Best electric mopeds 2022. Electric motorcycle 50cc

We run down the best electric mopeds you can buy, ranging from some mainstream models to some not-so-well-known names

Electric mopeds are set to play a big part in the future of urban transport. Restrictions on private cars in city centres are already gathering pace: in the UK, Oxford and Bristol have joined London in charging petrol and diesel cars to enter. That means we’ll have to find alternatives, and e-mopeds will be part of the mix, along with bicycles (both pedal-powered and electrically assisted), kick scooters, ride-sharing and public transport.

So what’s available? Not so long ago, there were just a few feeble electric mopeds aimed at the likes of Uber Eats riders – plus BMW’s C-Evolution. But these days, there’s a new generation of smarter e-bikes capable of zipping silently up to 50 or 60mph, and packing bigger batteries for a much better range. Highlights include the Bluetooth-enabled Niu and the bargain-basement Lexmoto Yadea. Big names are getting in on the act, too, with Vespa and Honda both launching electric scooters.

When buying, look for a battery warranty of two to three years and qualification for the government plug-in vehicle grant. The top trend at the moment is for smaller twin batteries rather than one big one, enabling them to be lifted out for recharging – important if you live on the seventh floor of an apartment block!

Silence – from £2,695

Silence (pictured top) has been making electric mopeds since 2013 and the brand is now back on sale in the UK, with a range of four bikes from the 50cc-equivalent S01 to the 125cc-equivalent S02, offering up to 62mph from a 9kW motor, 5.6kWh battery and claimed 80-mile range. It reckons the S02 will sprint from 0-30mph in 3.9 seconds, while the top Long Range variant claims 91 miles on a charge.

The Silences are aimed at delivery services as well as commuters, and all can carry a rider and passenger, with quick release lift-out batteries for recharging from any 240V supply. There’s also an on-board SIM to communicate with a phone app, while all models feature regenerative braking, to put a little energy back into the battery when slowing down. Warranty is a decent three years. We’ve seen the factory (which, unusually, builds its own batteries) just outside Barcelona – this is one of the few European-made electric mopeds.

SEAT MÓ eScooter 125 – from £4,996

The MÓ eScooter125 represents the car brand’s first foray into electrified two-wheeled transport, aimed at both private buyers and fleet operators. Power comes from a 12bhp electric motor inside the rear wheel; 0-31mph takes 3.9 seconds and top speed is 59mph. A 5.6kWh battery feeds the motor and is good for a range of 85 miles according to SEAT; the firm reckons only a weekly charge will be required in most cases.

Charging can take place at a public point or at home, where the scooter’s battery can be removed and charged overnight from a three-pin socket. Fleet operators will be able to swap a charged battery in for a flat one, minimising turnaround times. The scooter also features regenerative braking and a reverse gear. Pulling the left-hand brake applies the brakes on both wheels, while pulling the right-hand brake only applies the front but engages the regenerative braking – amplifying the braking effect and recharging the battery.

Lexmoto Yadea – from £1,700

Lexmoto offers the cheapest electric moped on the UK market – that is, the cheapest one from a well established brand with a proper dealer network, rather than a random online seller. Based near Exeter, this high-volume importer outsells everyone else in the 50cc and 125cc petrol markets, and in late 2020 it launched a range of electric mopeds.

The G5 model we rode (actually costing £1,900) has everything you would expect from a modern electric moped. The battery hides under the floor but easily lifts out for charging – it’ll also charge in situ. There’s a big tablet sized dashboard with big clear battery level gauge, a low charge warning light, and estimated remaining range (so there’s no excuse for running out) with a clock. The rear hub motor does away with the need for a drive belt, and pushes the Yadea up to its 28mph top speed reasonably quickly.

In town, a loud ding-dong from the indicators warns pedestrians that you’re coming and the Yadea is Bluetooth-enabled to hook up with your phone, although the UK isn’t getting the relevant app, or not yet at least. Charging is a slow six to eight hours and Lexmoto claims a modest 35-mile range. At £1,700 though, the Yadea undercuts all the opposition and will be cheaper to run than any petrol scooter.

