City of Alexandria, VA. E bike scooter city

E bike scooter city

Boost your ride! Our ebikes have pedal-assist technology that gives you the power to go farther and faster—without breaking a sweat.

Ride like a superhero

With speeds up to 18 MPH, these custom pedal-assist ebikes give you the power to tackle bridges, shave time off your commute, and experience more neighborhoods in less time. Just start pedaling and the power kicks in.

How to ride

Unlock an ebike. Use the Citi Bike or Lyft app and look for the ⚡ symbol.

Feel the power. Pedal-assist technology automatically kicks in once you’re riding — no need to press a button. We keep things simple with a single gear.

Dock as usual. Park at any station in Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, Jersey City or Hoboken.

Price by the minute

Annual Members pay an extra 0.17/minute, capped at 3 for rides 45 minutes or less that enter or exit Manhattan.

Non-Members pay 0.26/minute.Reduced Fare Bike Share Members pay 0.06/minute.

Happy (and safe) riding!

We always recommend that you wear a helmet, brake gradually with both hands, and be cautious in traffic when riding an ebike.

Go for a ride today

To find a Citi Bike ebike, just download the Citi Bike mobile app, look for the ⚡ symbol on the map, and get ready to experience New York in a whole new way.

Learn more about the Citi Bike ebike

Citi Bike, Citi Bike and Arc Design and the Blue Wave are registered service marks of Citigroup Inc.

We at Citi Bike strive to provide access to our services to all individuals, including through an accessible website. If you have questions, Комментарии и мнения владельцев, or encounter any difficulty in using this site, please submit feedback via: citibikenyc.com/accessibility-feedback

City of Alexandria, VA

Make the most of Alexandria’s outstanding quality of life with information and services of interest to residents.

Are you ready? Find resources and information to help residents, businesses and visitors to prepare for all types of emergencies, and to stay safe.

Learn more about pets and animals, schools and libraries, parks and farmers’ markets, community gardens, and more.

There are many opportunities to get involved to help better the City of Alexandria. Opportunities include serving on a Board, Commission or Committee, providing input on a new City project or speaking at a City Council meeting.

Information on how to get to and through the City of Alexandria, including walking, biking, bus, rail, air, ridesharing, and more.

Historic Alexandria is a treasure trove of early structures, artifacts, and records that creates a unique way of life for its citizens and provides enjoyment for thousands of people who visit this special community every year. The City continues to add resources to its collection of local and nationally designated historic districts.

Find out whether a permit is required, the type of permit needed, fees involved, and what requirements are necessary for the activity you want to engage in Alexandria.

Information about parking in the City of Alexandria, including parking options, enforcement, districts and permits.

Alexandria is committed to ensuring our residents thrive through physical, mental, and social health.

city, alexandria, bike, scooter

Agencies and programs that help maintain our safety and overall quality of life. These links contain information about the City of Alexandria’s law enforcement agencies and public safety organizations, courts and judicial system.

Learn more about how the City maintains streets, sidewalks, bridges, and other infrastructure in the City.

The City collects car and real estate taxes, maintains tax relief programs and assesses property values. Taxes can be paid in a variety of ways including online, by phone and by mail.

Did you know that ACPS is one of the most diverse school systems in the country? Our students come from more than 80 different countries, speak more than 60 languages, and represent a myriad of ethnic and cultural groups. The Alexandria Library is an educational, user-oriented service institution providing free public access to recorded knowledge and ideas.

The City provides public assistance as a safety net for individuals and families, including help with homelessness prevention, food, rent, utilities, medical coverage and prescriptions, job training and placement assistance, and much more.

The City of Alexandria does not operate any public utilities. The following companies are the primary providers of their respective service:

Whether you live here or are just visiting, Alexandria is a great place to shop, dine, take in the arts, get outdoors, and just have fun.

If you are looking for small-town charm and big-city amenities, Alexandria is the place to find them. Alexandria has a fascinating history, and many of its historic buildings are still preserved today. The City’s many historic homes, churches, businesses, and museums allow residents and visitors alike to experience the past that makes it the charming town it is today.

Through engaging the community, encouraging participation, and facilitating access to arts and culture, the City builds a vibrant community for its residents, workers, and visitors.

Find events and activities, shops and restaurants, concerts and performances, arts and culture, historic attractions, parks and libraries, farmers’ markets, and more.

Information on how to get to and through the City of Alexandria, including walking, biking, bus, rail, air, ridesharing, and more.

Alexandria is a desirable location to live, work and play. The City owns many of the premier historic sites in Alexandria and it is charged with the conservation, interpretation and promotion of these links to the past.

