Best Hybrid Electric Bikes: 7 Picks for All Budgets in 2023. Popular electric bikes

Top Ebike Brands of 2023: Our Favorites List

We started as a family of two, looking to ditch the second car, as we entered the world of ebikes. A few years later, now a family of four, we have quite a few trusty ebikes and still only a single car. Through our extensive time riding, my wife and I have our favorites when it comes to ebike brands. Each of our top ebike brands offers a quality ebike, good customer service, and a variety of models to select from to suit your needs. Browse our favorite brands below. This page will continue to be updated as we experience more brands of electric bikes.

Rad Power Bikes

Rad Power Bikes is the largest ebike brand in North America. Based out of Seattle, Washington, this company is growing extremely quickly and announced in February 2021 that they had raised a 150 million minority of investment to further its brand. If you want to learn more about the origins of Rad Power Bikes, I recommend NPR’s How I Built This podcast with Mike Radenbaugh, the company’s founder.

The upside and downside to this brand are that it is a direct consumer company. This means they cut out the middleman by selling directly to consumers instead of through bike dealers. However, if you are looking for that bike dealer experience, Rad has begun to open its own “Rad owned” stores in order to be able to provide service and test riding to its customers.

The RadWagon was my family’s first ebike. It is still our most consistently used ebike. Before our child, my wife and I rode on it together. We also use it for hauling groceries, rummage sale finds, and now a child. Since that first Rad ebike we have had the opportunity to try out their entire line-up of bikes. So if there is a model you are interested in, we have a review for it. We talk about this brand so often that we made the most frequently asked questions post for Rad Power Bikes. We also have created a Rad Owners Forum so we can hear from other Rad lovers.

Rad Power Bikes will forever be our first (ebike) love.

For related Rad Power Bikes ebike model reviews, see:

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Lectric eBikes

Lectric ebikes makes just one electric bike model offered in both high step and step-thru variations. The Lectric XP 2.0 comes in at just 999 offers a large-enough-for-most 9.6 Ah battery with a 800-watt peak motor. We like that the frame design makes this ebike accessible to a variety of riders regardless of height or biking ability. New for 2021 is the optional accessories including front and rear racks, a more comfortable seat (plus seatpost), folding bike lock, and premium headlight. Did we mention it folds? Suffice to say we believe the Lectric XP 2.0 packs a lot of value at 999 and is perfect for those who just want to cruise around without breaking the bank.

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Aventon

Aventon solidly fits in the value-priced ebike space. Their go head to head with some of the biggest names in electric bikes. On top of their great prices, there are Aventon dealers across the United States which means you can test a bike out for yourself before purchasing. Plus many of their models come in various frame sizes meaning you don’t have to compromise on the one-size-fits-all approach that many ebikebrands take.

For Aventon electric bike coverage check out the following:

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Ride1Up

If you are looking for a down-to-earth company with a heart for getting more people on bikes and less in cars, then look no further than Ride1Up. I was blown away by the generosity that the founder, Kevin Duggar showed by welcoming an interview with me (see it here). He spent a crazy amount of time talking with me about his ebikes even though I know he is an extremely busy brand owner. His passion for creating a quality and affordable ebike lineup was extremely evident during our conversation. This is a company whose leadership shines through in everything they make.

Ride1Up offers six models to choose from with a clear FOCUS on commuter style electric bikes. You won’t find any fat tire models on their website. One of their most unique models, the Roadster V2, doesn’t even look like an ebike. With its slim, lightweight design and built in battery, this ebike masquerades as a low-tech commuter bike in disguise. Ride1Up is sending us this model to test ride. We will add the video review link once we have one.

I love this brand for its passion for not just selling a product, but getting people excited about moving more and driving less. This company is incredible to work with and I have loved every bike I have test-ridden and owned. Ride1Up is a quality, direct consumer company like Rad Power Bikes which means less cost to the consumer.

For related Ride1Up articles and resources, see:

For related Ride1Up ebike model reviews, see:

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Ariel Rider

Founded by two brothers, Ariel Rider is a quiet achiever in electric bikes. Their sweet spot as of late has been moped style electric bikes which provide incredible performance for the price. If you’re in the market for a moped-style electric bike you’ll be able to find something that suits your specific needs. Here is the current lineup:

  • Rideal: traditional frame design at an incredible price (999)
  • C-Class: Fully-outfitted mid-drive ebike for the daily commute (1,799)
  • M-Class: Urban electric bike with a mid-drive motor (1,649)
  • X-Class: Moped-style electric bike that packs a punch (1,699) Also available in 52V variation (2,099.00)
  • D-Class: Dual motor moped-style electric bike that packs a bigger punch (2,399.00)
  • Grizzly: The ultimate moped-style electric bike: dual suspension, dual motor, dual battery (2,999.00)

For related Ariel Rider articles, see:

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Juiced Bikes

Juiced Bikes biggest differentiator is their batteries. It is rare to find a direct-to-consumer ebike company in 2022 offering 52-volt batteries. On top of the 52-volt batteries are the 19.2 Ah batteries offered as an option (or included) on some models. The nearly 1000 watt-hour capacity will surely cure your range anxiety.

As of late Juiced Bikes has been focusing on moped style electric bikes with the introduction of the Scorpion, HyperScorpion, and the new dual-battery HyperScrambler 2. They continue to offer a commuter model called the CrossCurrent and a fat tire electric bike called the RipCurrent.

For related Juiced Bikes articles, see:

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Biktrix

Originally launched as a Kickstarter campaign, this Canadian company has expanded its direct-to-consumer ebike company into a wide range of ebike models that ships worldwide.

The ultimate selling point for Biktrix: you can CUSTOMIZE your heart out. Customizable options include color, frame size, battery, wheels, forks, brakes and more. You can truly purchase the ebike of your dreams.

Biktrix has many models to select from in four series/categories:

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Blix Bikes

Blix Bikes was founded all the way back in 2014 in Santa Cruz California. That alone comes with some street cred, but the company backs that up with great ebikes. Previously Blix has offered city-oriented ebikes including folding and cargo ebike models. For 2022, they have expanded further into fat tire ebikes with the Ultra and a model designed for urban environments, the Dubbel.

We came away impressed with the quality during our Blix Packa Genie review and can’t wait to get our hands on their other models as well. Not only do we feel like they offer a great value proposition but their customer support is US based making them an easy brand for us to recommend.

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Electric Bike Company

There aren’t many ebike brands that can claim their ebikes are built in the United States. Electric Bike Company or EBC for short is one exception. Because of this, their ebikes have a certain quality about them, and it’s something you can’t fully appreciate until you see them in person.

Most of their models are cruisers or beach-style ebikes, meaning an upright riding position with swept-back handlebars. Paired with the seats, their ebikes are among the most comfortable to ride. Another unique thing, EBC ebikes are shipped via freight. While shipping isn’t free, their ebikes arrive at your home more fully assembled than most brands, and best of all – they arrive in pristine condition!

For related EBC articles, see:

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Super73

Super73 is a motorcycle-inspired ebike brand founded in 2016 in Southern California. They have a dedicated community, and they have carved out their niche in the moped-style electric bike space. They have, for the lack of a better comparison, evolved into the Apple of ebike brands. Part of this is their excellent marketing which has been buoyed by celebrity endorsements. I typically don’t get excited about buying a product because it’s “cool” but I have to give Super73 credit – their ebikes look incredible.

Planning to buy a Super73 electric bike? Using my link will get you 100 off your purchase.

Propella

7S and were hard pressed to find something we didn’t like about it. While the small motor and battery (250w motor and 7ah battery)are not going to fit everyone’s use case. The lightweight (37lbs total weight), and simple styling make this a great city or short distance commuter bike. Propella does offer the option to purchase a second battery, to help fight that range anxiety.

