Bosch eBike batteries. 36v ebike battery

Bosch e Bike batteries

Bosch batteries are an efficient, long-life energy source. Thanks to their enormous mileage, long service life and intelligent battery management system, Bosch lithium-ion batteries are among the most modern on the market. Bosch eBike batteries combine low weight with ergonomic design and simple handling. The battery management system of the high-quality lithium-ion batteries detects potential sources of error and protects cells from overloading. There’s a suitable rechargeable battery for every requirement and every type of eBike; whether it’s the rack variant, frame battery or the integrated solution. The DualBattery is perfect for touring bikers, long-distance commuters or cargo bikers. The combination of two Bosch batteries delivers up to 1,250 Watt hours.

Four battery positions

Frame battery

Sporty dynamic: As a frame battery, the PowerPack sits close to the centre of gravity to ensure optimum weight distribution.

Frame battery

Sporty dynamic: As a frame battery, the PowerPack sits close to the centre of gravity to ensure optimum weight distribution.

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Rack battery

Comfortably convenient: On step-through models, the rack battery frees up space and allows the rider to safely mount and dismount.

Rack battery

Comfortably convenient: On step-through models, the rack battery frees up space and allows the rider to safely mount and dismount.

Integrated battery

Stylishly elegant: The PowerTube can be integrated perfectly in the frame, creating a clean eBike look.

Integrated battery

Stylishly elegant: The PowerTube can be integrated perfectly in the frame, creating a clean eBike look.

Double the power: Linking two Bosch batteries can deliver even greater range. Ideal for tour bikers, long-distance commuters and cargo bikers.

DualBattery

Double the power: Linking two Bosch batteries can deliver even greater range. Ideal for tour bikers, long-distance commuters and cargo bikers.

PowerPacks

The versatile power source: PowerPacks from Bosch come in a variety of types. Frame batteries are close to the bike’s centre of gravity. This has a positive effect on riding behaviour. The rack variant is ideal for step-through models (only available in Bosch eBike system 2), offering greater freedom when mounting or dismounting. Charging is very simple in both variants: For charging with a Bosch charger, the PowerPacks can be easily removed with just one hand movement or conveniently charged on the bike itself. The high-quality, long-lasting eBike batteries from Bosch have high energy density with a compact size and light weight.

Battery – variants for the Smart system

New PowerPack 545

Go that extra distance: The PowerPack 545 is your ideal companion for excursions and city trips. You’ll never be caught short – even on last-minute diversions or unplanned uphill climbs.

New PowerPack 545

Go that extra distance: The PowerPack 545 is your ideal companion for excursions and city trips. You’ll never be caught short – even on last-minute diversions or unplanned uphill climbs.

New PowerPack 725

power and stamina: The PowerPack 725 is the perfect choice for longer tours or more demanding rides. It is ideally suited to eCargo Bikes or speed pedelecs with higher energy requirements.

New PowerPack 725

power and stamina: The PowerPack 725 is the perfect choice for longer tours or more demanding rides. It is ideally suited to eCargo Bikes or speed pedelecs with higher energy requirements.

Battery – variants for Bosch eBike system 2

PowerPack 300

The ideal companion on short, high-speed tours: The PowerPack 300 rack and frame battery variants for Bosch eBike system 2 are suitable for everyday use and short distances.

PowerPack 300

The ideal companion on short, high-speed tours: The PowerPack 300 rack and frame battery variants for Bosch eBike system 2 are suitable for everyday use and short distances.

PowerPack 400

Go further: The power of the PowerPack 400 (as a frame or rack battery version) means you can spontaneously explore new routes, visit friends or run errands.

PowerPack 400

Go further: The power of the PowerPack 400 (as a frame or rack battery version) means you can spontaneously explore new routes, visit friends or run errands.

PowerPack 500

Perfect for long journeys: A PowerPack 500 is the same size as and only slightly heavier than a PowerPack 400 but extends the range for longer trips. Available as either frame or rack batteries.