Alexandria is an active community that offers more than 900 acres of parks and dedicated public space, and a wide variety of neighborhood and recreation centers, pools, dog parks, farmers’ markets, waterfront activities and more.

Information about visiting Alexandria, including shopping, dining, attractions, accommodations, events listings and more. Plan your visit with an itinerary builder, interactive maps, hotel booking, online restaurant reservations and much more.

We are here to serve you. Browse the topics to the right to learn more about the programs and services we offer.

Connect with professional and knowledgeable staff for City service and information requests from every City department.

The City provides services to residents, businesses, contractors, and visitors needing permits for constructions and other developments.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) centrally manages, shares and analyzes information about locations through specialized mapping technology. This information increases transparency, improves many City technology applications and provides critical data to decision makers and the public.

Alexandria is an active community that offers more than 900 acres of parks and dedicated public space, and a wide variety of neighborhood and recreation centers, pools, dog parks, farmers’ markets, waterfront activities and more.

Alexandria is committed to ensuring our residents thrive through physical, mental, and social health.

Agencies and programs that help maintain our safety and overall quality of life. These links contain information about the City of Alexandria‘s law enforcement agencies and public safety organizations, courts and judicial system.

Learn more about how the City maintains streets, sidewalks, bridges, and other infrastructure in the City.

The City collects car and real estate taxes, maintains tax relief programs and assesses property values. Taxes can be paid in a variety of ways including online, by phone and by mail.

The City provides public assistance as a safety net for individuals and families, including help with homelessness prevention, food, rent, utilities, medical coverage and prescriptions, job training and placement assistance, and much more.

Information on how to get to and through the City of Alexandria, including walking, biking, bus, rail, air, ridesharing, and more.

Ideally located just across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., Alexandria is nationally recognized as one of the best places to live and do business on the east coast. Learn how we can help you start or relocate your business in Alexandria, and access resources for existing businesses and commuters.

The City provides services and resources to help existing businesses expand within the City and promotes recruiting new businesses in Alexandria.

Alexandria offers wide range of job opportunities and services. Work for City government or City Public Schools, find out about an internship opportunity or learn about workforce development and career training options.

Find out whether a permit is required, the type of permit needed, fees involved, and what requirements are necessary for the activity you want to engage in Alexandria.

The City collects car and real estate taxes, maintains tax relief programs and assesses property values. Taxes can be paid in a variety of ways including online, by phone and by mail.

Information on how to get to and through the City of Alexandria, including walking, biking, bus, rail, air, ridesharing, and more.

The Alexandria City Council is composed of a Mayor and six Council members who are elected at-large for three-year terms. The Mayor, who is chosen on a separate ballot, presides over meetings of the Council and serves as the ceremonial head of government.

The City of Alexandria has a strong commitment to citizen participation as evidenced by the number of citizen boards and commissions established by City Council. These bodies compose a formal system through which citizens can advise City Council on all major issues affecting the City.

View a list of City departments, offices and other agencies, and learn about their role in the organization.

Information about the City of Alexandria’s law enforcement agencies and public safety organizations, courts and judicial system.

Alexandria voters elect a Mayor and City Council and three local officers, as well as state and federal representatives.

There are many opportunities to get involved to help better the City of Alexandria. Opportunities include serving on a Board, Commission or Committee, providing input on a new City project or speaking at a City Council meeting.

The City government acts with integrity in an open process, and provides timely access to clear, trustworthy information, presented and employed by all parties from the beginning to the end of the process, including the reasoning that leads to and supports the policy conclusion.

Much of our work involves creating and improving infrastructure and planning for the future. Learn more about major projects and plans here, and how you can get involved!

There’s always something to do in Alexandria! Browse community events, government meetings and activities, and important deadlines.

Dockless Mobility

The City of Alexandria launched a permanent program to allow private companies to operate shared mobility devices (such as dockless bicycles and scooters available for rent) in the City under an annual permit.

Slow Zone Pilot Program

The City is launching a slow zone for dockless scooters and e-bikes and would like the public’s feedback on this pilot program. Beginning February 21 and running through May 21, the City will institute a slow zone that limits the speed of dockless scooters and e-bikes used in the Robinson Landing neighborhood of Old Town. Slow zones are designated areas with top speeds that are below the established City limit of 15 mph; they are often used to improve street and sidewalk safety along heavily trafficked corridors.

Evaluating the use of dockless slow zones to address conflicts between riders and pedestrians in high-activity areas was one of the recommendations in the 2019 evaluation report for Alexandria’s Dockless Mobility program.