The upcoming 9S Pro is likely to fit the bill for more riders. The 9S pro comes equipped with a larger battery and a more powerful motor (350w motor and a 9.7ah battery). But sticks to the “elegant, lightweight and affordable” mission of Propella. (41lbs and 1699 MSRP) We are excited for the 9S Pro to release in August 2022. But cannot speak highly enough of the 7S and the other great offerings that Propella has. We cannot wait to see what this US based company has in store for the future.

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Top Ebike Brands Wrap Up

If you are shopping for an electric bike you can’t go wrong with any brands in our top ebike brands list. They all are reputable ebike brands with an established history in the electric bike space. It’s going to be exciting to see the new models coming out of these brands.

Комментарии и мнения владельцев

Hi. I live in Santa Fe, NM. What’s your recommendation for a good mountain/trail bike, some flat terrain, and some up the mountain trails. Thanks!

Depends on your price range. There are so many great E-MTBs on the market today! Depending on the trails something like the Vvolt Sirius might be an option: https://ebikeescape.com/vvolt-e-mobility-ebikes-launches-with-four-belt-drive-models/

I moved to mexico but cannot find a Mex E bike. Can you suggest a company or some company that ships to mexico

Thank you for all the great information you provide for the e-bikes. However I am running into a problem finding e-bikes for 300-380lb person. As I like to bike as much as anyone else. Are there any e-bike companies out there that accommodate this. It would be for all around use, Pavements concrete, mild dirt road etc… Thank you.

Hi Paw, Vvolt’s framesets have a weight limit of 440 lbs but they say to contact them regarding modifications: https://bit.ly/2VPMy8q The other company that comes to mind is Biktrix, weight limits depend on model but they have higher capacities than most: https://lddy.no/wzo3 Hope this helps!

I highly recommend Benno Bikes. The Boost is a fantastic bike. Very reliable. Strong. They are powered by Bosch. Practically Bullitt proof and fun to ride!!

Hi Ryan, I love your YouTube channel, great job! My husband and I will be purchasing e bikes (through your affiliate link, of course). We are looking to spend around 2000 per bike. He is 6’1 and I am 5’3 so I’m thinking Aventon might be our best option because of different frame size. I would like something with good range and comfort. I have found that my current hybrid trek bike gives me Wrist pain, also without any suspension it is a bumpy ride. We will be moving to Florida so I hope to find something that can go on paved trail as well as the sandy. crushed shell paths that can find in Florida Do you think aventon is our best choice? I also really like the Rad bike company. We do not require a folding bike, by the way. Thanks for your help!

Hi Ryan! Thank you for all of this information. I am 5’2”, 105#, 48 yo female in good physical shape and am stumped between the Aventon Level and the Ride1Up 700. I haven’t ridden the R1U but Комментарии и мнения владельцев from owners are making me lean that way. The one thing about the Level is that I don’t think I will get the exercise that I would like bc the PAS is so strong on #1. I like how the Pace 500 felt but the NexGen does not allow one to have a back fenderbasket. I really want both. I’m scared to get a bike that depends on ME to put it together. Plus, what if I don’t even like it? Can you help me decide??

Both great options! Call around to see if they will assemble your ebike. Perhaps you live near an Aventon dealer.

best, hybrid, electric, bikes, picks

Hello, I noticed you actually reply to every, thank you! My gf is 4″8 is there an e bike that would fit her?

Hello, What we really need to know is what her inseam measurement is? Really any step-thru design bike will fit her for stand over height. However figuring out the most comfortable pedaling bike, inseam measurement is going to be really important here. Will keep an eye out for your reply. Best, JT

Hi! I live in San Diego and although most of the terrain is flat, I’d like to use to commute to work (3mi with some up hill). Mostly going to be used as a cruiser…any recommendations? Is there a brand that you’d recommend over another?

Hard to narrow it down to just one. The market has so many great options right now. Some of out favorite brands have to be Rad Power Bikes, Aventon, or Ride1up. They all offer great cruiser style bikes, just comes down to some personal preferences at that point. Take a look into those brands, and let us know if you have any specific questions about any models.

I’m a long-time experienced rider who has been off the bike for a while. I don’t know much about ebikes but am learning fast. This article is great! Thank you! I’m 6’1″, 235 lbs., and looking at a ride home from work that includes a 5-mile, 1400-foot ascent. Any specific recommendations? Thanks!

I would honestly recommend a Mid-Drive ebike for you. Being that you have experience riding a bike, the Mid-drive option will feel more natural for you to ride. Ride1up Prodigy is a great option or maybe even a VVolt Sirus. We have video reviews on both if you are curious about them. Ebike Escape YouTube Channel Hope that helps.

Just watched your video on the Propella 7S v4. I’ve never watch a bike being built; very entertaining! I have the Propella. Wanted a light weight low priced good bike. And that is what I got. Tell me, if I want more power and a longer ride ….and insist on Light Weight, have you found anything comparable to the Propella? I did notice that Propella was not included on your list of favorites. Tell me more

Hello John. For the price, there is not anything else we have found. If you are willing to spend a bit more GT makes a bike called the eGrade and there are a couple of other “big box” brands that have similar offerings. But for the budget-minded, Propella takes the cake. Thank you for pointing out the “Top Ebike Brands” Page. They are actually listed on there, I just forgot to add them to the “Jump to” section at the top. Will fix that now. We are very excited to try out the 9Pro in the near future.

Hello, can i ask why lectric ebikes are so low on the list? Does it have to do with quality? Thank you

Their placement on this list has nothing to do with quality. The list is just written in the order of us “discovering” and adding the brands. It is not in descending order or anything of that nature.

My wife is 5’0 and watched your video on the Velotric Discover 1 Commuter Bike. Her inseam is around 26″. She prefers a ST frame. Is there a different Bike that you would recommend in a similar price range?

best, hybrid, electric, bikes, picks

The Aventon Pace 350 or Ride1up Core-5 are both options. Really for any ebike I think she will not be able to be stopped and sit on the seat. But she should still be able to pedal them all with little issue.

Hello! What a wealth of information you provide! Thanks! Here are my specifics; 70 years old, live on a dirt/gravel road with hills around me. Don’t have the storage space for a 4×4 plus years ago, when living in the city I had a Trek road bike that I loved! So.with all this being said and with all the brand’s available could you filter out what brands you would recommend? I know this might be a tall job given my needs so any help you can give would be appreciated!

There are quite a few brands that fit your needs. But I think I need a bit more information based upon some things you said. Are you looking for an ebike that can replace a 4×4? Do you need a step-through frame? Is the weight of the ebike an issue? What are you looking to do with it? Ride it to town to do errands?

70 year old 5’10”, 175#. Want to ride but have neck injury so need to reduce up and down jerky movements, need step thru, upright position. Ideally would like folding, but comfort most important. Any ideas for me? Whatever I buy I will do thru your links, your site is fantastic!

best, hybrid, electric, bikes, picks

I would hate to recommend something for you and have it irritate your neck injury. What I would really recommend for you would be to go to a riding center or find a dealer near you for ebikes. That way you could try out some ebikes before making any purchases.

Ryan, I’m interested in a folding eBike with a mid motor and carbon belt drive, and would love to see you do a review of the Evelo DASH. I want to compare it with the Electric Bike Company model F and get your opinion about the comparison between the two. Thanks

We will definitely add that to our “wish” list of ebikes to review. It looks like an awesome-ly spec’d ebike.

I’ve been watching a lot of your videos and I say you are doing a superb job of helping every type of rider!! I’m a 71 year old female who is on the look for my 1st ebike. I think I need 2! A small, lightweight for camping and a better one for around town. I’m leaning towards Lectric for camping and Rad for home. However, there’s a Pedego dealer very close to me. I’m very mechanical, but the idea of having support nearby is tugging at my heartstrings. I better visit Pedego. Don’t you agree? And of course, I’ll purchase through you, to repay you for all your help!

