiest ways to convert a bike to electric is to swap out the front wheel for one with a front hub motor. This is the approach that Swytch takes, but there’s more to a good system than just a motor and battery. From our time testing and reviewing it, it’s clear to us that the team behind Swytch have considered the whole system in its design.

The battery mounts to the handlebars and we found that a really useful detail. It is easy to disconnect and take it away for storage, so it doesn’t get stolen when you are out and about, or to lighten the bike when, for example, it needs to be carried up a flight of stairs.

The 2022 Swytch system, which we tested, makes use of a neat handlebar-mounted LCD display instead of the buttons on the battery it had before. There’s also a cadence sensor that attaches to your bike. It’s a well-thought-out system that looks and feels great.

To read all about how it works, and find out why we gave it four stars, take a look at our Swytch review.

Reasons to avoid

If you’re on a tighter budget than the Cytronex or Swytch allow for, then as we mentioned above, getting a kit from Chinese manufacturer Bafang may be a better option. Plus, if you like the idea of an electric bike conversion kit but just don’t want to have to deal with the added complexity of a mid-drive setup, then the Bafang Front Hub kit makes things much easier.

Like the mid-drive system listed below, the Bafang Front Hub Motor kit covers everything required and gives tons of spec choices. We started by choosing our wheel size and display preference, then added the battery size and shape we wanted.

We did find it more of a time investment, given the installation process was more complex than the Cytronex, Swytch and Rubbee, but this did allow us to achieve a powerful, high-quality set-up.

To find out more about how we got on, read our Bafang Front Hub Motor review.

Reasons to avoid

There are a number of simple install options on the list but the Rubbee X takes it a step further. We were really impressed with how easy it was to attach the mount to the bike’s seat post and then click the unit into the mount. There’s no need to change the wheel like the Swytch system. Here the motor sits on top of the rear tyre and a roller pushes it around from above. There’s also a wireless cadence sensor, as this is a cadence-based system that adjusts based on pedalling cadence, rather than torque.

There is a slick-looking 250-watt motor with a single battery in the base kit. If the 10-mile range of the base unit feels a little constricting, another battery can be added to double the range. Rubbee also has a handy phone app that can be used to change assistance modes.

We’ve spent some time testing it out, so why not check out our Rubbee X e-bike conversion kit review for more details.

Reasons to avoid

Bafang is one of the largest and most well-known electric bike motor companies in the world. It’s been around since 2003, and in 2014 Bafang established a US arm to better support the US market. There are many well-known electric bike companies sourcing its components, so if you want to get in the game and source your own electric bike components, you won’t go far wrong with Bafang.

This particular option covers everything you need for a mid-drive motor conversion kit. As long as the bike you are starting with has a bottom bracket sized between 68 and 73mm, this kit will work. From there you can choose the front chainring size, the battery size, and what display works for you.

If you’re not sure whether or not a mid-drive motor conversion is what you need (or what other drive options there are), head down to our FAQs at the bottom of this article for an explanation of all the possibilities you can choose from.

Reasons to avoid

The most natural-feeling electric bike conversion kits are going to be those with a mid-mounted motor. If that works for you and you also like the idea of doing some pedalling, then the very best is a mid-mounted motor paired with a torque sensor.

Instead of the system knowing you are pedalling and adding power, such as the Rubbee X cadence-based system above, a torque-based system adds a percentage of power. The Max torque available on this TongSheng system is 80Nm but depending on your chosen assist level, that 80Nm will add between 36 and 300 per cent to your pedalling power.

To keep it simple, think about it as an amplifier. If you pedal harder you go faster, just like a normal bike, but now your muscles have extra support, so you can go further with less effort.

Reasons to avoid

If you like the idea of a mid-drive system and you want it to have torque-sensing pedal assist then you’ve got a few choices. The challenge with a system like that is complexity. For some people, it’s no big deal to take apart a bottom bracket, but for others, it’s a slightly more intimidating prospect.

The Pendix system does the same thing as other kits but there is a dealer network that handles sales, support, and installation. This comes with an extra cost attached, but the benefit is that you can feel comfortable that the system is correctly installed and ready to ride.