The pilot slow zone will have an 8 mile-per-hour speed limit on neighborhood streets, Point Lumley Park, and the nearby pedestrian walkway and promenade. GPS technology will be used to enforce the speed limits.

Alexandria residents, businesses, and visitors are encouraged to provide feedback through Sunday, May 21, the final day of the pilot. City staff will review the responses and consider them in determining the next steps for the Robinson Landing slow zones and the suitability of slow zones in other locations in Alexandria.

Public Routes Dashboard

A Citywide heatmap and ridership data for shared mobility devices, including total trips, average number of trips per day, average trip distance, and average trip duration, may be found on the Public Routes Dashboard.

What’s New

In November 2021, the City Council approved a permanent Dockless Mobility program. Pursuant to City Code, the City has established an overall cap for the number of dockless mobility devices in the City of 1,200 scooters and 800 e-bikes. This cap on devices can be modified in the future as needed. The program requirements for the current permit year may be found here. The following companies have been approved for permits to operate in Alexandria through March 31, 2024:

  • Bird. 450 Scooters, 100 E-bikes
  • Lime. 205 Scooters, 100 E-bikes
  • Link/Superpedestrian. 285 Scooters
  • Spin. 260 Scooters

Ad Hoc Scooter Task Force

In July 2021, staff shared a written update to City Council on the status of the Phase II Pilot Program, including input from the community collected through FOCUS groups, the Ad Hoc Scooter Task Force, and meetings with key stakeholder boards, commissions, etc. The written update to Council can be found here. information about the Task Force can be found here.

Phase II Pilot Program

During the 2019 Phase I Dockless Pilot Program, the City worked through challenges and made some adjustments to better manage the program. From January to December 2019, there were around 286,000 scooter trips made in Alexandria. However, issues such as improper parking, unsafe riding, and reporting are challenges that require additional regulation and oversight. In order for the City to continue to (and more strictly) regulate scooter companies and riders, a Phase II Pilot Program with additional recommendations was approved and completed. Key changes from the first pilot included:

  • equitable distribution of scooters across the City
  • A ban on riding scooters on any sidewalk in the City
  • Establishment of an Ad-Hoc Scooter Task-Force
  • Stricter requirements of scooter companies including data sharing requirements and increased permit fees
  • Installation of additional parking corrals

Materials from the City Council meeting that provide more details on the Staff-proposed changes can be viewed here. The Dockless Mobility Pilot Evaluation Report summarizes key findings and draft recommendations from the 2019 Pilot findings and data.

The purpose of the Phase II Pilot was to evaluate changes made from Phase I, engage with the community, determine whether the City should have a permanent program, and identify the most appropriate permitting or procurement process for such a program.

City Council approved a resolution to extend the Phase II Pilot through 2021 to allow for more outreach and community engagement. The 2020 MOU was amended to authorize the extension of the pilot and required operators to meet the requirements of the terms of the 2020 MOU in 2021.

Permits for operation in 2021 were issued to Lime, Bird, Helbiz, and Link. The permitting process for 2022 is underway. All operators are required to sign the 2020 Memorandum of Understanding, which described the City’s requirements and expectations.

Phase I Pilot Program

Information about the Phase I Pilot Program can be found here. The Dockless Mobility Pilot Evaluation Report summarizes key findings and draft recommendations from the 2019 Pilot findings and data.

Providing Feedback and Asking Questions

If you have a question about the permanent dockless mobility program, please submit your comment via Alex311 (keyword: scooters), and staff will respond to you within the designated timeframe. If you need to provide immediate feedback on an improperly parked scooter, please see Question #4 in the FAQs below.

Equity and Access

Bird, Lime, Link, and Veo provide low cost plans for riders who qualify:

Each company also provides non-smartphone access (SMS or call to unlock devices) and non-credit card payment options.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Which companies are allowed to operate in Alexandria?

Bird, Lime, Link, and Spin are currently permitted to operate in Alexandria through March 31, 2024.

Where can I ride a scooter or e-bike?

Scooter and e-bike riding is not permitted on sidewalks per City Code, but is allowed on streets, in bike lanes, and certain trails. Riders must follow all applicable traffic laws and should always ride safely, considerately.

Who is in charge of the shared mobility devices?

Individual private companies operate and maintain the shared mobility devices.

How do I report bikes or scooters that are left on my property or in another inappropriate location?

You should report the device through Alex311 with the location of the device, the company it belongs to, the device ID number (if possible), and why you are reporting it. You may also upload a picture. The more information that can be provided in the report, the faster the device can be recovered. Your report will be sent to the operator specified in the report. Additionally, contact information for each company is provided on the devices, and below.