PowerPack 500

Perfect for long journeys: A PowerPack 500 is the same size as and only slightly heavier than a PowerPack 400 but extends the range for longer trips. Available as either frame or rack batteries.

Filter options

  • PowerPack 300
  • PowerPack 400
  • PowerPack 500
  • PowerPack 545 Frame
  • PowerPack 725 Frame
  • System
  • Mounting type
  • Voltage
  • Capacity
  • Energy content
  • Weight, Frame battery/ Rack battery
  • Dimensions, Frame battery/ Rack battery
  • Compatible with DualBattery
  • Compact Charger
  • Standard Charger
  • Fast Charger
  • 4A Charger

Unfortunately the selected combination is not available.

PowerPack 300

PowerPack 400

PowerPack 500

PowerPack 545 Frame

PowerPack 725 Frame

approx. 2.5 kg/ approx. 2.6 kg

Dimensions, Frame battery/ Rack battery

50% charge: Approx. 2 hours 100% charge: Approx. 5 hours

PowerPack 300

PowerPack 400

PowerPack 500

PowerPack 545 Frame

PowerPack 725 Frame

approx. 2.5 kg/ approx. 2.6 kg

Dimensions, Frame battery/ Rack battery

50% charge: Approx. 2 hours 100% charge: Approx. 5 hours

PowerTubes

For the highest demands in terms of performance and aesthetics: Bosch PowerTubes have the power to drive any ride and, thanks to their compact size and minimalist design, can be integrated within the eBike to ideal effect. There are two versions which are installed directly by the manufacturer, depending on the eBike model; horizontal or vertical. The sophisticated technology ensures carefree riding enjoyment: A safety catch prevents the batteries from falling out, while still allowing them to be removed with ease. Bosch offers three integrable lithium-ion batteries variants in the Smart system and in the Bosch eBike system 2, which cover all areas of application with different energy contents.

Battery – variants for the Smart system

New PowerTube 500

Elegantly integrated within the frame and the smallest PowerTube in the battery portfolio for the Smart system: The PowerTube 500 is the perfect match for minimalist lightweight eBikes.

New PowerTube 500

Elegantly integrated within the frame and the smallest PowerTube in the battery portfolio for the Smart system: The PowerTube 500 is the perfect match for minimalist lightweight eBikes.

New PowerTube 625

With the PowerTube 625 you have found the perfect fit for your eMTB adventures and longer trekking tours.

New PowerTube 625

With the PowerTube 625 you have found the perfect fit for your eMTB adventures and longer trekking tours.

PowerTube 750

The strongest and most robust PowerTube is made for long and demanding trail adventures. With this battery on board no mountain is too steep and no path too long.

PowerTube 750

The strongest and most robust PowerTube is made for long and demanding trail adventures. With this battery on board no mountain is too steep and no path too long.

Battery – variants for Bosch eBike system 2

PowerTube 400

The PowerTube 400 for Bosch eBike system 2 brings your stylish lightweight city bike up to speed and ensures carefree riding fun.

PowerTube 400

The PowerTube 400 for Bosch eBike system 2 brings your stylish lightweight city bike up to speed and ensures carefree riding fun.

PowerTube 500

The PowerTube 500 makes it easy for trekking and eMountain bikes to tackle long distances and the battery integrated in the frame provides a clean eBike look.

PowerTube 500

The PowerTube 500 makes it easy for trekking and eMountain bikes to tackle long distances and the battery integrated in the frame provides a clean eBike look.

PowerTube 625

Ready for any adventure: The PowerTube 625 for Bosch eBike system 2 lets you take on long and mountainous tours and offers plenty of power for maximum range and elevation.

PowerTube 625

Ready for any adventure: The PowerTube 625 for Bosch eBike system 2 lets you take on long and mountainous tours and offers plenty of power for maximum range and elevation.