Completely agree. Having local service and availability of parts is hard to pass up. We wouldn’t fault you for following your heart on that one.

Hoping to get an opinion on my quest to find an e-bike that meets my needs. Here are my wants. Need bike with enough power to handle moderate/steep hills. Need to be able to carry a passenger, my 6yo son. I am around 250lbs and son is 44 lbs. Prefer fat tire type bike with step thru or lower top post. Needs to be configurable for class 3. Can’t spend more than 2500 or so. Here is where I’m at in the process. I first tried Radrunner plus. Good support for hauling kid on back but very unpowered. Had a tough time getting up fairly steep hilll had to pedal really hard. So retuned that. Then bought juiced bikes rip current s due to powerful motor. Bike was damaged on arrival and they took too long to replace so I moved on. Now I’m looking at Blix Utra. It seems to have the right mix. Nice hefty rear rack that can support 150lbs. 750 watt motor with peak output around 1300 watts. Any issues with Blix in general? I also like the aventon aventure but rear rack not as solid and they have throttle lag issue that I don’t like. I would rather have a 1000 watt motor but prob don’t really need it. Any others I should look at? Thanks in advance for any info.

We recently reviewed the Blix Packa and have nothing but good things to say about it. It might even replace Ryan’s current kid hauler, the Radwagon 4. I think the Blix Dubbel might actually fit what you are looking for a bit more. Currently in Pre-Order, but should be shipping in November: https://bit.ly/3ye1VaO (affiliate link)

Thanks for the feedback. Yeah, I like the form factor and versatility (off road, etc)of the Ultra. The Dubbel has a similar form factor to the Radrunner Plus, which I felt was too small for me, being 6’1″. One other question for you. My only remaining concern about the Ultra is use of the Shengyi motor over the more common Bafang, which appears to be the gold standard for e-bike motors. Any concerns there?

Not really. Hub motors have been around for a long time, and are really a proven component. Shengyi looks to have been making motors for close to 20 years (established in 2003). Blix also has a 1 year warranty on motors and frames (which is standard, but always nice to see).

Love your YouTube videos! I am interested in the Priority Current. Have you ridden one and do you have an opinion on this model. Do you have an alternative recommendation to the Current? Thanks and keep up the good work!

We have not ridden any Priority ebikes. They look like some nice spec’d models. We are big fans of mid-drive ebikes. Ride1Up has the Prodigy ST or XR and we are fans of the Vvolt ebikes. Both of those ebikes we have video reviews on.

To be honest I have 2 Focus bikes, a 29ner hardtail and a full suspension, know my bikes, work on them and do Centuries, I’m 74. Bought a Rad and Lectric bike and sold them, didn’t like mechanical brakes and too slow. Recenty bought a Magic Cycle Oscelot Pro and couldn’t be happier. Techtro hydrolic brakes, the best and up to 80 mile range with pedal assist. Have gone 75 miles with partial throttle. Army Green, in my opinion the welds are fantastic and components are great. Too bad they are not on your list, far superior to your #1 Rad bike. And they have only been in business for 2 years. Will purchase the Cruiser Pro upon the sale of one of my Focus bikes. Just my opinion. Also the best packaging upon receipt!

Which ebike are you talking about? If you are just getting something fixed up on the mechanical side of the bike, most local shops should be able to help.

I am so torn between Rad Rover plus 6 steps-through and Aventon Aventure 2 step-through. What’s your recommendation.

They are both great bikes. The Aventure offers a different look and a slightly more powerful motor. Is there something specific that is holding you back from one vs the other?

Thank you so much for your fast response! The weight of the bike, and the customer service. I am not sure which customer service is better. I would like to not have issues and can’t reach anybody. I wish it was a Walmart product. Do you think purchasing it online is the same as a dealer’s? I would like to purchase online. I don’t want to pay almost 2000 for a piece of metal that can’t be ridden.

Best Hybrid Electric Bikes: 7 Picks for All Budgets in 2023

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Today’s range of electric hybrid bikes really is something to behold. Cyclists looking to buy one of these e-bikes are spoilt for choice.

Perhaps that’s no surprise as, thanks to their versatile features, hybrid e-bikes can cover a wide range of bike rides. From zipping down the main roads and into the office to weekend rides equally fun, but at a slower pace.

This is our selection of the best hybrid electric bikes for all budgets.

Best Hybrid E-Bikes

Running a Bosch Performance Line Sport motor this e-bike offers pedal assistance up to a speedy 28mph.

An electric hybrid bike for city use. Comfortable riding position, clean single speed gearing and a low maintenance belt rather than a traditional chain.

Available in both a traditional style frame and a step through, this e-bike has a throttle and a 50 mile range.

Sold in a variety of specifications. Uses a mid-mount motor for a superior ride feel. Includes app integration and remote locking.

Has not two, not three but four lights onboard. The extra two are integrated into the frame for better visibility at night.

Suspension fork and wide tyres for riding different places. Includes the better performance mid-mount motor but still at a great price!

What is a Hybrid Electric Bike?

By adding pedal assistance or a throttle to a normal hybrid bike you get a hybrid electric bike. Their name can be somewhat confusing, especially when the word ‘hybrid’ has been seized upon by the motor industry to describe cars with two propulsion methods.

Like their non-electric counterparts, these bikes are extremely versatile, can be used in loads of different riding scenarios and ultimately, are perhaps the most popular type of electric bike around.

Electric hybrid bikes mirror standard hybrid bikes in the fact they can range from something that looks and performs like a mountain bike to something that could easily reassemble a road bike.

E-hybrids that sit towards the mountain bike end of the spectrum will have a suspension fork and wider tyres to help the bike cope when away from the tarmac. Those models which are closer to road bikes will have narrower tyres, a rigid fork and be more suited to riding longer distances at a faster lick.

We suggest looking at a couple of features when buying an electric hybrid bike. First, which type of motor the e-bike uses – those at the lower end of the market will use a hub motor, with more expensive bikes running a mid-mount motor. Mid-mount are known to deliver a more natural ride ‘feel’ and a longer range between charges. They won’t support a throttle though. Hub motors are great, but might not feel as balanced as a mid-mount motor.

Battery size or riding range is a second consideration when buying a hybrid e-bike. A small riding range might not be a dealbreaker, especially if you plan to commute short distances, but for frequent riders, it might quickly become a frustration.

A third consideration when buying a hybrid e-bike is the overall weight of the bike. With some weighing upwards of 60 lbs, manoeuvring them in tight stairwells or busy transport hubs can be tricky.

Who Are Hybrid E-Bikes For?

Electric hybrid bikes are a fantastic option for many types of cyclists. They are for those who want to enjoy the outdoors, pedal errands, attain new levels of fitness or cycle to work.

Let’s be clear, electric hybrid bikes aren’t for those of us who are older or with less mobility, they’re for everyone! Indeed, electric bike statistics have shown that riders of e-bikes expend almost the same amount of energy as those riding normal bikes.

Because many electric bikes, hybrids especially, come equipped with all the traditional extras (pannier rack, lights, fenders etc.) they are well suited to riding year-round and in all weather conditions. Obviously, this puts them in the realm of commuter cyclists who want to ride to work every day of the week.

Plus with cheap recharge costs and other associated running costs which are equally low, hybrid e-bikes are an extremely appealing mode of transport, especially when compared to cars.

Hybrid Electric Bikes Pros Cons

As we’ve already discovered, hybrid electric bikes really are the Swiss army knife of the bike world. Although some e-hybrids can be further subcategorised, these bikes will take pretty much every kind of bike ride in their stride.

  • Huge amounts of choice
  • Versatile, can adapt to different rides
  • Most are sold ready equipped
  • Various price points available

Ditch the Car (and Gas Hike) for These Top-Rated E-Bikes Instead

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With expensive gas, scarce parking, and traffic, there are plenty of good reasons to ditch your car for a bike. But bikes have their downsides too — whether as commuters or weekend cruisers — leaving us sweaty, tired, and possibly late to our destination. Thankfully, there’s now a middle-ground: the best electric bikes.