Types of e-bike conversion kits

Friction drive conversion

A friction drive e-bike conversion means there is a roller that pushes against the wheels tyre. So when the roller turns, the wheel turns. It’s not the most efficient strategy, but it’s simple and it works. There is very little involved with regard to making it work but, at the end of the day, it doesn’t work as well as other systems out there. The Rubbee X is an example of a friction drive conversion kit system.

Mid-drive conversion

The best electric bikes tend to be mid-drive because this delivers the most natural ride feel, and the same is true of conversion kits. The weight sits low in the frame and the power gets applied to the crank for a more natural power delivery sensation. The only downside is pricing and packaging, plus it can be complex to set up yourself. Different standards make it challenging to figure out exactly what you need, as well. The Bafang Mid Drive Motor Kit is an example of this.

Electric bike wheel conversion

Swapping either a front or rear wheel for one with a hub-mounted motor is a good balance. The conversion process is very simple and, depending on how the battery mounts, the weight distribution can be quite good. Powering the wheel does change the way the power delivery feels, and making the front wheel heavy can affect the handling of the bike. If mid-drive seems overwhelming, this is an excellent option. Cytronex and Swytch are examples of this.

How to choose the best electric bike conversion kit for you

If you’re interested in fitting an electric bike conversion kit to one of your own bikes, you should consider your own personal requirements first and do plenty of research. You’re in the right place, as this guide will help you with a lot of that.

Before anything, familiarise yourself with the laws regarding e-bikes in your region. Then you may want to choose a conversion kit based on your range and journey needs. If you live in a hilly city, for example, you may want something with a little more top-end power. Lastly, check whether or not the system is compatible with the bike you plan to fit it onto. If you don’t feel comfortable doing this yourself, think about getting a quote for installation from a reputable bike shop.

Do all electric bike conversion kits come with a battery?

The short answer is ‘not always’. You need a battery, of course, so when browsing online, make sure the kit you select has one included. Since not all kits include a battery, you might find yourself browsing through options and landing on something at an unbelievable price. If that’s the case, double check it’s got the battery included. If not, then it is possible to source the battery yourself, but be sure about what you are getting.

How fast do electric bikes go?

This is hard to answer specifically as electric bikes are, on the whole, designed to assist pedalling rather than replace it, and it is the same with electric bike conversion kits. The measurement of the power of the motors is in wattage and, in effect, the higher the wattage of the motor, the faster speeds it will be capable of achieving.

However, the speed is often limited as a result of country-specific regulations. In the UK, the assistance an e-bike can legally provide is up to 25kmph (15.5mph) and, after that point, the bike can go faster but without any assistance from the motor. Anything faster would not meet the UK’s electrically assisted pedal cycles (EAPC) criteria, would be classed as a moped or motorcycle, and need to be licensed and taxed appropriately. The laws are different depending on the country, with the United States, for example, allowing more powerful motors – although individual states have their own legal frameworks.

Which bike is best for electric conversion?

You should consider the condition and componentry of your old bike. With an electric motor dramatically increasing the torque, using a low-quality or worn drivetrain will result in poor performance, with shifting being affected and the chain skipping or even snapping. Another important consideration is the brakes, adding the extra weight of an electric bike conversion kit and increasing potential speeds will put more stress on the brakes as they try to curtail momentum. We recommend choosing to convert a bike that has disc brakes as they will provide far better braking performance.

I haven’t heard of a lot of these brands, are they safe to use?

In the world of electric bikes, there are a lot of brands you may not have ever heard of. There’s been a boom going on for a while, so new brands are popping up all the time. Not only that but Europe, and especially the US, are playing catch up to the trend of electric bikes. You will probably stumble across a lot of unfamiliar brand names.

Consumers have a tendency to look away when they encounter a new brand. It’s not a bad strategy most of the time but in the electric bike world, including conversion kits, you’ve got to be more open than that. If you aren’t open to names you’ve never heard of you will find the options limited. A lot of the names you may come across are unfamiliar to you but have a solid history behind them.

That doesn’t mean you should go forward blindly. Do your research and be careful with your money, like always. The only thing that might be different is the need for being open to new companies. At the very least be willing to look a little deeper, read reviews, and do some research. The brand you’ve never heard of might actually be a well-established brand from a different part of the world.

Is converting my bike to an electric bike worth it?

There are plenty of reasons to install an electric bike conversion kit to your current bike, but the question of whether it’s worth doing is going to depend on your circumstances.