2023 Operators

  • Bird e-scooters (black and white): 866.205.2442 or hello@bird.co
  • Lime e-scooters (green and white): 888.546.3345 or support@li.me
  • Link e-scooters (grey and yellow): 844.701.8163 or support@superpedestrian.com
  • Spin e-scooters (black and orange): 888.249.9698 or support@spin.pm

Operators no longer permitted in Alexandria

  • Bolt e-scooters (black and yellow): 866.265.8143 or support@micromobility.com
  • JUMP e-scooters (black and red): 888.546.3345 or online request form
  • Lyft e-scooters (pink and black): 877.452.6699 or online request form
  • Razor e-scooters (red and black): 833.5278.6453, Sharesupport@razorusa.com
  • Helbiz e-scooters (black and white) and Skip by Helbiz e-scooters (blue and white): 888.974.9074 or support@helbiz.com

Where should e-bikes or scooters be parked?

Devices should be parked in a way that does not impede pedestrian or ADA access with a minimum of three feet of travel space. Do not park on private property or anywhere that cannot be accessed by other users. Additionally, devices should not block access to sidewalks, ramps, entrances to buildings, fire hydrants, bus stops, parked cars, travel lanes, and driveways.

Follow these videos on how to appropriately park scooters or e-bikes:

city, alexandria, bike, scooter

What do I do if a bike or scooter is parked inappropriately?

If they are parked on your private property, or somewhere that impedes access, you may move the device to a more appropriate location yourself, if possible, or report the device through Alex311.

Is dockless bikeshare part of Capital Bikeshare?

No. Capital Bikeshare is jointly owned and operated by the City of Alexandria, District of Columbia, Arlington County, Fairfax County, City of Falls Church, Montgomery County, and Prince George’s County. These shared mobility devices are not affiliated with Capital Bikeshare.

How do I sign up to use a shared mobility device?

Visit the website/mobile app of the company. You will need a separate account from Capital Bikeshare as there is no affiliation between the two.

How many devices can each company deploy?

Each company is permitted to deploy a certain number of device based on each permit agreement. The City-wide cap is 1200 scooters and 800 e-bikes. Through March 31, 2024, the permitted devices for each company is as follows:

  • Bird. 450 Scooters, 100 E-bikes
  • Lime. 205 Scooters, 100 E-bikes
  • Link/Superpedestrian. 285 Scooters
  • Spin. 260 Scooters

Click here for the results of the end-of-pilot e-scooter survey‍

Electric scooters in Hoboken. continuing a tradition of national leadership in shared mobility.

As one of the most densely populated and transit-rich communities in the United States, the City of Hoboken is constantly looking for ways to improve access for residents and visitors to homes, businesses, and other destinations without increasing vehicle congestion. The city published Climate Action Plan, which sets a roadmap for mitigating Climate Change’s impact and reducing greenhouse gas emissions across Hoboken, recommended implementing transportation-related initiatives that include expanding shared mobility programs in Hoboken. The existing bike share program, JerseyBike, and car sharing program, Corner Car, have made Hoboken New Jersey’s leader in shared mobility. Additionally, these programs, particularly, JerseyBike, help to solve first- and last-mile transportation challenges. New technology, including electric scooters (e-scooters), continues to provide opportunities to sustainably solve these mobility needs in Hoboken.

In May 2019, Governor Murphy signed legislation legalizing low-speed electric vehicles, including electric bikes and scooters. Shortly after, Hoboken launched New Jersey’s first e-scooter sharing program with a six-month pilot that will offer shared e-scooters through mid-November 2019. This page offers important information about rules and regulations surrounding e-scooter use and the e-scooter share pilot in Hoboken.

Click here for the results of the end-of-pilot e-scooter survey‍

Electric scooters in Hoboken. continuing a tradition of national leadership in shared mobility.

As one of the most densely populated and transit-rich communities in the United States, the City of Hoboken is constantly looking for ways to improve access for residents and visitors to homes, businesses, and other destinations without increasing vehicle congestion. The city published Climate Action Plan, which sets a roadmap for mitigating Climate Change’s impact and reducing greenhouse gas emissions across Hoboken, recommended implementing transportation-related initiatives that include expanding shared mobility programs in Hoboken. The existing bike share program, JerseyBike, and car sharing program, Corner Car, have made Hoboken New Jersey’s leader in shared mobility. Additionally, these programs, particularly, JerseyBike, help to solve first- and last-mile transportation challenges. New technology, including electric scooters (e-scooters), continues to provide opportunities to sustainably solve these mobility needs in Hoboken.