After tremendous advancements over the past couple years, the best electric bikes (a.k.a. “e-bikes”) are now better than ever. They can travel up to 40 miles on a single charge and hit speeds of 28 miles per hour (all without us breaking a sweat), and their price tags are now more reasonable as well.

In other words, the best electric bikes are now a viable alternative to driving — especially for daily commuters. With the physical exertion of a light walk, e-bike riders are able to zip by traffic, park almost anywhere, and save a fortune on gas. Plus, the best electric bikes provide a lovely weekend activity to boot.

If you’re thinking of investing in an e-bike, read on. We’ve rounded up some of the best electric bikes to buy online, as well as a few key considerations to help you make the right purchase.

In This Article

The Best Electric Bikes to Buy Right Now

Electric Bike Buying Guide

How We Chose the Best Electric Bikes

The Best Electric Bikes to Buy Right Now

Whether you’re commuting, cruising the park, or hitting the trails, electric bikes are now well worth considering. Below are some of the best electric bikes for all terrains and activities.

Best Overall: Ride1Up Prodigy

Best Moped-Style E-Bike: Super73-S2

Best Cruiser: Velotric Nomad 1

Best Budget Pick: Lectric XP 2.0

Best Road Bike: Vela High-Step

Best Mountain E-Bike: Go Power Go Speed

Editor’s picks

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Ride1Up Prodigy

Far too many modern electric bikes pack on power and features without considering power delivery, balance, and overall quality. Hence our love for the Ride1Up Prodigy. It’s one of the smoothest, most nimble, and most sturdy-feeling e-bikes we’ve tested, but still brings speed and features to rival any brand.

The riding position is somewhere in between a cruiser and a road bike, lending control for tight turns and enough comfort for longer rides. On straightaways, it’ll quickly blast to more than 25 miles per hour, and the 9-speed Shimano trigger shifter ensures easy peddling at any electric setting or speed.

But the real deciding factor for us was Prodigy’s power delivery. At any speed, electric power feels like a boost to your organic pedaling instead of a jerky surge (which we see a lot). This, plus the Prodigy’s do-anything hybrid build, makes it our favorite e-bike of 2023.

Super73-S2

You can tell just by looking at the Super73-S2 that it’s not like other e-bikes. With beefy tires, a rugged, aircraft-grade aluminum alloy frame, and a long seat, the S2 looks closer to a motorcycle than a bicycle. It feels more like a motorbike too, as you sit in a lower, more relaxed position. And once you’ve started up the bike, it moves with more power than others, easily hitting almost 30 miles per hour — even without the use of pedals. Lastly, 40 miles of range means you can enjoy the bike’s smooth, fun power for long rides or commutes.

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In our testing, the Super73-S2 stood out just by feeling noticeably more sturdy, rugged, and powerful (although on paper it doesn’t seem too different than others). In other words, the S2 not only brings high-end power, but also the build quality to match that brawn. The bike does command a higher price for this unique sturdiness, but we think it’s worth it.

Velotric Nomad 1

If you’re looking for a comfy cruiser that can tackle dirt and sand just as easily as concrete, check out this Nomad 1 from Velotric. With extra-beefy tires, soft (adjustable) suspension, and a rugged frame, the Nomad 1 delivers an experience that’s somewhat similar to the Super73 — only the Nomad 1 costs half the price. But the bike’s specs are much better than its price would suggest: You get up to 55 miles of range, hydraulic brakes, and a Shimano 8-speed. In our testing, the bike was also very quick: It’ll jump up to around 25 miles per hour effortlessly, and can even breach 30 with some intense pedaling.

Lectric XP 2.0

Although e-bikes can get pricey, you don’t need to empty the piggy bank to get a fun e-bike. Case in point is Lectric’s line of affordable, folding e-bikes, such as this XP 2.0. For less than 1,000, the XP brings an 850-watt motor joined to a reliable battery that can run for up to 45 miles. On the road, fat tires and adjustable front fork suspension provide plenty of comfort, whether you’re commuting or getting in a pleasure cruise.

But one of the best features of the Lectric XP is its folding design. This lets you break down the bike to fit in just about any trunk or medium-sized cabinet, making storage and transportation extremely easy. This is also great for safety purposes: Just fold up the bike and bring it into the office, restaurant, or store instead of locking it outside.

Vela High-Step

This Vela High-Step is more than its good looks (and it has plenty of those). Thanks to its light frame and central, vertically-mounted battery, the Vela is the most nimble e-bike we’ve tested, making it an excellent choice for weaving through busy city streets. This agility is complemented by an incredibly smooth power delivery system — a very welcome upgrade over the jolting torque we’ve seen on some e-bikes. In short, the Vela delivers a familiar yet effortless experience: you feel like you’re riding a non-electric bike — just faster.

The Vela’s range is solid too (40 miles), though top speed is somewhat limited, compared to competitors, at 20 miles-per-hour. But, when you’re zipping through urban areas, 20mph feels plenty fast, making the Vela our top choice for any city commuter.

Go Power Go Speed

Most mountain bikers have those rides when we just want to reach the top and enjoy a downhill run. This Go Speed from Go Power lets you do that better than any non-electric mountain bike. It features a 750-watt motor and a light aluminum frame for smooth climbs up steep trails. All in all, this can transform tough uphill slogs into breezy jaunts. When you’re ready to head back downhill, the bike is prepared with an 80-millimeter front suspension fork, 180-millimeter Tektro brakes, and knobby puncture-resistant tires.

Electric Bike Buying Guide

Shopping for electric bikes isn’t quite the same as finding a regular bicycle. Below are some specs we looked at while choosing the best electric bikes for you.

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Power: E-bike power is measured in watts, with motors ranging anywhere from 250 to 750 watts. Higher power is great (especially for heavier riders) and will provide more boost as you pedal.

If you already bike and just want minor help from a motor, a lower-wattage electric bike should be fine. Also, note that e-bikes cap their reported electric-powered speed at 28 miles per hour by law — any faster and they’d have to be classified as a moped or motorcycle. If you’re just riding a regular e-bike, you don’t need a special drivers license.

Battery: Longer battery life equals a longer range, which is always a plus. This is usually listed as a range because speed, rider weight, and terrain (i.e. uphill or downhill and street or trail) can affect a battery’s range. Typically, good e-bike batteries will get you 20 to 40 miles of range.

Style: Most customers purchase e-bikes for commuting — these kinds of bikes are described as hybrid or city models. But there are also some excellent sporty road bikes with motors, as well as electric mountain bikes. Those are bikes that take you from riding on the road to off-road adventures with ease.

Another term to keep in mind when it comes to style is “step-thru.” These kinds of bikes feature a top tube (the upper bar in the frame) that’s been lowered or removed completely for easy mounting and dismounting.

Brakes: Stopping power becomes more important with electric bikes. Look for high-quality brake systems, ideally using hydraulic technology instead of mechanical.

Size: Proper bike sizing is always key for power transfer and comfort. Be sure to check a bike’s size before buying (many bike listings will display the rider height range).

How We Chose the Best Electric Bikes

Although specs can give you an idea of an e-bikes prowess, getting time in the seat is the only way to find out if a bike is worth your money. We spent as long as a few weeks testing out certain e-bikes, and at least a couple of hours for others, looking for balanced handling, smooth power transfer, and overall ease of use with the bike’s electrical and mechanical systems. We also did our best to use the bikes in a variety of environments, including dense traffic, wide-open bike paths, and even dirt trails in a few instances.