Niu Mqi Sport – from £2,156

Niu isn’t exactly a household name, but it has created a little niche for itself as one of the smarter electric moped makers. The Mqi Sport is one of latest variants on the theme, a moped limited to 28mph, but Niu also offers it in faster form with a 3Kw motor, claimed 60-mile range and 47mph top speed, which makes it easily quick enough to keep up with urban traffic.

Claimed ranges of electric mopeds can be about as accurate as the fuel-economy aspirations of ICE cars. One Niu we rode in 2019 it lived up to its official figure – the test bike had 35% battery left after 44 miles, so we were heading for a credible 65 miles to empty. The faster Nius have two batteries, both of which can be charged in situ or taken indoors to plug in. A full charge from flat takes 3.5 hours according to Niu, and the battery warranty runs to three years/20,000 miles, which is good.

Bluetooth is one of the Niu’s selling points – it links to your smartphone to show GPS, real-time diagnostics and an anti-theft alert – but the moped won’t swallow a week’s worth of shopping because all the under-seat space is filled with battery. At £2,156 after the government’s Plug-In Grant, the Mqi is well priced.

Zapp i300 Carbon – from £7,950

The Zapp i300 is not exactly undersold. It’s designed in Britain, with production now getting underway in Thailand, and its publicity refers to superbike-type acceleration and riding dynamics. five patent applications relating to motorcycle fundamentals and 50 new-to-industry advanced features. The motor is a ‘Super Twister’ and the two batteries are ‘Turbo Twins.’

Behind the hype, the Zapp really is a high-performance moped. The motor offers 14kW and a massive 587Nm of torque, backing up official claims of 0-50kph in 2.3 seconds and 0-100kph in 4.9 seconds – this is true motorcycle performance, although top speed is limited to 60mph. The chassis has a superbike flavour, too, with two-sensor ABS, fully adjustable suspension at both ends and a distinctive exoskeleton frame.

The twin batteries (sorry, can’t call them Turbo Twins) are very small and light, giving a range of only 37 miles. But Zapp reckons that with average European city daily mileage being only 12 miles, that’s enough, and the smaller batteries are easier to carry up to the office or flat for a recharge. Zapps are sold direct online, with annual servicing performed at the owner’s home by, wait for it. ‘Zappers’.

Cezeta – £TBC

Do you like retro? Who doesn’t, but the Cezeta isn’t some ersatz copy. Instead, it’s a faithful reproduction of an original Czech-made scooter from the late 1950s. Over 100,000 of these were sold across the Eastern Bloc from 1957-64 and in 2017 its Sputnik styling was reborn with an electric motor in place of the old 175cc two-stroke.

Production is strictly limited to around 50 per year in the Czech Republic, and the first series has sold out, though Cezeta is now taking orders for the second series, with production expected in mid-2021. Underneath the composite bodywork is a galvanised steel frame, disc brakes and a choice of motors giving 5.7kW to 9.2kW with batteries of 4kWh, 6kWh or 8.5kWh.

We haven’t tested the Cezeta, but the maker claims top speeds of 52mph to 75mph and ranges of 52-105 miles, depending on the motor and battery combination selected. All can be ridden on an A1 licence, so you won’t need a full motorcycle licence to ride one, just your CBT, theory and practical tests. The Cezeta isn’t cheap but it’s a unique machine that’ll certainly turn heads. And if you’re still not sure about buying one, there’s always the option of taking a trip to Prague and hiring one for a weekend.

Vespa Elettrica – from £5,040

A Vespa is the ultimate moped for many, and 18 million have been sold since the original was launched in 1946. Modern incarnations are still being made in Italy and the Elettrica was added in early 2019. Outwardly, it could be mistaken for a petrol Vespa (apart from some subtle blue pinstriping and lack of an exhaust) but underneath it’s very different.