In May 2019, Governor Murphy signed legislation legalizing low-speed electric vehicles, including electric bikes and scooters. Shortly after, Hoboken launched New Jersey’s first e-scooter sharing program with a six-month pilot that will offer shared e-scooters through mid-November 2019. This page offers important information about rules and regulations surrounding e-scooter use and the e-scooter share pilot in Hoboken.

Applicable Rules and Regulations

Several state and local laws govern electric scooter usage in Hoboken. Specifically, local ordinances regulate electric scooters in the following ways:

Where to ride: E-scooter users are required to ride in the street and are permitted to ride in the city’s bike lanes and on multi-use paths. All e-scooter users must yield to pedestrians and other slower-moving street users.

Where to park: E-scooters must park at either bike racks or on the sidewalk in the furnishing zone (the area of the sidewalk closest to the curb that provides space for items such as bus shelters, benches, street trees, and utilities). The city, in partnership with electric scooter operators, is gradually implementing designated scooter parking areas in the street or daylighting space at inbound legs of intersections. Never Park a scooter where it obstructs pedestrian access on sidewalks or at crosswalks. Any scooters parked in this area pose a safety hazard and limit mobility for pedestrians and people with disabilities and will be removed.

Riding on the sidewalk: E-scooter users are prohibited from riding on the sidewalk.

city, alexandria, bike, scooter

Speed limits: All e-scooters must obey a speed limit of 18 MPH.

Age restrictions: All e-scooter riders must be 18 years or older.

One rider per scooter: Only one person can ride an e-scooter at a time.

Rental restrictions: The terms of agreements with e-scooter share companies require that all rentals must be made by the rider of the scooter. ‍The use of helmets is strongly encouraged.

‍Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

How long did the e-scooter pilot last? It will last six months, approximately from May 20,2019 – November 20, 2019.

What will happen after the e-scooter pilot? The City of Hoboken will conduct a survey of riders and review usage data to develop a report and make recommendations for future e-scooter share programs.

Are e-scooters safe? Yes! Recent studies conducted in Portland, OR and Austin, TX concluded that e-scooters are the cause of no more injuries than bicycles and that a significant share of e-scooter related injuries could have been prevented by wearing a helmet. E-scooters weigh about as much as bike share bicycles and travel at similar speeds as human-powered bicycles.

Can I ride on the sidewalk? No, e-scooters must be ridden in the street only.

Can I ride on the Waterfront Walkway? Yes, however, there are some additional rules you should know: e-scooters are prohibited from the sections of the Waterfront Walkway where adjacent bicycle facilities are present. See the graphic below for more information about where those conditions exist. All scooters must obey a 8 MPH speed limit and ride in the area dedicated for bicyclists when available. If there is no dedicated bicycle lane or path, you must yield to slower Walkway users and audibly signal that you’re about to pass someone.

‍6. Can I ride in parks? No, riding an e-scooter in a park is prohibited.

‍7. Should I wear a helmet? Absolutely.

Are there e-scooter speed limits in Hoboken? Yes, e-scooters are prohibited from operating faster than 18 MPH in Hoboken.

Is there an age limit to ride an e-scooter? Anyone 18 or older can ride an e-scooter in Hoboken.

Where can I park an e-scooter? E-scooters can be parked at any bike rack, in designated parking areas if available, or in the furnishing zone of the sidewalk next to the curb. See the image above for more guidance.

How can I report e-scooter issues or concerns? Use Hoboken’s 311 to report issues or concerns with scooters.

Can I bring e-scooters on transit vehicles? E-scooters are currently prohibited from transit vehicles in Hoboken. Refer to NJ Transit, PATH, NY Waterways for specific restrictions on their vehicles and in stations.

Can I purchase my own electric scooter? Yes, you can purchase and operate your own e-scooter in Hoboken if it meets the legal requirements outlined in New Jersey state law.

Everything you need to know about scooters, bike share, dockless bikes in Los Angeles

e-bikes and scooters are on LA streets. Here’s how to ride them.

Dockless bikes! Smart bikes! Electric bikes! Scooters! Los Angeles is flooded with new options for getting around—they’re part of a new breed of transportation called “micromobility.”

These small vehicles are being touted as replacements for cars: They’re shared, sometimes electric-powered, easier to park, and take up less space on roads.

As these new bikes, e-bikes, and scooters made their way onto LA streets starting in 2017, the debate about whether these modes are sidewalk nuisances or gridlock saviors has dominated the narrative. LA lawmakers have passed regulations that allow companies with permits to operate in the city, and other Southern California cities, including Santa Monica, Long Beach, and Culver City, are implementing forward-thinking policies that might portend a real shift in the way Angelenos get around.