For many kits, once the installation has been completed, it will be an arduous task to remove it again, so one of the questions you’ll need to ask yourself is whether or not you want to retain the ability to use the bike as a ‘normal’ bike. If you expect to be flitting between the two (powered and non-powered) then a kit that can simply be folded out of the way – like the Rubbee X – might be perfect, but you might instead prefer to simply buy a second bike for the convenience.

The second question is to assess the state of your current bike. If you don’t yet have one, then the cost of buying a bike, buying an electric bike conversion kit and then fitting it, is probably not going to be worth the time, effort, or money involved. However, if you have a bike that is in reasonable repair, then the value for money – and effort – will be greater.

Beyond the financial and practical element, the question of ‘is it worth it’ will also depend on the amount of use you get out of it. E-bikes can be incredibly motivating and enjoyable and if converting your standard bike to electric helps you to ditch the car on a regular basis, then the answer becomes clear.

If you want a monetary answer to this question, then there are ways to work out whether the investment is worth it. Take a moment to think about your current car usage and work out the cost per day/mile, including fuel, parking and running costs. Try to work out how many journeys, days or miles you will use the bike for after it is converted. Once you know this, you should be able to work out the reduction in car running costs per mile/day and, with that, you should be able to work out how many miles/days it will take for the electric bike conversion kit to pay for itself.

Should I just buy an electric bike instead?

Remember to consider all your options. You have a bike in the shed you haven’t touched for many years and it seems like a perfect candidate for conversion to an electric bike. It might be, but it’s also just as possible that it’s a better candidate for a sale. Sometimes it’s better to take the money from that sale and put it towards an electric bike someone else built.

As with anything, consideration for the end-use during design and build can have advantages. A quality electric bike conversion kit might end up being very close to the price of a complete electric bike. If a company starts with a clean slate and designs an electric bike, it’s easier to keep costs low and integration high. Really consider why you are thinking about converting your bike and whether it makes sense compared to what’s on the market. In some cases, it will but in others, it won’t.

Are electric bike conversion kits legal?

The kits themselves are entirely legal, and fitting them to your bike is equally so. However, the question of legality arises in relation to where you then plan to use your newly powered electric bike. The answer will vary hugely, depending on where in the world you’re based, and which kit you choose.

For example, in the US, there are different classes of e-bikes that vary by their power, speed limitations and whether or not they have a throttle, and each class is subject to different rules. Things are a little more simple elsewhere, with the UK stating that anything with a speed limiter of over 25km/h is classified as a moped, while anything up to 25km/h (15.5mph) is classed as a bicycle.

Before you complete any purchase, make sure you have an understanding of the local laws that govern electric bikes, which is where our guide to e-bike classes comes in handy.

How do you install an e-bike conversion kit?

Sadly, there is no single and simple answer to this question. Each electric bike conversion kit works in a different way and therefore fits onto your bike in a different way too.

The most simple options are the friction-drive kits, such as the Rubbee X, which place a roller onto your rear tyre. In the example of the Rubbee, you simply need to mount the device onto your seat post, with the roller placed against the tyre. However, more complex systems require the removal of drivetrain components and wheels, and the installation of wiring. These are far from impossible, but they may require some tools and a bit of patience.

How much does an electric bike conversion kit cost?

will depend very much on the conversion kit in question. Some are available for as little as £250 (350), while the more high-spec and integrated kits can fetch as much as £750 (900).

Will a bike shop fit my electric bike conversion kit?

It’s understandable that you might not want to take on the arduous task of fitting your electric bike conversion kit yourself. You might not have the tools, the know-how, the confidence, or simply the time to invest. Luckily, almost all bike shops will be happy to fit it for you.

Some systems, such as the Pendix kit listed above, are only sold via physical stores and the fitting is sold as part of the overall package. However, with kits bought online such as the Bafang kit, the shop will charge you for the time it takes, which will add to the cost of the overall conversion. In our opinion, knowing that it’s been done correctly and safely is worth spending extra.

Some bike shops or workshops also may refuse to install a conversion kit to a bike they consider unfit for purpose or potentially unsafe. If you plan to have your local shop fit a kit it may be worth consulting with them on the job first to make sure they are happy to do it for you.