Filter options

  • System
  • Mounting type
  • Voltage
  • Capacity
  • Energy content
  • Weight
  • Dimensions, horizontal battery/ vertical battery
  • Compatible with DualBattery
  • Compact Charger
  • Standard Charger
  • Fast Charger
  • 4A Charger

Unfortunately the selected combination is not available.

PowerTube 400

PowerTube 500

PowerTube 500

PowerTube 625

PowerTube 625

PowerTube 750

Dimensions, horizontal battery/ vertical battery

50% charge: Approx. 2.5 hours 100% charge: Approx. 6.5 hours

PowerTube 400

PowerTube 500

PowerTube 500

PowerTube 625

PowerTube 625

PowerTube 750

Dimensions, horizontal battery/ vertical battery

50% charge: Approx. 2.5 hours 100% charge: Approx. 6.5 hours

DualBattery

No journey is too long: DualBattery is the perfect solution for tourers, long-distance commuters, cargo bikers and eMountain bikers. The combination of two Bosch batteries delivers up to 1,250 Wh and can be installed in almost any battery combination from the manufacturer. The system switches intelligently between the two batteries both during charging and discharging. This ensures that both batteries are charged and discharged evenly, significantly increasing their service life. Depending on what is planned, a single battery can also be used.

DualBattery is only available for Bosch eBike system 2.

PowerPack 300 and PowerTube 400 don’t work in any combination with DualBattery.

Awards and test wins

For more than 10 years, Bosch eBike Systems has been delivering innovative eBike drive systems that offer the best performance and quality. Numerous awards and test wins confirm this and allow us to pursue our daily work with pride.

Can I Use 48v Battery With 36V E-Bike Motor?

In the ebike industry, unlike more mature industries, there’s a distinct lack of standardization. This means that components from one e-bike might use different technology, voltages, and connectors than similar parts from another e-bike. Replacing, upgrading, or adding electronic parts to e-bikes can get complicated, and fast.

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If you’re building your own bike, you want to replace a battery, or you just have a spare lithium battery you’re thinking about using on your e-bike, you might be wondering how compatible these different parts are with each other. So can you use a 48v battery with your 36v motor?

You can use a 48-volt battery with a 36-volt e-bike motor as long as the controller is compatible with 48-volt (or higher) setups, and the electric motor is compatible with and does not overheat by the increased Wattage (volt x amps) output generated by the 48-volt battery.

Let’s go over all of the reasons why this might not work from an electronics perspective and talk about what you should look for before plugging in a battery that’s not designed for your bike.

Can I Use 48v Battery With 36v Motor?

Yes, you can use a 48-volt battery with your 36-volt e-bike motor, but it might not be a good idea. Your motor probably will work with a wide range of voltages and is unlikely to be the source of any problems you run into.

Increasing the voltage to the motor will increase the rate at which it spins, which can have interesting mechanical implications and will cause the motor to generate more heat, but it won’t break anything short-term. In fact, some people deliberately over-volt their motors in order to get their bikes to go faster.

Before throwing a high voltage battery on your e-bike, you’ll want to do a bit of research. First, if you can, try to figure out the exact specifications of your motor and see what voltage ranges it was designed for.

If you’ve got a motor that’s designed to be used at 36 volts, the 33% increase in voltage to 48 volts is probably fine. If you’ve got a motor that’s designed to be used at a lower voltage, however, it’s probably being stretched already when it’s pushed to 36 volts. In this case, going to 48 volts is much more likely to cause issues.

Alternately, if you’ve got a motor that’s being used under its rated voltage, going to 48 volts will be totally fine.

Second, and more importantly, you’ll want to examine the other components of your bike and make sure that they’re compatible with your 48v battery.

Your motor will generate more heat and spin faster when it’s exposed to more voltage, but your controller is much more sensitive to changes in how electricity flows through your bike. This means that the controller is the component you’ll want to examine first if you’re trying to put a 48v battery on your bike.

Can I Use A 48v Battery With a 36v Controller?

You might be able to use a 48v battery with your 36v e-bike controller, but you’ll need to do some research first. Most modern e-bike controllers are designed for a very big range of voltages, so a 36v controller is a bit of an oddity.