Electric Bikes for Kids and Teens – A Buying Guide and Top Picks

Electric bikes for kids are quickly gaining in popularity, and the technology powering them continues to get better and better. From electric balance bikes for motocross kids to electric commuter bikes and e-mountain bikes, kids ebikes are an incredible tool for enabling kids to go faster and farther than their little legs can carry them on their own.

Whether you have a future bmx star, a young child tackling longer distances, a teenager commuting to work, or you’re a parent looking to replace short car trips, there’s an ebike for that! Ebikes for kids vary widely in purpose, so understanding what to look for as well as what is available is essential to finding the right bike for your child and your family.

In order to help you find the best electric bike for your needs, we’ve broken this article into four sections. The first section is a buying guide that covers everything you need to know about buying an ebike for your child, and the remaining three sections provide tips and specific bike suggestions based on the age of the rider.

While we highly recommend reading our full electric bikes for kids buying guide, here’s are some quick tips and specific bike recommendations for those TL;DR folks :-).

Quick Tips for Buying a Kids ebike

(1) Be aware of your local laws and regulations: Many areas prohibit kids from operating Class II (ebikes with throttles) as well as Class III ebikes (ebikes with a 28mph max w/wo a throttle).

(2) Look for a bike with a torque sensor: Torque sensors allow the rider to control the speed of the bike with the pedals. Without one, pedaling slower will NOT slow down the speed of the bike, which can be very confusing and dangerous for kids.

(3) Say no to the throttle: Throttles allow kids to reach high speeds quickly without pedaling and should be avoided. Throttles on essentially all ebikes, however, can be turned off or removed after purchase.

(4) Pay attention to weight: ebikes can weigh up to 60 lb. (or more!) and can be a lot for an adult, let alone a child, to handle.

(5) eBikes vs. electric balance bikes: Small electric balance bikes without pedals (such as STACYC) typically are not covered under ebike laws, but should still be used with caution.

The Best Electric Bikes for Kids

This list was compiled after extensive research as well as leaning heavily on our own experience with electric bikes. Unlike our other “best” lists throughout this site, we fully admit that we have not tested or personally seen all of these bikes.

details about these specific bikes are included in the age-based sections below. Like always, any additional feedback and suggestions are welcome in the Комментарии и мнения владельцев.

Electric Balance Bikes STACYC 12 eDrive STACYC 16eDrive GoTrax Kids STACYC 18e Drive STACYC 20E Drive Electric Bikes for Kids woom UP Commencal Meta Power 24 eBikes for Carrying Kids RadRunner Plus Aventon Abound Ferla Family Bike
3 to 5 9 mph 799
5 to 7 13 mph 1,049
5 to 8 15.5 mph 449
8 to 10 18 mph 1,999
10 to 12 20 mph 2,599
8 to 12 Best all around eMTB 3,799
8 to 12 Ultimate eMTB for advanced riders 3,800
Adult Comes with light, fenders, and rear seat 1,899
Adult Peppy longtail ebike, holds two kids 2,199
Adult Holds up to 4 kids! 3,999

Electric Bikes for Kids – Table of Contents

Jump Down Menu – Click to Jump to your Desired Section

  • Electric Bikes for Kids Buying Guide
  • eBikes for Kids (Bikes with pedals – age 6)
  • Electric Bikes for Toddlers and Preschoolers(Balance bikes – no pedals)
  • Electric Cargo Bikes for Carrying Kids(Cargo-esque bikes that allow for a child seat)

eBikes for Kids Buying Guide

If you are new to ebikes, there is certainly a lot to learn! In this guide, we will be focusing on the features of ebikes that are particularly important for kids. While the specifics of battery life, battery volts, motor torque, and countless other ebike components are very important to the overall performance of the bike, they don’t necessarily affect kids more than adults, so we won’t be discussing them here.

For a more general reference about electric bikes, REI’s How to Choose an Electric Bike is a great place to start. For a deep dive into the electric systems of ebikes, ebikes.ca is a top-notch resource, while Juiced Bikes does a great job going into the specifics of batteries. Lastly, for reviews on adult ebikes (including some small enough for tweens and teens), electricbikereview.com is a great resource.

Why an ebike for kids?

Two words – distance and elevation. Electric bikes allow kids to ride their bikes for longer distances as well as tackle greater elevations gains. Based on our experiences with our own kids, ebikes can magically transform rides that were previously too hard, too long, or too boring… into exciting adventures that kids truly enjoy.

Electric bikes are very different than electric scooters. Many people balk at the idea of a child riding an electric bike as they envision kids zipping down the street without taking a single pedal stroke. While this is certainly possible, it’s not probable nor is it the purpose or design of ebikes for kids.

When given the right bike (kids don’t need a throttle!) and in the right conditions (longer rides or in hilly areas), kids can still get plenty of exercise on an ebike.

Kid-specific ebikes don’t have a throttle (more about this below) and require kids to pedal for the motor to even kick on. If they stop pedaling, the motor also stops. While many tweens and teens can technically fit on adult ebikes with throttles (Class II or III), many areas have regulations to prevent kids from riding an ebike with a throttle.

Class of eBikes

Prior to shopping for an ebike, it is important to understand the differences between the three classes of ebikes on the market. Many states do not allow kids under the age of 16 to ride a Class III ebike, while many states don’t allow anyone (even adults!) to ride Class II ebikes on bike paths and trails. Check out Bikes for People’s Electric Bike Laws to learn more about your state’s regulations.

The two main differences between the classes of ebikes are:

What is a bike throttle? A throttle is a lever or button that activates the motor of the bike without having to pedal. If a bike does not have a throttle, the motor can only be activated by pedaling the bike.

Max mph assist Throttle
Class I 20 No
Class II 20 Yes
Class III 20/28 Optional

Class I

The motor on Class I ebikes cannot assist the rider above 20 mph max. While the rider can pedal to accelerate the bike faster than 20mph, the motor will stop providing additional assistance once 20mph is reached.

Class I ebikes also cannot have a throttle. The motor can only be activated via pedaling and the rider must continue pedaling in order for the motor to operate. Most ebikes sold in big-box stores are Class I ebikes.

All kid-specific ebikes are Class I, but for added safety, they typically have a lower speed at which the motor will stop assisting. For example, the kid-specific woom UP line maxes out at 12 mph and the Kent Torpedo at 17 mph.

Class II

Like Class I bikes, the motor on Class II can only assist up to 20 mph. The main difference is that Class II bikes have a throttle that allows the rider to turn on the motor and propel the bike forward without pedaling the bike. The rider can also choose not to use the throttle and to activate the motor via the pedals as well.

Class III

Stepping it up a notch, Class III ebikes can assist the rider up to 28 mph when pedaling, but only up to 20mph when using the optional throttle. Due to their higher speeds, Class III ebikes are the most regulated and in many areas are limited to street use only.

Ebike Sizing vs. Traditional Bike Sizing

Like regular kids bikes, ebikes for kids are sized according to wheel size. So if your child is riding a 24″ bike, they will likely fit on a 24″ kids electric bike.

Like all bikes, it is also important to take minimum and maximum seat heights into account as they can vary widely within a wheel size, depending on brand. If you aren’t sure what wheel size your child needs, be sure to check out our Kids Bikes Sizing Guide.

Currently, there are only a handful of child-specific ebikes on the market (in the US). The smallest bike we are aware of is the Kent Torpedo 20″, which has a minimum seat height of 27″ and can fit kids as young as 7. The Swagtron EB-6 20″ bike is a popular bike marketed as a kid’s bike, but it is too tall for most kids and with only 1 PAS mode, it is too fast for kids to ride safely.

Larger kids electric bikes are available from woom and Commencal, but they are designed for more aggressive trail riders, versus everyday neighborhood riders. With suspension and top-of-the-line components, these bikes are powerhouses on the trail but also come with a steep price tag that puts them out of reach for many families.