Individuals carrying out the instructions in this guide do so at their own risk and must exercise their independent judgement. There is a risk to safety if the operation described in the instructions is not carried out with the appropriate equipment, skill and diligence and therefore you may wish to consult a bike mechanic. Future Publishing Limited provides the information for this project in good faith and makes no representations as to its completeness or accuracy. To the fullest extent permitted by law, neither Future Publishing Limited, its suppliers or any of their employees, agents or subcontractors shall have any liability in connection with the use of this information, provided that nothing shall exclude or limit the liability of any party for personal injury or death caused by negligence or for anything else which cannot be excluded or limited by law.

How The Electric Bike Is Changing Travel: Is An E-bike Worth It?

The electric bike revolution is here, and it’s changing the way we travel.

With their innovative design, ease of use, and low environmental impact, e-bikes are becoming increasingly popular with riders of all ages and experience.

But what exactly are e-bikes? And more importantly – are they worth it?

While electric-assisted bikes were designed with the 35 and over crowd in mind, they are now just as popular with a younger generation of riders who are embracing the technology.

For decades, bikes have been seen as a necessity, not a luxury.

The e-bike has undergone a revolution and is currently the most popular bike on the market.

Technology has improved, making them safer, more durable, and more reliable, while new laws have been passed that make them legal to operate on roads.

So whether you want to reduce your carbon footprint, or take advantage of this new technology on bike trips – let’s look at the pros and cons so you can decide whether going e-bike is right for you.

Why The Sudden Popularity With Electric Bicycles?

Their appeal lies in the ability to level the playing field for cyclists of all experiences.

Electric bikes allow couples, groups, and families with different fitness and experience levels to travel together while making cycling accessible across difficult routes and long distances.

Bicycles have always been a healthy way to keep fit, save money on transportation costs, and enjoy the fresh air with the freedom to explore on your travels.

But once you cross the 20-30 mile mark, for many riders, they become quite tiring.

Electric bicycles solve this problem by giving you a little push when you need it.

The pedal assist can give riders just enough boost to try routes that would otherwise be outside their comfort zones.

And because you don’t tire as quick, you can bike for longer, which can open up opportunities for trips you might not have even considered.

Electric bikes offer more flexibility than traditional bikes when it comes to distance and terrain capability.

They can be ridden anywhere from city streets to rough trails while providing more speed and ease of use compared to regular bikes.

And they provide great exercise benefits without exerting too much effort due to their powered motors. perfect if you’re looking for light physical activity without exhausting yourself completely.

They also don’t require expensive fuel costs or extensive maintenance, you just simply charge up your battery overnight, and you’re ready for another day of riding!

As well as being affordable and convenient, using an e-bike also presents environmental advantages by reducing carbon emissions. a major plus with a climate crisis looming over us.

With all of this in mind, it’s easy to see how electric bikes are worth investing in. economically and socially.

How E-Bikes Are Changing the Active Travel Business

A small boost can lead to incredible possibilities.

E-bikes make it easier for travelers to venture further than ever before with less effort – essentially taking the strain out of sightseeing and commuting.

Riders can keep pace with cars on even steep hills or head off the beaten path without breaking a sweat.

For cyclists intimidated by steep hills or just want to spend less energy pushing a traditional bicycle uphill, an e-bike offers freedom like never before.

An e-bike lets you travel further with less exertion, opening endless possibilities on long-distance bike tours.

They are fast, fun, and very efficient.

Cyclists who have had to stop biking long distances or rough terrain for any reason have found a renewed opportunity by jumping on an electric bike.

But these bikes aren’t just useful for travelers looking to put in the miles on long distance tours and week-long trips.

They’re an increasingly popular option for day trips too, simply because you get the same hands-on experience but can pack more into your trip.

E-bikes can help breathe new life into cycling as they take the fear out of long-distance travel and make those daunting hills and roads a piece of cake for cyclists of all experiences.

E-Bikes Can Be Used where Hiking Is Impossible

The allure of mountain and off-road biking is the thrill of exploring rugged terrain that is usually unreachable by car.

The chasms, cliffs, and steep hills are a challenge to any rider, but electric-powered bikes make it easy to conquer those steep elevations.

For cyclists looking to enjoy spectacular scenery on a mountain trail, regular mountain bikes are often simply unusable because they do not manage steep inclines well.