Since the the availability of these micromobility services as well as the regulations vary widely from city to city—and change dramatically from week to week—it’s important to learn what you’re in for before you get scootin’ or pedalin’. Here’s our guide for how to ride, where to go, and what you need to know.

Where can I ride dockless scooters?

The Metro Electric Bike pilot program debuted yesterday. 10 pedal assisted, electric bikes are available to all bike share riders. Find the bikes with the green icon in the app and website and ride the bikes for no extra charge during the pilot period! https://t.co/0hfgKhpNPo piccom/XROcrl9INz

— Metro Bike (@BikeMetro) November 9, 2018

If you want to take a dockless scooter for a ride, they’re now found throughout the city. But you’ll have the best variety as well as safety infrastructure for riding in Santa Monica.

On September 18, 2018 Santa Monica launched a new pilot program with four operators—Bird, Lime, Lyft, and Uber—managing the city’s e-bike and scooter share.

In addition to scooters from Bird and Lime, Uber launched Jump electric bikes in the city, and in October, launched Jump scooters.

Ride-hailing giant Lyft also debuted its scooters in Santa Monica along with an update to its app that helps users locate the scooters and get public transportation information. Lyft also acquired Motivate, the country’s largest bike-share operator, and will soon be debuting an e-bike in Santa Monica.

You can also look for scooters in Culver City, which is operating a pilot program, too. Long Beach, which has great riding infrastructure, also has its own scooter pilot.

Although many scooters have been migrating eastward from the beach, the problem with riding most places in LA is that there just aren’t enough protected lanes for riders to feel safe.

This is why many people choose to ride scooters on the sidewalk, even though you’re not supposed to. But sidewalk-riding can be dangerous for you, other users of the sidewalk, and cars pulling out of driveways that don’t expect to see someone whizzing by at 15 mph.

Where can’t I ride dockless scooters?

On September 4, 2018, the city of LA passed regulations on dockless systems, and in March 2019 began allowing companies with permits to put e-bikes and scooters on LA streets. The largest number of vehicles are found on LA’s Westside, Hollywood, Koreatown, and Downtown. Check out the app Scooter Map to see what’s near you.

The companies have detailed no-drop zones designated by the city where you can’t park vehicles, which are clearly marked in the apps. Be vigilant when ending your ride. If you see a vehicle parked improperly or try to use a vehicle that’s broken, you can report it using 311.

The city of Beverly Hills has made dockless electric scooters illegal—you can’t even ride one through city limits, so steer clear. The no-ride zone is clearly marked in all the apps, and riders are being ticketed. West Hollywood has banned the parking of scooters within city limits, but you’re allowed to ride through the city to get somewhere else.

Redesigning our @santamonicacity streets for a multi-modal future.First in-street drop zone for e-scooters e-bikes. piccom/bjRI0qOsBS

— Rick Cole (@SaMoCole) November 2, 2018

In Santa Monica, the city has put together a guide for riders. Avoid the beach path, where electric scooters of any type are not allowed. Riders are being ticketed and scooters impounded. Also, you cannot ride on the sidewalks anywhere in California, but in Santa Monica it’s heavily enforced. In downtown Santa Monica there are now designated in-street “drop zones” for scooters as well.

Get to know your local micromobility options

Dockless bikes: These are shared pedal bikes that don’t need to be “docked” at a station. You really can leave them anywhere that’s deemed to be accessible and safe. They just need to be parked in a way that’s not blocking the road, crosswalk, or sidewalk.Who to ride in LA: Lime

Dockless electric bikes: Shared electric bikes are like dockless bikes with a kick—these bikes use an electric motor that can boost your pedaling up to 15 mph. Also known as e-bikes, electric-assist bikes, and pedal-assist bikes.Who to ride in LA: Jump, Lime-E

Dockless throttle electric bikes: These are shared dockless vehicles that you can sit on like a bike, but they don’t have pedals. To navigate, you operate the throttle in the same way you operate a scooter.Who to ride in LA: Wheels

Smart bikes: Smart bikes are like dockless bikes but have a lock-to system that’s integrated into the bike. They don’t have to be docked in designated hubs—for a small surcharge, you can lock the bike anywhere within the system’s limits. Who to ride in LA: Breeze Bike Share, WeHo Pedals, Beverly Hills Bike Share, Bruin Bike Share, Long Beach Bike Share, Metro Bike on the westside only

Station-based bike share: This is the traditional model for bike share where you must dock the bike in one of the hubs. No app is needed, and you can use your TAP card to check one out.Who to ride in LA: Metro Bike

Station-based electric bikes: The same hub-based bikes-sharing system, but with electric bikes. Metro Bike currently has a dozen or so on the streets in LA—they’re white, so easy to spot.Who to ride in LA: Metro Bike

Dockless electric scooters: These are the scooters everyone’s talking about. They’re powered by electric motors that you control with a throttle. Who to ride in LA: Lime, Jump, Bird, Jump, Lyft, Spin, Razor

How far can I ride them?