As a result, many older kids (tween and teens at least 5′ not riding on a mountain trail), will likely ride an ebike designed for an adult. Our page on Electric Bicycles for Women has many bikes small enough for a 4’11 – 5’0 kid rider.

The wheel sizes on adult electric bikes vary widely from 20″ fat tires to 700c street tires. As a result, the wheel size on adult ebikes cannot be used as an indication of the overall size of the bike.

Weight of eBikes

Ebikes are heavy! While the motor does help to compensate for the additional weight to get the bike moving, ebikes can still be significantly harder to maneuver than traditional bikes. This is especially true for tweens and teens riding adult ebikes, which can weigh up to 70 pounds.

Kid-specific ebikes tend to be a bit lighter than adult bikes, but they are in turn much more expensive. As a point of reference, the 3,750 woom 6 UP with 26″ wheels weighs 37.3 lb. while the 650 26″ Hyper MTN weighs 48 lb.

Like traditional bikes, lightweight ebikes tend to be very expensive. Don’t be surprised if entry-level ebikes don’t have their total weights listed. When researching for this article, reviews of specific bikes on YouTube and electricbikereview.com were helpful in providing information about the weight and overall size of the bike.

For adults carrying kids as passengers on an ebike, the total weight of the bike can be a lot to negotiate. Over the years, we’ve found Class II ebikes with throttles to be a gamechanger when riding with a heavy load.

Using the throttle to propel that heavy load forward from a standstill is significantly easier than attempting to do so by pedaling, even with pedal assist. Once the bike is moving, it is easy to maintain balance and momentum on the bike by pedaling and the throttle is no longer necessary.

Pedal Assist Modes (PAS)

A bike’s pedal-assist mode or PAS, determines how much “help” the motor provides while pedaling. Most ebikes have 3 to 5 pedal assist modes. The higher the pedal-assist mode, the more the motor will assist in propelling the bike forward.

The PAS modes are easily adjusted by pushing a button on the bike’s display on the handlebars, or on some bikes, the downtube. PAS modes can be changed at any time during a ride.

Pedal-assist modes work by altering the total output of the motor (watts). The higher the pedal-assist mode, the greater the percentage of output the motor will produce, and the less effort the rider has to exert on the pedals to propel the bike forward.

best, hybrid, electric, bikes, picks

As a point of clarification, be aware that these percentages are the MAX percentages the motor or the rider can have on the total output (basically speed) of the bike. The bike does not need to reach “100% output” in order to move.

The % of the output from the rider, as well as the motor, can vary within the set PAS range. For example, on a bike with 3 PAS modes, in PAS 2 the motor can apply up to 80% of the output, while the rider can apply up to 20%. As a result, the higher the PAS mode, the less effect the rider’s pedaling has on the speed of the bike. In all PAS modes, however, the motor will stop providing additional assistance once the bike reaches its max MPH allowed for motor assistance.

Riding with PAS

The rider must continue to pedal at all times in all PAS modes. If the rider stops pedaling (even in PAS 5), the motor will stop providing output. The bike, however, will not stop as it will continue to coast like a traditional bike. (Note: If you are engaging the throttle on a Class II or Class III ebike, the throttle overrides the PAS and you don’t need to pedal.)

To stop the bike, the rider can stop pedaling and coast to a stop or simply apply the brakes, which automatically turns off the motor.

The “feel” of riding with PAS can vary greatly from bike to bike. Compared to higher-end ebikes, lower-end ebikes tend to be jerkier and can also limit the rider’s ability to control the speed of the bike with the pedals. These differences are the result of the bike’s ability (or inability) to regulate the rate at which the motor output is applied.

Some ebikes will automatically apply the max motor output for every PAS (for example, ramping quickly up to 80% output at the first pedal stroke), while others will slowly ramp up the output based on the pedaling of the rider (slowly increase from 0% to 80% based how hard or fast the rider is pedaling).

A bike’s ability to quickly or slowly apply power to the bike is determined by the bike’s PAS sensor. There are two main types of sensors – a cadence sensor, and a torque sensor.

Cadence Sensors vs. Torque Sensors

While the PAS modes control the max % of output the motor will produce, the sensors on the bike determine the rate at which that max % of output is applied. There are two main types of sensors – cadence sensors, and torque sensors. While seemingly minor, these sensors can make a huge difference in how the bike reacts to the rider.

A cadence sensor detects if you are pedaling (not how fast, but whether the pedals are moving or not) while a torque sensor measures how hard you are pedaling (~how much tension is on the chain). Lower-end bikes typically have cadence sensors, but higher-end bikes have torque sensors.

While riding both bikes is the best way to “feel” the difference between the two, we’ll do our best to explain the difference and why we highly recommend bikes with torque sensors for kids.

Cadence Sensors

Cadence sensors act as on and off switches for the motor. Upon sensing a forward movement on the crank arms and pedals, the cadence sensor turns the motor on. Once the motor is on, it then applies output according to the PAS mode selected. The higher the PAS mode, the more output is available from the motor.

The cadence sensor, however, does not have the ability to determine how fast or how hard you are pedaling, it just looks to see IF you are pedaling in a forward motion. On a bike with a cadence sensor, you can be pedaling in a very low gear with NO tension on the chain at all and the bike will still be propelled forward by the motor.

As a result, the benefit of cadence sensors is that very little effort from the rider is needed for the bike to function, especially at high PAS levels. But on the flip side, since the sensor cannot monitor how fast or slow the rider is pedaling, it can be very challenging, or in some cases not possible at all, for the rider to control the speed of the bike with the pedals.

Regardless of how fast or how slow the rider is pedaling on an ebike with a cadence sensor, the motor will apply the max % of input based on the selected PAS mode. For example, if your bike has 5 PAS modes and you are riding in PAS 3 (60% motor input, 40% human) the bike will automatically ramp up to 60% of its motor output once the pedals start rotating. Slowing down or speeding up your pedal strokes will not affect the amount of output the motor is providing to the bike.

You can increase the speed of the bike by pedaling hard and adding to the 60% output the motor is already providing (the 40% rider output), but you cannot decrease the output of the motor by pedaling slowly. If you are already pedaling at a slower pace (so as to not add to the motor’s output) the only way to slow the speed of the bike is to decrease the PAS mode, brake (which stops the motor), or stop pedaling (which also stops the motor).

It can therefore be very difficult to ride at a slow speed on a bike with a cadence sensor, especially at high PAS levels. Whether you are spinning in granny gear or huffing and puffing in high gear, the output of the motor will remain the same.

For young riders, the lack of ability to control the speed of the bike with their feet can be VERY confusing and potentially dangerous. As a result, we highly recommend ebikes for kids with torque sensors (explained below).

Torque Sensors

While cadence sensors act as an “ignition” switch to the motor (turning it on or off), bikes with torque sensors take it one step further and essentially turn the pedals into a “gas pedal”.

By monitoring the amount of pressure applied to the cranks and pedals, a torque sensor allows you to slowly ramp up the output of the motor by pedaling faster and decrease the output by pedaling slower in all PAS modes.

So instead of quickly ramping up to the max % output in the selected PAS mode (like on ebikes with a cadence sensor), an ebike with a torque sensor will slowly increase the output of the motor according to how much tension the rider applies to the pedals (until it hits the max PAS %).

For example, if the selected PAS has a max output of 80%, the bike will feather the motor’s output from 0% to 80% depending on the force applied to the pedals by the rider. At a slow pedal rate, the motor may only output 20%, but as the rider pedals faster, the rate will increase until it maxes out at 80%.

So while bikes with torque sensors require more effort from the rider (the rider can’t just coast – they must apply pressure to the pedals), setting the bike to a higher PAS mode still allows the rider to get plenty of assistance from the motor by pedaling harder (like you would on a traditional bike).

As a result, like a traditional bike, an ebike with a torque sensor allows the rider to always be in control of the speed of the bike via the pedals. Want to go faster? Pedal faster. Want to slow down? Pedal slower.