E-bikes are an excellent way to make milder slopes accessible even for those who aren’t confident in their ability to take on more extreme hills that regular mountain bikes won’t be able to handle.

E-Bikes Can Be Used In Cities Where Cycling Is Not Possible

If you’ve ever tried to cycle around a busy city, then you know it’s challenging.

There are endless obstacles to worry about, like cars that often end up being parked on the street, pedestrians doing what pedestrians do, and bicycle lanes that don’t seem to make any sense!

Way too often, cyclists are forced to merge back onto the sidewalk because they’ve run out of space or can’t cycle at all with so many people walking around.

Electric bicycles allow cyclists to bypass traffic, navigate busy and congested areas, and get around popular destinations much faster.

E-Bikes Make Travelling Accessible

E-bikes are like having a personal transport system that is always there for you: and one that is efficient, reliable, and enjoyable.

The convenience factor of an e-bike is hard to deny: with one charge, you can often reach distances far beyond what could be achieved by cycling alone.

Without needing specialist experience, anyone can use an e-bike to scale mountains and traverse previously inaccessible terrain with ease.

You can take on all challenges at your own pace while at the end of the day, still having enough in tank to enjoy the destination you worked so hard to get to.

Most travelers have their first encounter with electric bikes on a long-distance tour.

Most who opt for an e-bike are new to biking tours, often coming on the trip with a more experienced friend or group.

And generally, after trying one, or seeing someone in their group having a great experience, most people opt for an e-bike over their regular bike on longer trips.

Even if it might feel like you’re swallowing your pride on your first trip, electric bicycles are slowly changing people’s approach to active travel and will soon be a viable choice for most people.

However, many people don’t know that just like cars and motorcycles, there are a lot of of e-bikes out there to choose from.

E-bikes Make Pedalling Easier.

As the weather warms ups and cycling season gains momentum, the warm temperatures can zap your energy on a long trip.

And if you’re an avid cyclist, you know that the extra effort of pedaling across certain terrains and hills can be pretty frustrating, but that is all changing now that e-bikes have been designed to make pedaling easier.

Most E-bikes are fitted with a power switch where you can change the settings from “Eco” to “Turbo mode” for when you need a little more assistance or to catch a breather when taking on steep inclines.

Throttle mode v pedal assist.

Most electric-powered bicycles typically use a combination of different methods to power them.

They are usually either pedal-assist or they use a throttle (where a motor kicks in to help you go faster)

When looking for an e-bike, pick the right one that works for you.

If you suffer from knee or foot issues and don’t want to FOCUS on pedaling, you can use a throttle-only bike.

But for those who worry about getting too much assistance from the bike and not being active, you can still pedal just like a normal bike and keep the assists for the tough terrains where it is needed.

What To Look For In An E-bike

The distance an electric bike can travel is the most important consideration when using an e-bike.

There are two key factors that determine how far an electric bike can travel.

The capacity of the battery. The efficiency of the bike.

It charges just like a mobile phone by connecting the battery pack to an electrical outlet and generally gets a full charge in around 3 hours.

How Long Does It Take To Charge An Electric Bike?

In my experience, it takes 3-4 hours to fully charge an e-bike battery.

Typically, a battery will last for anywhere between 30 – 70 miles on a full charge, but if you manage your power well enough, it can last longer.

The type of terrain and power needed will have an effect on your battery life so it can be important to plan ahead when tackling large hills and rough roads where you need a lot of assistance.

Some bikes allow you to choose different levels of assist to prioritize speed or battery life, which can help you manage battery life on a longer trip.

Here are some approximate charging times for different types of batteries to get an idea of what you can expect on more powerful e-bikes:

electric, bike, conversion, kits

500-watt hours (0.5 kWh) battery: 2-4 hours. 750-watt hours (0.75 kWh) battery: 3-6 hours. 1,000-watt hours (1 kWh) battery: 4-8 hours. 1,500-watt hours (1.5 kWh) battery: 6-12 hours.

And all-in-all, the cost to fully charge an electric bike comes in at around 5-15 cents. So, if it takes 500-watt hours (0.5 kWh) to charge the battery, and you are being charged 0.10/kWh for electricity, it would cost about 5 cents to charge the battery.