Look for the model number of your controller (often found on a sticker on the unit) and try to find out the full range of voltages it’s compatible with. If the range ends in 36v (24-36v, for example), you’ll definitely want to avoid using a 48v battery. If it’s 36-48v or higher, however, you should be fine to plug in your big battery.

If your controller isn’t listed as being compatible with 48v or higher setups, do NOT plug the battery in. Controllers tend to have sensitive components like capacitors that will break very quickly when exposed to a higher voltage than they’re designed for.

Plugging a 48v battery into your 36v controller and turning on your bike has a very high chance of blowing your capacitors and breaking your controller.

What Happens When I Use A 48v Battery With A 36v Motor?

The terms “volts” and “amps” describe the flow of electricity through a system. If we think of electricity as water running through pipes, voltage describes the pressure of the water in the pipe, while amperage describes the volume of water flowing through the pipe.

A big, wide pipe with slow flow would have high amps and low voltage, while a thin pipe with high pressure would have high voltage and lower amps.

Your motor needs both pressure and volume in order to function. The more electricity it gets, the more torque it can generate. This means that in order to get up hills or start from a stop you’ll want to increase the amps that your motor has access to, but not necessarily the voltage.

If you want it to spin fast, however, it needs a supply of high-pressure, fast-moving electricity in order to quickly power and de-power the magnets that make your motor work. This requires a lot of voltage.

Motors are sensitive to changes in both amps and volts, but they’re generally totally safe to operate as long as the two don’t combine dangerously.

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To continue with the water analogy, this means that your motor doesn’t care if you’ve got a thin pipe with high pressure or a thick pipe with low pressure. Your motor will simply produce lots of torque at low speeds with one setup and high speeds with less torque with the other setup.

If you give it a thick pipe with high pressure, however, you risk exposing your motor to more total electricity than it can safely handle, which could cause problems. In other words, you’re mostly worried about watts, or voltage times amps, not the distribution between the two. This is why many people who overvolt their motors will modify their setup to reduce amperage, keeping their motors safe.

As mentioned above, supplying your motor with more volts than it is designed for will cause it to generate more heat. This often means that you’ll reduce the lifespan of your motor, although not necessarily by a huge amount.

Motors are designed to handle some amount of heat generation and are usually over-engineered, meaning that they’ll have generous tolerances in terms of their ability to handle the voltage, dissipate heat, and deal with wear and tear.

In practice, you’ll probably be fine with a modest increase in volts of 25-35%, especially if you don’t run your motors at peak output all the time. Again, though, be mindful of your total watt output and make sure that you’re not pushing an unsafe amount of energy into your motors.

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E-Bike Batteries: Volts, Amps, Watt Hours Explained

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What Are These Volts, Amps, and Watt-Hours? How Battery Specifications and Capacity Equate to Capability and Cost

Understanding e-bike batteries can be challenging, even for those of us in the know; the nitty-gritty details are figured out by electrical engineers with years of education and experience under their collective belts – and for good reason, it’s all chemistry and math over there!

You’ll encounter a host of terms when reading about e-bikes or looking at electric bike battery specifications: things like battery size, capacity, voltage, amp hours and watt hours. Some of these words are more-or-less interchangeable, others are related but distinct. All of them can be confusing, but they are also hugely important in understanding electric bikes and their capabilities – most notably when trying to interpret how far they can take you before needing to be recharged.

In this guide to e-bike batteries, the helpful writers at Electric Bike Report will help you to understand the meaning of common battery terms and their relation to the performance of the electric bikes they power.

E-Bike Batteries Explained

Batteries are one of the core elements of electric bikes. They are needed to supply power to the motor, which in turn provides assistance to the rider, and reduces the amount of human effort needed to move the bike.