As far as you want—kind of.

Technically you could ride Metro Bike anywhere you want as long as you dock it at a station when you’re done. You’ll just be charged for the time.

Similarly, the Bike Share Connect network, which encompasses much of the Westside, has very explicit boundaries outlined for where you can lock up its Smart bikes. If you lock up a bike outside of the boundary, you’ll be charged 20.

For electric scooters and electric bikes, you’re limited to geographic zones as noted in the app, or however long the battery lasts. Or until you reach the Santa Monica Mountains, whichever comes first.

Do I need to wear a helmet?

If you’re under 18, yes. Otherwise, check local laws.

A state law was passed in September 2018 that makes helmet use on scooters optional for anyone over 18. California cities will be able to set their own laws in 2019, although none in LA County have made such laws yet.

If you’re riding bike share or a shared e-bike, helmets are only required by law if you’re 17 or under. (If you’re 17 and under you’re not allowed to ride a shared electric scooter.)

Based on the types of injuries associated with people riding an unfamiliar transportation mode, a helmet is not a bad idea, especially if you’re riding on busy streets. If you register on Bird or Lime’s app, they’ll send you one for free.

Do I need any other gear?

Not really. The great part about the design of these bikes and scooters is that they’re designed to be used in regular clothes, even suits, skirts, and dresses. To minimize the potential of your toes getting scraped, you probably don’t want to wear sandals or flip flops, although a lot of people do.

All the bike share bikes have big baskets on the front of them where you can stash your belongings so you don’t even need a special type of bag or purse. Lime and Jump’s bikes have smartphone holders. Some scooters, like Razor’s seated ones, have a basket.

What apps do I need to download?

For most of LA’s micromobility options you’ll need to download an app to locate, unlock, and pay for your rides. To make the most of what LA has to offer, we suggest downloading these apps that will give you a range of options across the region.

Lime: The most expansive of the dockless companies, Lime has pedal bikes, electric-assist bikes, and dockless scooters across a very wide geographic area.

Bird: The Santa Monica-based startup has scooters to rent.

Spin: Yet another startup with scooters, which was bought by Ford.

Razor: Yes, the scooter of your youth now has dockless electric scooters.

Metro Bike: LA’s station-based system has hubs in Downtown, the Port of LA, and Venice. It’s easily the best way to get around Downtown. You can’t pay for rides on the app, but you can register your TAP card to pay for rides that way. You can also pay for walk-up rides at the station kiosks using a credit card.

Social Bicycles: Last year, Santa Monica, West Hollywood, Beverly Hills, and UCLA merged their Smart bike systems into the single Bike Share Connect network. Now you can use one bike booked through one app to ride from Hollywood to the beach and a fairly wide area in between. This app will give you access to the entire Bike Share Connect network, from Santa Monica to West Hollywood. You can also ride Long Beach’s bike share using the Social Bicycles app.

Uber: Yes, Uber is best known as a way to book rides in cars. But the app now shows Jump electric bikes and scooters where available.

Jump: The e-bike company that’s part of Uber also has its own app to find bikes and scooters.

Lyft: The ride-hailing app now offers directions to its scooters—and eventually its e-bikes—as well as public transit.

Transit: The trip-planning app can locate nearby dockless bikes and scooters, and provide a detailed multimodal itinerary as well as travel time estimates.

How much do bikes and scooters cost to rent?

Generally, all the systems cost 1 to 2 per ride, with additional fees based on the length—as in time—of your trip. There are also monthly and annual plans, and plans for students and employers.

Once you register for each service through an app, you’ll link a credit card to your account, which bills you every time you complete a ride.

All the bike share and scooter companies also have options for subsidized passes. These require applications and eligibility is based on income restrictions. Some also have passes for people who don’t use credit cards. Lime offers a local program where qualified members can get 100 pedal-bike rides for 5.

Can I use my Metro TAP card?

For Metro Bike and Bike Share Connect, yes! When you register your Metro Bike membership on your TAP card, it makes it especially easy to tap out a bike—you won’t even have to use an app. Registered TAP cards also work for Bike Share Connect Smart bikes.

The biggest news for Metro Bike is that fares have been slashed to 1.75 per trip, meaning rides are now the same cost as taking a Metro bus or train. Plus, since your Metro Bike account can be linked to your TAP card, you’ll soon be able to “transfer” from bus or rail to a bike, and vice versa, saving you even more money.