Knowing the type of trips you’ll be taking ahead of time will help determine which option is best for you.

Also, it’s important to consider the terrain when considering the battery range.

Hills require more power, so your battery will drain faster or get a little more use, so make sure your bike has enough power to tackle any potential challenges!

Although some e-bikes now allow you to choose different levels of assistance to prioritize speed or battery life, which can help you manage battery life on a longer trip.

Are Electric Bikes Faster Than Your Regular Bicycle?

Electric bicycles are always seeing technological advancements, particularly with how the hidden motor inside makes the entire bike run.

But does that mean that they are faster than your normal bicycle?

Not necessarily, as e-bikes are usually restricted with the top speed they can assist you with.

Currently, the assists will help you up to 32 km/h in the US and 25 km/h in most of Europe.

However, the max speed varies depending on the laws within the country you are in as well as the class of model you are using.

How Heavy Are E-bikes?

Many people have the misconception that e-bikes are heavy.

This is not the case. In fact, the average weight of an electric bicycle is 20 kg. The motor, battery, and frame material being the heaviest components.

Lighter bikes are easier to maneuver but heavier ones tend to last longer and come with more accessories like storage racks, headlights etc.

Make sure whatever model you choose fits comfortably within your budget while also providing all the features that matter most to you.

And think about your own comfort too; look for adjustable handlebars and seats and shock-absorbing forks that can provide extra cushioning over bumpy roads.

E-bikes are quite popular with travelers on long trips looking to carry heavier loads, typically for camping or when traveling with a family and needing that extra gear.

Depending on what you are packing can depend on the type of bike you need.

But when traveling with us at BikeHike we always have a support vehicle on hand to take your excess luggage and anything you don’t need on your bike journey so you never have to worry about packing too much.

Health Benefits Of E-Bikes

E-bikes are great for exercise, as they will improve your leg muscles and your cardiovascular system.

They are more environmentally friendly, too, as they emit less CO2 than cars, and don’t require the maintenance that cars require.

They are even easier to maintain than your regular bike while traveling since they have fewer moving parts.

The benefits of electric bikes are many, including the reduced pollution of fossil fuels, the resulting reduced carbon footprint, and the ability to enjoy traveling with less effort.

Are E-bikes Safe?

The short answer is yes; they are safer than regular bicycles due to how they are designed.

They utilize an in-line electric motor powered by a battery, which takes the place of traditional pedaling, and this makes them very safe to ride on the road and ultimately gives you even more control.

A study from Portland University found that 60% of owners felt safer riding an electric bike, and 42% of riders felt they had helped them avoid accidents.

E-bike With Us

Get hands-on with the advantages of an E-bike with our Croatia to Montenegro trip.

Experience the ride of a lifetime through Croatia, Bosnia, and Montenegro and tackle the scenic mountainous regions of the Balkans where you will use your electric pedal assists to their full potential to tackle these tough terrains, all while soaking in the magnificent views and rich heritage of each destination.

No matter where your travels may take you, an e-bike can help make life easier and more fun.

Whatever your reason for choosing an e-bike, you can always expect to get the same amount of enjoyment out of it as your traditional bike.

And with its combination of convenience, sustainability, and affordability, investing in an electric bicycle can truly be worth every penny spent!

About The Author

Trish Sare is the owner of BikeHike and a passionate outdoor enthusiast with over 30 years of experience as a world traveler. She’s lived, traveled, and guided extensively in North, South and Central America, Europe, Oceania, Africa, and Asia. She has guided and helped to develop every one of our multi-sport holidays. In her spare time, Trish is usually outdoors either mountain biking, hiking, sea kayaking, trail running, or climbing. Trish has a passion for the world and all of the amazing cultures that inhabit it and does her best to immerse herself directly into their distinctive lifestyles.

What is an electric bike and how do they work?

Whether you’re ditching the car by cycling to work or want an easier ride to the top of trails, an electric bike can offer many of the benefits of a non-assisted bike, with motorised power on tap when you need it.

Electric bike technology has advanced at a pace in recent years and you can now find pretty much any type of bike with a motor. We have guides to the best electric road bikes, best electric gravel bikes and best electric mountain bikes.