The downside of torque sensors is that they are much more expensive to incorporate on a bike. As a result, ebikes with torque sensors are rarely found under 1,500 and are usually closer to 2,000.

Single-speed or Geared

PAS modes on a bike do not replace the gears. Like traditional bikes, gears on a bike allow you to alter how hard the bike is to pedal. The PAS modes on the bike adjust how much additional input the motor adds to your effort.

Gears are especially important when tackling steep elevation changes or technical terrain. If a bike does not have a “granny gear” to allow you to easily start pedaling the bike, the motor can’t kick in, regardless of the PAS mode you are in. As a result, if you stop on a steep incline you may not be able to get the heavy bike started up again. (Unless you have a throttle.)

On technical terrain, this is especially important as the PAS modes can’t help you power through a particularly rough part of a trail if the bike is in too hard of a gear to pedal. On an electric bike with a torque sensor (which most e-mountain bikes do), in order to get full input from the motor in your set PAS mode, you also need to be able to pedal at a decent speed.

If technical terrain or strong elevation gains are not in your plans, then a single-speed ebike with several PAS modes should suit you just fine. Bikes with throttles also typically don’t necessarily need multiple gears as you can always rely on the throttle to power you up a hill.

Keep in mind, however, that regardless of the class of ebike, the throttle can never accelerate the bike past 20 mph. Speeds beyond 20 mph require input from the rider via the drivetrain (you gotta pedal hard!), so gears are also essential for riders aiming for higher speeds.

Motor Placement – Hub vs. Mid-drive motor

The motor on ebikes can be located in three different places, (1) within the hub of the front wheel, (2) the rear wheel, or (3) at the bike’s bottom bracket (called mid-drive motors). Rear hub motors are the most common on low to mid-range ebikes, while mid-drive motors are standard on most high-end bikes. Front hub motors are not common.

Mid-drive Motor vs. Rear Hub Motor

For basic riding on paved surfaces, rear-hub motors do just fine. Bikes with hub motors are typically much cheaper than bikes with mid-drive motors, but they can throw off the weight distribution of the bike. As a result, for more technical riding, mid-drive motors are always recommended. In addition to being centrally located on the bike, they are also placed lower, thereby helping to lower the overall center of gravity of the bike.

Another benefit of mid-drive motors is that it is much easier to repair or replace the rear tire of the bike. With a rear hub motor, removing a rear wheel is certainly possible, it just takes a lot more time and effort.

The Best Electric Bikes for Kids (with Pedals)

From 8-year-olds taking on longer distances with their parents to teens needing a budget ebike to commute to work, we’ve done hours of research to find the best electric bikes for kids. While we have not personally seen all of these bikes, we have tested four different ebikes with seven different kids on a variety of trails.

The best ride for your child really comes down to your budget and how you plan on using it. Per our explanation provided in our buying guide above, we have not included any Class III ebikes. While we do not recommend bikes with throttles for kids, we have included several Class II on this list knowing that the throttles on essentially all ebikes can be removed.

We have also not included high-end kids eMTB bikes (with the exception of the woom UP which can be used as an eMTB and a commuter). From geometry to tires, suspension and brakes, there are a lot more variables to consider when shopping for an eMTB, but the basics outlined here still certainly apply.

If you are unaware of the importance of a torque sensor, please read our section about the differences in ebikes sensors above. Essentially, without a torque sensor, the speed of the bike cannot be controlled by the pedals.

Electric Bikes for Kids Comparison

Bikes for Ages 7 to 12. Class I. No throttle. 12 to 17 mph max woom UP 5 woom UP 6 Bikes for Ages 12, Class I. No throttle. 20 mph max Hyper eRide City Townie Go! 7D Priority Current Bikes for Ages 14, Class II w/ Throttle. 20 mph max Aventon Soltera Electra Townie Go! 7D Step-Thru If the throttle is removed, these bikes are suitable for kids 12
3,799 28. 33.5 35.6 Yes 3 11 250W
3,999 30.9. 37.4 37.3 Yes 3 11 250W
648 53 No 3 6 250W
1,899 4’11 – 5’11 44 Yes 3 7 250W
3,299 30.5. 36.5 Yes 5 5 500W
1,199 4’11. 6’1 43 Yes 5 7 350W
1,599 4’11. 5’11 48 No 3 7 250W

The Best Electric Balance Bikes

While electric balance bikes should never be a replacement for a traditional balance bike, they are great fun for tiny riders, especially future motocross or riders or BMX racers. From doing laps at the track to simply riding around the campground or backyard, these electric balance bikes can help instill a passion for riding at a very young age.

STACYC electric balance bikes (owned by Harley Davidson) are by far the best quality and most popular. While other cheaper brands have hit the market, most are significantly heavier than the STACYC line and don’t offer as many speed settings.

Compared to the similarly-sized Yamaha PW50 kids motorcycle, electric balance bikes are quieter, lighter, and significantly cheaper! Like the PW50’s governor, most electric balance bikes have several speed settings to limit the top speed for new riders.

MSRP Seat Height Speeds Wt. Range
Bikes for ages 2 – 5
STACYC 12eDrive 735 14″ – 16″ (3) 5, 7, 9mph 17 lb. 30 – 60 min
Bikes for ages 5 – 7
GoTrax Kids 399 19.3″ – 20.9″ (1) 15.5 mph 27 lb. 15.5 miles
STACYC Brushless 16eDrive 1,049 17″ – 19″ (3) 5, 7.5, 13 mph 19 lb. 30 – 60 min

STACYC bikes are also available under several other brand names, including Harley Davidson (who purchased STACYC in 2019), KTM, GASGAS, and Husqvarna. As far as we are aware, besides aesthetics, the bikes themselves remain the same across all lines.

Electric Cargo Bikes for Hauling Kids

From quick drop-offs at a friend’s house to skipping the pick-up lane after school, electric cargo bikes are a fun and fast way to get around the neighborhood! With the flexibility to hold everything from toddlers in child bike seats to a full-grown adult, your family is sure to get many years of use from an electric family bike.

There are many different types of electric cargo bikes (or trikes!) to consider. In addition to the information covered in our buying guide above, there are a lot of variables to consider. For an in-depth dive into the specifics of cargo bikes for families, we highly recommend checking out Bike Shop Girl’s Cargo Bike buying guide.

When it comes to your budget, higher-end bikes are typically lighter, offer better speed control via a torque sensor, as well as increased durability from the drivetrain and electronics. If your planned trips are within a few miles around your neighborhood, however, don’t be afraid to go for a lower-end cargo bike, such as the RadRunner Plus shown above. Although heavy and not as fine-tuned as other bikes, it works great for quick trips and after 100s of miles, we have no complaints!

MSRPWeightTorque SensorRange
Bikes for 1 Child
RadRunner Plus 1,899 74.3 No 45 Mi.
Aventon Abound 2,199 81 Yes up to 50 Mi.
Bikes for 2 Kids
RadWagon 4 1,899 76.7 No 45 Mi.
Aventon Abound 2,199 81 Yes up to 50 Mi.
Xtracycle Swoop 4,999 62.9 Yes up to 60 Mi.
Tricycles for 2 Kids
Ferla Family Bike 3,999 130 No 25 Mi.
Bunch Coupe 6,999 132 No 75 Mi.

All bikes listed, except the Bunch Coupe, have a throttle

Natalie Martins

Natalie has basically been obsessed with kids’ bikes since 2010 when her oldest of three kids began riding a balance bike. After trying to convince everyone she knew about how amazing balance bikes are, she began Two Wheeling Tots. As a certified secondary science teacher, she loves digging deep into the why and how of kids biking. With her in-depth knowledge of the kids’ bike world, she has consulted with many top brands as well as contributed to articles at NY Strategist, the Today Show, and more.