The 50 or 125cc petrol motor is replaced by a 4kW electric motor (which is quite beefy for what is a moped-class bike) and generously sized 4.2kWh battery. So although the standard Elettrica is limited to 28-30mph, it gets up to speed pretty quickly and holds it up hills, something not all mopeds can manage. There’s also a faster 45mph version, which costs only £300 more. And being a Vespa, the dynamics are good – it’s light and manoeuvrable, quick to steer and easy to ride, plus has the Vespa heritage.

The TFT dash will integrate with your smartphone via the Vespa app, which enables you to make or receive calls, and has a sat nav and various other goodies. As you’d expect, the battery can be charged in situ or lifted out. The Elettrica is one of the most expensive electric mopeds on the market (the price here is after the Plug-in Grant), but it’s undeniably stylish.

Honda Benly e: – from £5,074

It took years for the world’s leading motorcycle manufacturer to finally launch an electric moped, and this is it. The Benly e: went on sale in Japan only, aimed squarely as small businesses such as fast food delivery, and there’s no sign of it coming to the UK. It’s a fairly conventional delivery moped, with flat luggage platforms front and rear plus a reverse assist feature for getting out of tight spots. The twin swappable batteries are small (1kWh each) and must be returned to Honda for recycling when they reach the end of their lives.

The Benly e: comes in e:1 (moped equivalent) and e:II (5.7PS) forms, both available in basic or ‘pro’ spec, the latter bringing a front basket, rear carrier, hand protectors and footbrake. With those small batteries the range is limited, Honda quoting about 55 miles at 18mph for the e:1 and about 26 miles for the e:II. That’s not much, but these smaller power packs reduce weight and cost, while business customers will have spare batteries on hand for Rapid swaps.

Super Soco CPX – from £3,599

Super Soco isn’t a household name in the UK yet, but it’s Smart little motorcycle-style electric bikes sell like hot cakes, topping the electric two-wheel charts for two years running. The range now includes the CUX moped, which features a built-in camera to record your commute and the CPX, a bigger 125cc-equivalent scooter built for longer commutes.

Physically bigger than the Niu, it should carry two people comfortably. With a 4kW rear hub motor delivering 171Nm, it tops out at 56mph and has a claimed range of 44 miles, or 87 miles for the optional twin-battery set up. Keep to a steady 25mph and Super Soco claims you can ride up to 112 miles.

There are convenient touches like a reverse function, LED headlight and a USB charge point. As with an increasing number of electric mopeds, the battery can be recharged on or off the bike – Super Soco reckons a full charge takes 3.5 hours and the battery has an excellent four-year warranty.

Rieju Nuuk – from £6,199

Best described as a moped/motorcycle hybrid, the Nuuk has the lowish step-through and smallish wheels of a moped, but the exposed frame, inverted forks and 280mm front disc brake of a motorcycle. With the option of a big luggage box to replace the passenger seat. it’s aimed at commercial fleets as much as private customers.

It’s made in Spain by Rieju, a long-established maker of small motorcycles. The Nuuk comes in 28mph moped or 70mph motorcycle form, the latter with a 10.5kW motor, and the standard claimed range is 70 miles or 50 miles respectively, although extra batteries can boost the the distance.

Batteries can be quickly accessed for swapping or recharging. Standard charging takes five hours, although there’s a fast-charge option of 1.2 hours. The Nuuk is different – it lacks weather protection and (unless you pay extra for the top box) any luggage room – but it’s an interesting addition to the market.

Artisan – from £2,636

Artisan is one of the pioneers of electric scooters, available in the UK for five years and starting out with a low price and low tech lead-acid batteries. It has since progressed to the industry standard lithium-ion cells and the price has gone up, but it’s still one of the cheaper options. Artisan also offers a tilting three-wheel moped aimed at fast food deliveries.

If you like faux-Vespa styling then you’ll love the Artisan. The cognoscenti will notice that the bodywork is plastic (not metal, like a genuine Vespa) and that there’s a bit too much chrome, but it does come in a wide choice of colours (seat as well as bodywork). This is a moped-class scooter, so it’s limited to 28mph, which can feel vulnerable on a busy road, but that’s endemic to all mopeds, whether electric or 50cc petrols.