If you don’t want to buy a whole new bike, the best electric bike conversion kits will transform your purely pedal-powered bike into an electric bike. In this general guide to electric bikes, we’ll explain exactly what an ebike is, how an electric bike works, how to ride an ebike and answer some of the key questions you may have before buying.

What is an electric bike?

An electric bike has a built-in motor and battery to assist your pedalling. Oliver Woodman / Immediate Media

An electric bike, or ebike, is a bicycle equipped with an electric bike motor to assist you when you’re pedalling. The motor will get its power from a rechargeable battery mounted on the bike. To classify as an ebike, the motor has to help you rather than propel you on its own. As a result, you need to pedal to get that assistance. How much power the motor delivers is regulated based on how hard you are pedalling and the level of support you have selected. Electric bike systems offer a number of modes to choose from, allowing you to balance the amount of power supplied through the pedals with range and battery life.

Electric bike assistance is restricted to 15.5mph in the UK, EU and Australia. Russell Burton / Our Media

Electric bike laws on how much help the motor can provide, and the speed at which assistance cuts out, vary around the world. But in general the motor is limited to 250 watts output and must cut out when your speed reaches 25kph/15.5mph, except in the USA where it can continue to work up to 20mph. You can go faster than that, of course, but only under your own effort – the bike’s motor will no longer provide assistance.

  • must have a maximum power output of 250 watts
  • should not be able to propel the bike when it’s travelling more than 15.5mph

How does an electric bike work?

An electric bike will typically have a motor housed either centrally on the bike (often referred to as a mid-drive motor, powered through the cranks) or on the front or rear hub.

Whereas a hub-based motor will push the wheel around directly, an axle-mounted motor will work through the ebike’s chain and gears.

When you pedal, a torque sensor will measure how much effort you are putting in and match that to the motor’s power output.

The idea is that the motor won’t completely take over; instead, you should get consistent power delivery that won’t send the bike lurching forward.

Therefore, one of many benefits of riding an electric bike is you still have to press on the pedals and get exercise. Riding an electric bike for fitness is eminently possible.

Power comes from the battery, which might be mounted on the outside of the frame or hidden within it.

Many batteries can be removed for charging, although others need to be charged on the bike. If that’s the case, you need to have somewhere to park the bike near a power socket.

There will be a controller for the motor, usually mounted on the handlebar or integrated within the frame, that lets you decide how much assistance you want, and to keep an eye on the battery level. Some will include a screen with navigation and other functions too.

Electric bike motors are held either in the middle of the bike, as shown here, or in one of the wheel hubs. Russell Burton / Our Media

Bosch, Shimano, Yamaha, Specialized, Mahle, FSA and Fazua all make popular ebike motors. Specifications can vary significantly and the type of motor found on a bike will depend on its price and the type of riding intended.

For example, an electric road bike is more likely to favour a lightweight system with smooth power delivery, whereas a motor on a high-spec electric mountain bike is likely to offer more torque for off-road capability.

How do you regulate motor power?

You can usually alter the level of assistance with a frame-mounted button, as pictured here, or a controller on the handlebar. Russell Burton / Our Media

An electric bike will usually have between three and five levels of assistance, selected via its controller.

These can give you anything from a gentle push to lots of power for tackling steep off-road climbs, depending on the specifications of the bike’s motor.

Some will also have a ‘boost’ button, which you can use to increase the power output for short bursts of additional power.

Many bikes also offer a walk-assist mode, to make it easier to push when you’re off the bike.

You can change between assistance levels as you ride and there’s usually the option to switch the motor off completely and ride under pedal power alone.

Many ebike motors are designed to be drag-free when switched off, but there is still the additional weight to overcome.

How much weight do the motor and battery add?

Electric bikes are heavier than non-assisted bikes and there’s a wide variation in the weight of ebike motors and batteries.

The lightest systems come in at less than 4kg and are typically found on electric road bikes, but most systems weigh around 6 to 8kg – and sometimes more.

The additional mounting points and frame reinforcement required on an electric bike can add some extra weight, too.

The weight of your system will depend partly on budget, but also the intended use of the bike.

Bikes that require lots of power, for example, an electric cargo bike or e-MTB, are more likely to have a heavier motor and battery package.

An electric road bike requires less assistance and will prioritise lighter weight.

The latest e-road bikes are near-indistinguishable from non-motorised bikes, thanks to the sleek, integrated design of the motor and battery.