E-bike batteries come in various sizes, and can be mounted to the frame in different ways. Some are fully internal, and are sealed inside the bike’s frame. As such, they are not removable, except by using special methods and tools available to professional technicians. Others are removable for easier charging and replacement, whether mounted completely externally (outside the frame), partially recessed (sunken into the frame to some degree), or completely recessed (sunken entirely and nearly invisible on the bike).

Regardless of their type, all e-bike batteries are actually battery packs, and are made up of groups of cells, similar to the standard AA or AAA batteries used in everyday applications. The number of cells and the method used to cluster them together determines how quickly they can provide power and how long they can continue to supply it.

In contrast to standard AA or AAA batteries, however, those used in e-bikes are most commonly rechargeable lithium-ion batteries similar to those used inside smartphones and in conjunction with cordless power tools. Lithium-ion batteries are efficient and can be recharged hundreds or even thousands of times if cared for properly. The Light Electric Vehicle Association, or LEVA, has a great article that they allowed us to re-publish regarding proper battery care and safety to ensure maximum life span.

Fully integrated batteries such as the one on the Velotric Nomad 1 can match the bike’s color and disappear into the frame.

Electric Bike Battery Terms and Definitions

Before we dive deeper into the details, let’s consider a couple of examples of e-bike battery specifications in relation to how they usually appear:

V = Volts and Ah = Amp-hours

V = Volts and Wh = Watt-hours

Both examples convey two basic measurements, albeit a little differently. In both examples, we see volts first; this measurement relates to the availability of the electrical energy the battery can deliver. Next, either amp-hours or watt-hours are shown; these represent a battery’s capacity, or the amount of power it can store.

Let’s define these words (and a few helpful additional terms) a bit more clearly:

Current: the flow of electricity, or transfer of electrons, through a circuit.

Circuit: a closed system of wires and electrical components through which current can travel.

Volts (V): the amount of electrical force or pressure the battery can produce; the speed of the battery’s output of current. This is also sometimes referred to as the electromotive force, and is more specifically the speed at which electrons move through the system.

Note that this is a nominal rating that is used for classification purposes. In reality, a battery’s voltage varies based on the amount of power being drawn from it at a given moment, as well as the battery’s present level of charge. As current is drawn from the battery, its voltage decreases. This can be seen in an e-bike battery voltage chart.

Voltage is determined by the number of battery cells arranged “in series”.

Amps or amperes (A): a measurement of the strength of the battery’s output, or current. specifically, the volume of electrons passing through the system. This is limited by the size of the wires making up the system. Larger wires allow more current, smaller wires allow less. Generally, systems with higher voltage should use smaller wires (that limit amperage) to prevent overheating.

Amps can also be thought of as the amount of energy being drawn from the battery by what it is powering, and can fluctuate from moment to moment. In the case of e-bike batteries and their motors, a greater number of amps are drawn as the motor works harder (i.e. going uphill or using only the throttle).

Amp-hours (Ah): a measurement of charge; the amount of energy that can be delivered through an electrical system over the course of an hour.

In the case of a 10 Ah battery, it can deliver 10 amps of power in one hour, or 1 amp of power for 10 hours, etc, depending on the needs of the component that is delivering power to.

Amp-hours are determined by the number of clusters of battery cells arranged “in parallel”.

Watts (W): a unit of power, determined by volts and amps; the amount of work that can be done by one amp of current delivered at 1 volt. The amount of work is determined by the rate at which the energy is used.

This measurement is generally applied only to an e-bike’s motor, but its battery must support the motor’s needs.

Watt-hours (Wh): another measurement of capacity. In this case, the amount of work that can be done, or the amount of power that is spent, over the course of an hour. This is a direct result of a battery’s voltage multiplied by its amp-hours.

As such, a 24V, 20 Ah battery and a 48V, 10 Ah battery might look different on paper, but they have about the same amount of energy. This makes watt-hours a more reliable indicator of capacity when comparing different batteries.

Controller: A device that limits the flow of electricity through a circuit, and prevents a battery from discharging its energy all at once. In terms of an electric bike, this is the “brain” that adjusts the pedal assist system, the amount of input the motor contributes, and the e-bike’s speed.