Claimed range is just 25 miles, but the good news is that the battery lifts out for indoor charging and a second battery (£500 extra) slots in beside it to extend the range. Two and three-year battery warranties are becoming the norm, so the Artisan’s 12-month cover is a bit thin. But then, it is still the budget option.

recently, Artisan has added the ES1-PRO SuperMoto-style bike and an inner-city EVC 48mph scooter. In 2020, Artisan became the UK and Ireland importer and partner for Horwin Global, bringing to market the CR6. This was followed in 2021 with the EK3 and EK1. September 2021 saw the introduction of the Horwin CR6 Pro – the first five-speed manual electric motorbike with a traditional clutch.

Note: We’ve used ‘moped’ here as the generic term, as ‘scooter’ can be confused with stand-up scooters. Legally, ‘mopeds’ refer only to the smallest machines, limited to 28mph.

Choosing an Electric Scooter: 50cc or 125cc. Which One?

“cc” stands for cubic centimeters. It’s referring to the displacement capacity of the piston for producing power in petrol engines. As you know, electric scooters use electric power and this measurement cannot truly be applied to them. E-scooter’s power is measured in Watts or Kilowatts.

However, the “cc” expression is broadly known in the industry and is widely used to describe a petrol moped. This gives you an idea about its speed and license requirements to drive it.

What is the difference in speed?

The classification into 50cc or 125cc depends on the power of the motor and the maximum speed. If the power is between 1000 (1 kW) and 4000 (4 kW) Watts, and the speed does not exceed 50km/h, the electric scooter is a 50 cc equivalent.

With a power of the motor higher than 4000 (4 kW) Watts, the electric scooter is able to reach a higher top speed and is considered as a 125cc equivalent.

Some scooters, such as the Benzina Zero Duo. have 2700 Watts (2.7 kW) of power but can reach 65km/h speed and are thus also classified as the 125cc category.

What about the driving license?

In some states of Australia, a motorbike license is not required for a 50cc equivalent electric scooter. In QLD, WA, SA and NT (Australia) you can ride a moped just on your car licence whilst this is not the case in NSW, VIC, ACT and TAS. However in many European counteries like France for example, these scooters can be driven by people starting from 14-year-old with only the AM license. A license is not necessarily required for adults.

However, the electric scooters 125cc are faster and a license is usually needed to drive them. In certain cases, you just need a car license and some years of experience.

Please check that your local laws are before you start riding as each country and state have different rules.

How to choose between 50cc and 125cc?

Your Experience

Your choice will depend on your license, of course, but also on your experience with 2 wheels.If you are not used to driving a scooter, you will probably be more at ease with a 50cc one. And of course, if you are used to driving motorbikes, you will probably be happier with a faster 125cc.

Your Habits

You should ask yourself this question: why am I buying this scooter? Is it for your daily commutes in town? In this case, a 50cc will probably do the job.

Do you plan to go on road trips in the countryside? Consider a 125cc.

To sum up, the best scooter will be the one that matches your need!

Do you need more advice on buying an electric scooter? Check out our 7 pro tips for choosing the right electric scooter!

Tell us in the Комментарии и мнения владельцев below what type of electric scooter you plan to buy

Plug in, ride out: Best electric motorbikes of 2023

It’s getting hard to ignore the number of electric vehicles you see on the roads these days. What used to be a novel rarity is now commonplace with models from most major manufacturers and electric specialists like Tesla swooshing almost silently around the road network and filling motorway charge points.

It’s an especially charged topic in 2023, thanks to discussions surrounding the Government’s proposed ban on the sales of new petrol bikes in 2035 – the exact details of which are still to be ironed out.

And while many bikers still regard EVs as a threat to their way of life, one type of rider seems quite happy to adopt battery power: commuters.

Cities are filled with stand-up electric scooters (some legal, some not) and burgeoning low and ultra-low emissions zones are engulfing swathes of the commuter belt. Add to that the skyrocketing cost of petrol and diesel and it’s easy to see why those who commute by car might want to switch to something else.

And while a new Tesla will cost you north of £40k there are plenty of affordable small-capacity electric motorbikes that can be ridden on a CBT to get you to and from the office or railway station.