The incredible, Earth-saving electric bike is having a moment

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The clean-transportation revolution won’t arrive by way of futuristic hyperloops, driverless taxi pods, or drones the size of minivans — not anytime soon, at least.

And while electric cars get all the hype, a game-changing solution to getting around without warming the planet has flourished right under our noses.

Electric bicycles of all shapes and sizes have whirred and zipped their way into the mainstream in recent years as the pandemic has supercharged an e-biking boom that was already well underway. And that’s a great thing, because while replacing gas-burning cars with electric ones is key to heading off global warming, research has found Americans also need to drive less altogether to avoid climate catastrophe.

The Earth-saving potential of e-bikes

Transportation is the single biggest contributor to US greenhouse-gas emissions. And light-duty vehicles (cars, pickup trucks, and SUVs, not semis and airplanes) make up the largest chunk of that. Gains in vehicle efficiency are being dragged down by rising sales of large SUVs and trucks, while practically no progress has been made in reducing the number of miles people drive, Carter Rubin, a transportation lead at the Natural Resources Defense Council, told Insider.

All that makes enticing people to step out of the driver’s seat and onto a bike, bus, or sidewalk increasingly important for meeting climate goals.

Cleaner cars are an important solution, but we can’t just FOCUS on cars, Katherine García, the director of the Clean Transportation for All Campaign at the Sierra Club, told Insider. We need to make sure we are putting programs in place that really encourage people to take alternatives.

E-bikes have loads of potential to pry Americans away from their beloved automobiles, advocates told Insider, especially since short trips could easily be made on two wheels instead. According to the US Bureau of Transportation Statistics, more than half of all trips in the US are under 3 miles.

A University of Oxford study found that swapping a car for a bike just once a day slashed an individual’s transportation emissions by a whopping 67%. Another study found choosing an e-bike for 15% of one’s miles traveled cut their transportation emissions by 12%.

Fast, fun, and convenient, e-bikes are already helping people make that kind of shift in their daily lives.

Victor Silva, a product manager in the suburbs of Washington, DC, bought a RadRunner Plus from Rad Power Bikes for 1,900 in the summer after realizing most of his car trips were only a few miles. Now he’s hooked. He recently bought another e-bike and is looking to sell his and his wife’s second car since it barely gets any use. He said he wasn’t going to miss the insurance payments or traffic jams.

I’m trading an activity that I absolutely hate doing, which is getting stuck in traffic, with something that I actually like doing, which is getting some exercise and riding my bike, he told Insider.

After Wesley Cook and his wife sold their second car last year, they test-rode a pair of e-bikes from a local, Atlanta-based company called Edison Bicycles and never looked back. While they had never biked much before, they’ve slowly replaced daily errands like getting groceries or taking their son to school with e-bike rides.

Cook, a software engineer, just made an addition to the couple’s fleet — a cargo bike from Urban Arrow that has plenty of room for their son and their baby who’s arriving later this year.

The e-bike advantage

The power of e-bikes to alter peoples’ habits and help save the planet is simple and maybe a little obvious. But it’s important and worth spelling out nonetheless: By making biking easier, e-bikes encourage people to ride more.

A little electrical assistance goes a long way toward helping people overcome the obstacles keeping them from biking, whether that’s steep hills, a lengthy commute, physical limitations, or the mortifying thought of showing up somewhere with pit stains, John MacArthur, a professor at Portland State University who researches sustainable transportation, told Insider.

A lot of those barriers can be broken down by putting a motor on a bike, he said.

National surveys he’s conducted have indicated that e-bikes motivate people to ride farther and more often — plus they broaden interest in cycling beyond the stereotypical spandex-clad white man.

Lyft, which operates bike-sharing systems across the US, has noticed similar trends. It’s seen ridership boom by more than 50% since 2020 and attributes much of that growth to e-bikes. In 2021, e-bikes made up just 20% of Lyft’s New York City fleet but 40% of total rides and nearly two-thirds of journeys between boroughs, which typically involve a steep climb over a bridge.

As many people who have ridden an e-bike will tell you, they’re just plain fun — and they can often get you places faster and with less hassle than a car or bus. They’re that rare thing in life that’s both good and good for you.

They’re kind of a rocket fuel for regular biking, Rubin, a daily e-biker, told Insider.

Electric cars are important, too, but they’re expensive and far off for a lot of drivers, MacArthur said. Just consider someone who recently bought a gas car and doesn’t plan on trading it in for a decade. E-bikes, on the other hand, are an option that’s right here, right now.

The most popular electric vehicles in the US don’t have a Tesla logo

While electric cars get all the attention, e-bikes have for years been the best-selling electric vehicles in the US.

Last year, Americans bought just over 800,000 electric cars, according to Kelley Blue Book, a record. E-bike imports (a good proxy for sales since most e-bikes aren’t made in the US) numbered around 1.1 million, surging from 880,000 in 2021 and 437,000 the year before, according to an e-bike-industry trade group.

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In dollar terms, e-bike retail sales nearly quadrupled in the past four years, rising from 240.1 million in 2019 to 885.5 million in 2022, the market-research firm Circana estimates. While sales of leg-powered bicycles slumped 16% last year, e-bike sales jumped by 100 million.

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Ed Benjamin, the Light Electric Vehicle Association’s chair, chalks up the trend to growing awareness among consumers and more interest and know-how among bike sellers. The pandemic, which made people wary of close-quarters public transit, boosted e-bike fandom to new heights, he said. And sales show no sign of slowing down. In China and some parts of Europe, one out of every two bikes sold has a motor, Benjamin said, which indicates there’s plenty of room for growth in the US.

Improving tech and new form factors for different types of shoppers have fueled public appetite, too, MacArthur of Portland State said. Now buyers can choose from a wide variety of regular-looking bikes, folding bikes, tricycles, fat-tire mopeds, and even cargo bikes, which have extra room for groceries and seats for children.

The demand explosion has meant boom times for e-bike makers who played their cards right, like California’s Aventon, which got its start in 2013 selling (nonelectric) fixed-gear bikes.

Seeing the potential in e-bikes, the young firm went all in on the technology in 2020, at what turned out to be a very opportune time. Since then, it’s expanded its lineup to seven models and multiplied its revenues by a factor of 42, Aventon’s chief marketing officer, Adele Nasr, told Insider. One key driver of the success, Nasr said: Customers are increasingly seeing e-bikes as legitimate tools for replacing car trips, rather than just toys for recreation.

They’re starting to think about them differently, starting to imagine use cases that are so much more evolved than they were even three years ago, which is incredible, Nasr said.

Congress could give the e-bike boom another jolt

While the federal government has committed billions of dollars to public EV charging and 7,500 tax refunds to buyers of Teslas and electric Ford F-150s, it’s largely left e-bikes out in the cold.

That’s a big mistake, said Noa Banayan, the director of federal affairs at PeopleForBikes, an advocacy group that represents the bike industry. Since e-bikes are much cheaper than electric cars, you can get them into the hands of consumers faster, she said.

But times are changing. In March, a group of congresspeople reintroduced the Electric Bicycle Incentive Kickstart for the Environment (E-BIKE) Act, which proposes a 30% discount (up to 1,500) for the purchase of a new e-bike. The law could not only make e-bikes more accessible to more Americans, Rubin of the Natural Resources Defense Council said, but also send a powerful message to state and local governments to get serious about safer cycling infrastructure such as protected bike lanes.

Unlike when it was first introduced (then scrapped) in 2021, the bill now has support from major environmental groups, including the Sierra Club and Environment America.

Now they’re realizing that electric bicycles and active transportation, and micromobility more broadly, should be a part of their larger transportation and climate agendas, Banayan said. That’s really exciting.

This article is part of The Great Transition, a series covering the big changes across industries that are leading to a more sustainable future. For more climate-action news, visit Insider’s One Planet hub.

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