Everything about e-bike batteries

The battery is one of the most important components of any e-bike, as well as the most expensive. The battery is the deciding factor in how long the bike can be used without recharging, how long it will work, how much it weighs etc. In general, when you choose an electric bike, the battery is the component that you must pay the most attention to.

What types of e-bike batteries are there and how do they differ?

Selecting a good battery directly determines its efficiency and the distance you can travel on a single charge. Even with the same size and weight, different batteries can work quite differently depending on the type and structure. All batteries have characteristics including capacity, voltage, size, weight, charging time and total battery life.

Voltage

most e-bike kits are rated for a specific voltage range. A typical 36V e-bike needs a battery that delivers power between 30V and 42V. A 36V pack at 42V is 100% charged and holds as much energy as it can; at 30V it should shut down and stop giving power before causing permanent damage. on the BMS (Battery Monitoring System) in a bit. The common number ’36V’ is the average operating voltage, sometimes called nominal voltage. Voltage is measured in volts (V) which is used to describe how fast electrons move. voltage = more speed!

Capacity

is the amount of energy that can be stored in the battery. It is the main characteristic of any battery. The unit of measurement is the ampere-hour (Ah). This value is a measure of the fixed number of amps a battery can sustain for 1 hour (C rate). Double the amps for half an hour. Or cut the amps in half for two hours, etc.

A battery has a certain number of discharge-charge cycles, after which the capacity starts to fall proportionately. If the battery is discharged by, say, 10% and recharged, it is considered that one cycle has been spent.

The actual battery life is determined by the number of cycles and it depends on the operating conditions of the battery. The longer the battery is discharged, the fewer possible cycles can be expected from it.

Lead (gel) batteries

This is the oldest variant, which is used less and less every year. There are many reasons for this, the main reason being low capacity. Gel batteries weigh a lot, and the battery makes the construction of the bike very heavy. In addition, it charges slowly: it takes 8-10 hours to charge fully. This battery also has a short life, only 150-200 cycles.

Li-ion battery (Li-ion)

The most popular and optimal type of battery for an e-bike today. A lithium battery has the best combination of total weight and capacity. The specific capacity of lithium-ion batteries is the highest of all existing types and this is their main advantage. Lithium-ion batteries do not have the ‘memory’ effect.

The disadvantages of this type include sensitivity to temperature conditions and an inability to charge quickly. The lithium-ion battery is also sensitive to overheating and requires control of the discharge mode. Ageing and loss of capacity occur over time. The number of cycles is about 400, which is two and a half times more than the lead-acid battery.

Lithium-ion batteries for electric bicycles must be specifically designed due to the presence of a battery management system (BMS) within the pack. This piece of circuitry must be set appropriately to control the amount of current draw required by the motor and to limit excessive discharge capacity.The BMS is also important for balancing cell charge between the individual cells within the battery to maintain battery life over time.

Li-Po

This type of battery is popular mainly among cell phone manufacturers because it’s incapable of operating an e-bike and does not withstand impacts and vibrations during the ride.

It is designed for use in electric cars where such vibrations are impossible. It is used very often in aircraft models where weight is important.

This is the most dangerous battery in terms of ignition! Under unfavourable circumstances (short circuits, failure of the BMS, accident) there is a high risk of ignition.

LiFePo4

This is a relatively new but already popular type of battery. The advantages of this battery include frost resistance (it works in temperatures as low as.30 degrees Celsius without loss of capacity) and its ability to charge quickly. This type of battery has the largest number of full cycles, which is about 1,000. It is less susceptible to ageing than the usual Li-ion. It is also devoid of the memory effect. The disadvantages of LiFePo4 batteries include low specific capacity and high cost.