So what’s out there?

Comparing them in the car park at MCN’s offices, the BMW CE 04 maxi scooter, Super Soco TC Max 125-equivalent and Yadea G5S might look like awkward stablemates but there’s a reason we chose them for this test.

The BMW represents the luxurious, high-tech and expensive end of the market. The Super Soco is the people’s champ, a more affordable option that regularly appears in the sales charts. And the Yadea is the newcomer, a simple, cheap, knees-together scooter imported by Lexmoto.

The £12,270 (or £14,120 in the spec we are testing today) CE 04 would look right at home in the angular, whitewashed garage of a turtleneck-wearing architect. With styling that sits somewhere between a Tron Light Cycle and a Lego Technic build, the BMW will certainly turn heads. But there’s a hint of the kind of po-faced worthiness often associated with Tesla’s early adopters.

Fortunately, all that disappears the moment you twist the throttle. The BMW’s spaceship looks are backed up by spaceship performance from 0-30mph and the first wave of acceleration is more like engaging a warp drive than a throttle. I can’t think of anything else I’ve ridden that takes off from a standstill so quickly… including 200bhp superbikes.

It’s genuinely hilarious and it may explain why BMW saw fit to put the rear wheel quite so far away from the rest of the scooter. The CE 04’s wheelbase is a massive 1675mm, just 2mm shy of a Triumph Rocket 3, largely because the rear wheel is stretched out behind you like a drag bike.

⏱️ Join @benclarkejourno for #60secondswith the BMW CE 04 scooter and then read our ultimate electric bike guide here: https://t.co/wTOsDzGNkg piccom/SwmuaLlpvu

— Motor Cycle News (@MCNnews) February 3, 2023

I honestly think (and suspect BMW do too) that a shorter wheelbase and higher centre of gravity would result in riders “doing a Bautista” on their way out of a Starbucks car park. Performance plateaus from 30-50mph, but it still doesn’t take long to reach the limited top speed of 80mph – plenty for dual carriageway work.

Want to spend a bit less?

Super Soco’s £4399 TC Max (£4499 as tested) feels far more pedestrian than the BMW, but it’s still not what you would describe as slow. Again, performance off the line is impressive and it gets to its 60mph top speed faster than a petrol equivalent could.

The TC Max has a more motorcycle-esque layout than the BMW but it feels a little like one of those folding bicycles – some dimensions have been adapted specifically to create the impression of bigger bike ergonomics. The body is tall with low footpegs to compensate for the small wheels. But it works well and at 6ft, I can ride it comfortably.

Yadea’s G5S is a very small and lightweight option that would be best suited to a short dash across a city. The 55mph top speed limits the Yadea’s abilities in national speed limit sections, but it has just enough about it for a very short stretch if really needed. At £3699, the Yadea is the cheapest option here but it’s still not exactly peanuts.

Despite being a scooter, the BMW actually feels the most like a ‘proper’ motorcycle. Although this is mostly down to its 231kg heft – enough for BMW to feel the need for a reverse gear – you also sit with your feet either side of a central structure, which feels more bikey than the Yadea’s knees-together riding position.

The BMW’s weight means that the front suspension and tyre load up like a proper bike under braking, giving you feedback and stability. The way it responds to steering inputs mid corner feels very familiar too, and because of the battery regen system you even get engine braking. So much so, in fact, that you can almost abandon using the brakes around town.

Although the Super Soco is the most motorcycle-shaped model here, its small size and low weight mean that it has the feel of an incredibly fast bicycle rather than a motorbike. This does mean you sacrifice a bit of front-end feel, but that’s not really an issue on a bike of this type.

Packed with gizmos

As you’d expect, the BMW has the most gizmos. Features like heated grips, smartphone connectivity and a watertight, ventilated phone charging compartment are nice touches. Keyless tech is de rigueur in the electric bike world and all three of the bikes have it.

The BMW key fob is pretty big and cumbersome (it’s the size of a car fob) but you can stick it in a and forget about it. The Super Soco’s is fairly big and circular and annoyingly you need to use its buttons for locking and unlocking the bike so the alarm deactivates. This means the fob has to live somewhere accessible, so its size is a bit annoying.