The extra weight associated with electric bikes is worth bearing in mind if you need to lift or carry your machine anywhere.

If that’s the case, consider how much extra weight you can comfortably handle.

However, for day-to-day riding, the benefits of having a motor should trump any extra weight, particularly when it comes to climbing… unless you run out of battery.

How do you ride an electric bike?

Riding an electric bike is pretty much like riding a non-motorised bike of the same type.

You switch on the motor, select the assistance level you want using the controller, and then pedal. The motor will make initial acceleration much easier and then help you keep up to speed, particularly when you need to climb a hill.

However, because of the extra weight from the motor and battery, an electric bike may handle a bit more sluggishly than a non-assisted bike.

It may also have wider tyres to carry the extra weight and provide more grip, and it will usually have disc brakes because there’s more mass to slow down and stop.

What range will an electric bike have?

The motor type and battery capacity, plus your riding style and the terrain, all influence the range. Russell Burton / Immediate Media

Batteries on electric bikes can give you a range of anything from 20 to 100 miles or more on a full charge, depending on their capacity (measured in watt-hours and abbreviated to Wh). Batteries are expensive, so an ebike with a longer range will, in general, cost more.

You’ll usually get a battery-level indicator, while some control systems will give you an estimated range as you ride or regulate the power output to let you achieve your planned ride distance.

Some ebikes let you plug in a second battery, which might fit in a bottle cage, to up range. You can also lower the assistance level during a ride to help conserve the battery and extend the bike’s range.

While many brands will offer an estimated range for a particular model of bike, and it is possible to gauge a bike’s theoretical range based on its motor power and battery capacity, ultimately it depends on the level of assistance you’re using and the terrain.

Fully recharging the battery from the mains can take anything from around three hours up to nine hours, or more depending on the model, charger and battery capacity.

What types of electric bike are there?

We’ve got a separate guide to electric bike types, but you can find almost any kind of bike with a motor.

The most common types of electric bikes are hybrids and mountain bikes.

The best electric hybrid bikes have flat bars and chunky, puncture-resistant tyres, useful for biking to work, shopping and more leisurely rides.

They may also have mudguards (or the eyelets to add full-length mudguards), a rack and lights, and sometimes have a step-through frame design to make it easier to hop on and off the bike.

Electric mountain bikes normally have a beefy motor with a high torque output to help you get up loose off-road climbs and over obstacles. Once you get to the top, the motor can be turned off to enjoy the downhill ride.

There’s also a growing number of electric road bikes. With drop handlebars, they’re designed to ride fast and are usually relatively lightweight (as far as electric bikes go), to help with handling and hill climbing.

Electric gravel bikes are designed to be capable off-road and fast on tarmac. Russell Burton / Our Media

There’s an increasing number of electric gravel bikes, too. With wider tyres to enable you to ride off-road with confidence and drop handlebars for road speed, e-gravel bikes are designed to offer the versatility to really broaden your riding.

The best electric folding bikes will be designed for versatility and compact size. They can be folded up to take on public transport or for easier storage at home/work, so they could be the best bike for commuting for many people.

There are also electric cargo bikes, designed to carry loads for deliveries around town and other day-to-day tasks where they can replace a car or van.

Whichever electric bike you choose, we suggest you read our guides to electric bike insurance and electric bike maintenance to look after what’s likely to be a sizeable investment.

In short, if you want a helping hand on your ride, you can find an electric bike to suit your needs.

  • Whatsapp
  • Reddit
  • Email to a friend

Paul Norman

Paul has been writing about bike tech and reviewing all things cycling for almost a decade. He had a five-year stint at Cycling Weekly and has also written for titles including CyclingNews, Cyclist and BikePerfect, as well as being a regular contributor to BikeRadar. Tech-wise, he’s covered everything from rim width to the latest cycling computers. He reviewed some of the first electric bikes for Cycling Weekly and has covered their development into the sophisticated machines they are today, on the way becoming an expert on all things electric. Paul was into gravel before it was even invented, riding a cyclocross bike across the South Downs and along muddy paths through the Chilterns. He dabbled in cross-country mountain biking too. He’s most proud of having covered the length of the South Downs Way on a crosser and fulfilling his long-time ambition to climb Monte Grappa on a road bike

Leave a Comment