Can I ride my bike or scooter on the sidewalk?

If you’re riding a bike, technically, yes—in some cities in LA County. Use this LADOT guide to see where sidewalk-riding is allowed.

Most people don’t know this but riding a bike on the sidewalk is legal in the city of LA. The city acknowledges that sometimes the sidewalk is the safest place to ride on a busy street, and allows it, as long as bike riders do not endanger pedestrians.

California law says you can’t ride an electric scooter on the sidewalk. A bill tried to change that to make the law similar to bikes. But a lot of people do ride on the sidewalk because there aren’t safe places to ride. When in doubt, walk the bike or scooter.

How do I find the safest place to ride?

Google Maps and the trip-planning apps Transit and Citymapper have decent bike and scooter directions, but the bigger challenge across the LA region is the lack of infrastructure—there are major gaps in the bike route network and few protected lanes.

A handful of LA-area cities like Santa Monica, West Hollywood, and Long Beach have better infrastructure for biking and scooting.

Also, be vigilant about potholes and uneven pavement. Bike share bikes are fairly sturdy and can handle a bumpy, unpredictable road. Scooters have tiny wheels and low clearance and you’ll very likely bottom out. Do not ride the scooters downhill—you won’t be able to stop.

Can I take a dockless bike or scooter on the train?

No, you’re not supposed to. But along many lines, and especially on the Expo Line, most stations have a variety of micromobility options to choose from once you get off.

Can I ride at night?

Yes, you can ride bikes at night. All of the bike share bikes in LA have pedal-powered lights that activate as you ride. Some scooters do have lights but some are taken off the streets to charge them.

Why do I need a drivers’ license to ride a scooter?

Good question. This is perhaps the most incongruous state law to govern what should be a Smart alternative to driving, but, in the state of California you must have a valid driver’s license to operate an electric scooter. The apps will make you check a box or scan your license before you ride.

For bike share, riders must be 16 and over. Scooter share riders must be 18 and over.

What’s the difference between dockless and docked bike share?

Since late 2017, a half-dozen dockless companies have deployed their bikes and e-bikes on LA-area streets. While traditional “docked” bike-share systems require that bikes be parked in stations where riders can find them, “dockless” bikes use GPS technology and smartphone apps to help riders locate bikes. In the cities that allow them, they don’t have to be locked to anything, and there are no designated pick-up spots or drop-off points.

Some cities in LA have “Smart bikes,” which are also located by app on a smartphone, but they can’t just be left anywhere, they need to be locked. Riders can lock them to designated hubs for no extra cost, or to any public bike rack for a slightly higher fee. On the Westside, the city’s bike share operator, Metro Bike, uses Smart bikes that don’t need to be parked in hubs. The same Smart bikes will soon be launched in North Hollywood.

Micromobility companies operating in the LA area have also started offering electric bikes and electric scooters, which are dockless as well. These can also be found using apps, which display the location as well as the current battery life (the scooters and bikes get charged at night and put back on streets).

What’s the difference between a pedal bike and an electric bike?

LA’s hills, mild climate, and long distances make it a perfect candidate for electric bikes. These are bikes with electric motors that offer what’s known as “pedal assist,” meaning you get a boost while you pedal—up to 20 mph—but if you stop pedaling, the bike slows just like it would on a regular bike.

Jump, which is owned by Uber, can be found throughout Santa Monica where its e-bikes are part of a pilot program, as well as in the City of Los Angeles as of mid-November. The bright red bikes are technically electric Smart bikes since they can be locked to racks. Lime has a limited number of dockless electric bikes on LA streets that don’t have locks.

The Metro Electric Bike pilot program debuted yesterday. 10 pedal assisted, electric bikes are available to all bike share riders. Find the bikes with the green icon in the app and website and ride the bikes for no extra charge during the pilot period! https://t.co/0hfgKhpNPo piccom/XROcrl9INz

— Metro Bike (@BikeMetro) November 9, 2018

In November 2018, Metro Bike debuted electric bikes as part of its docked bike share system. For a limited time, the bikes are available to rent for the same price as pedal bikes, and can be checked out and returned to any hub. They can be located through Metro Bike app, but they’re also white, making them easy to spot. Metro Bike plans to have at least 300 e-bikes spread across the network.

What’s next for LA’s micromobility scene?

Watch for traditional station-based systems experimenting with options beyond pedal bikes. And many cities are looking at adding bikes that can serve a wide variety of users. In Detroit, MoGo bike share launched a fleet of adaptive bikes including recumbent bikes, tandems, and cargo bikes.

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