Frequently Asked Questions

First, pay attention to the battery’s on/off system. Famous manufacturers use the ‘sleep mode’ in their batteries. You activate the battery mainly by pressing a button or turning on the e-bike on the control display. Once you turn off the e-bike, the battery will ‘sleep’ on its own after a few hours. so the power from the BMS system will turn off also. If you are riding on, you need to press the button again to activate the battery.

Storing the battery during the winter is very easy. Basically, it is enough to charge the battery 50% and store it in a cool place. It is better to store the battery outside the e-bike to prevent unwanted activation.

No, that’s okay, all types of batteries heat up during charging. So do the chargers.

The memory effect happens when a battery is recharged before being completely discharged. The battery ‘remembers’ the last remaining capacity before the next charge. Therefore, when you charge the batteries before they are fully discharged, the battery usage time will decrease. The batteries used by most of our products (Li-Ion, Li-Pol) have no or a very slight memory effect.

If the battery is not used after it has been fully charged, it will gradually lose energy. The self-discharge value for Li-ion and Li-Po batteries is very low and fluctuates by a maximum of about 5% per month at room temperature. It is useful to check the battery once a month, and if its capacity has fallen below 50%, charge it to about 70%.The suggestion that deep discharge prolongs battery life is total nonsense!

Greatebike.eu recommends a few tips for extending the life of your e-bike battery.

Tip 1 – Try not to discharge the battery below 20%.

Deep discharge makes the battery too difficult to use and reduces its capacity in future. A lithium battery starts to oxidise, which has a negative effect on capacity as well as battery life. In the case of switching off (e.g. in winter), it is recommended that the battery be fully charged at least once every 90 days.

Tip 2 – Do not charge the battery immediately after riding.

The battery should cool down before charging. If we start charging a heated battery, it will not be able to cool down at all, and degradation will be much faster.

Tip 3 – Do not fully charge the battery if it is not necessary.

When charging the battery above 80% of its capacity (around 40V), the internal resistance of the battery increases, the battery heats up more and this significantly accelerates the degradation process.

Tip 4 – Avoid extreme temperatures.

High temperatures and frost affect performance and shorten battery life. Never store the battery outside where it will be exposed to temperatures below 0ºC. Similarly, we recommend not storing the battery at temperatures above 30ºC. Furthermore, avoid long parking under direct sunlight.

We’ll help you to make your perfect choice!

Is there anything you want to know that you haven’t read here?

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Li-Ion Ebike Battery Charge Charts

Whats an 80% charge on a 48v battery? on a 36v? 52v? These charts give answers to questions like these on all common ebike battery voltages.

Remember, ALL numeric charts show ballpark values that may be numerically correct, but no generic chart can match your individual cell characteristics, your pack’s age or its chemistry. Bottom line: imperfect charts like this are still good baseline references. Use these and teach yourself how to read the voltage gauge on your display screen.

Quite some time ago, I produced a series of charge status charts for a variety of common lithium-ion battery voltages. They’ve become a fairly common link to help folks out on various groups who use these battery voltages in their ebikes.

I built them using Google Sheets, so they are not web pages, which I suppose has kept them from being widely linked in search engine results when people are looking at such things.

Here for the first time are direct links to the charts on a normal web page.

Volt (10S) Battery Charge Chart

The first link is to the lowest voltage: 36v. Generally this is the lowest voltage you will find on a modern, commercial ebike. Note that its called ’36 volt’ but really that is the ‘nominal’ value. A 36v battery is actually fully charged when it is at 42.0 volts.

Volt (13S) Battery Charge Chart

The next common size is 48v. These batteries are fully charged at 54.6 volts.

Volt (14S) Battery Charge Chart

The next battery voltage is 52v and very common. 52v batteries will work on systems designed for 48v, and why is easier to understand when you become aware that a ’48v’ battery really tops out at over 54 volts. A ’52v’ battery tops out at 58.8v, so it essentially lets you use a 48v system for a longer time at higher voltage levels that it is already designed to utilize.

Volt (16S) Battery Charge Chart

With a 100% charge voltage of 67.2 volts, when you have one of these you are getting into high voltage territory

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