Both the Yadea and the Super Soco come equipped with alarms and systems that lock the rear wheel if you try to push them away without the key. This scuppers the preferred bike thief’s method of pushing a rider along with an outstretched leg and a TMAX, something that could still be done to the BMW.

The Super Soco also comes with a SIM card that’s preloaded with two years of data and allows you to track the bike in real time through an app. Impressive stuff for the cheaper end of the market!

The Yadea and the Super Soco both have removeable batteries, meaning you can whip them out at your home or office and stick them on charge at a three-pin power outlet. The BMW, meanwhile, has a built-in battery, so you need to be able to get the bike to the socket. It’s the only option here that can use a wall box or public charging station but it’s also the least convenient if you live in a flat and have no outdoor sockets.

The verdict

The BMW CE 04 is an impressive bit of kit and gives me hope for an electrified biking future but I cannot justify the price. The version we tested had a few extras that took the price to £14,120, which isn’t a problem if you are the aforementioned architect but as an option for a normal person to get to a normal job, it’s flippin’ ridiculous.

So, with the BMW ruled out, it’s a straight fight between the Yadea and the Super Soco and my money would go with the latter. Sadly, because the Yadea’s volume is largely filled with batteries there’s no practical advantage to its scootery shape. It’s also let down by a pitiful ground clearance.

Meanwhile, the Super Soco is just bikey-enough to scratch the riding itch, fun to chuck around in a city centre and fast enough to tackle big roads if you need to. The price of electricity may be high right now, but even so a full charge will still only be around 95p. That means it’ll cost you around 1.6p per mile.

What about electric leisure motorbikes?

Commuting is one thing, but it’s arguably the simplest use-case going as there’s no need to worry about where you are going to charge the bike. You either do it at the home or the work end of the journey.

But many bikers restrict their riding to their own time; from Sunday blasts or long weekends to full on bike tours, greenlaning or even trackdays. So what does the electric world have to offer for these kinds of riders?

Electric bikes may not be troubling their petrol equivalents for most riders in this sector just yet, but ranges well over 100 miles are already possible, making an EV bike a more viable proposition.

Recharge times are dropping too as technology improves. A full battery in 30 minutes isn’t an unrealistic ask these days as high quality, high speed chargers become more prevalent and easier to use.

Here is a list of what we consider the most relevant large-capacity electric motorcycles in 2023.

Zero DSR/X

Power 100bhp | Weight 247kg | Range 115 miles | Charge time 1hr (with Rapid charge module)

Along with the Energica Experia below, the Zero DSR/X is claimed to be a fully-fledged adventure bike powered by electricity.

We said: “Weight is comparable to a conventional adventure bike. Lean-sensitive rider aids, (including hill control) both on and off-road, are useful and effective. The bike is comfortable, smooth, vibration-free, silent, easy to ride both on tarmac and the dirt, and has that instant surge of torque that will make even petrol heads smile.”

Energica Experia

Power 100.6bhp | Weight 260kg | Range 160 miles | Charge time 50 minutes (with fast charger)

The Energica Experia is claimed to be a ‘Green Tourer’ by the Italian firm and was launched at the end of 2022 as their new flagship model. Real world range figures fell well short of the claimed 160 miles combined range Energica claim but a 50 minute fast charge is still impressive.

We said: “If you could take price and range out of the equation, the Experia is a very impressive motorcycle. The electric motor is superb, the level of tech comparable to petrol-powered rivals (aside from a lack of semi-active suspension) and the handling and comfort levels certainly good enough to class it as a sports tourer.”

Arc Vector

Power 115bhp | Weight 240kg | Range 270 miles | Charge time 40 minutes (with CCS Type 2 Rapid Charger)

Ok, so the Arc is unlikely to grace very many garages and carparks around the country. But the £90,000 brainchild of ex-Jaguar/Land Rover designer Mark Truman is important nonetheless. Right at the vanguard of new tech and pushing the boundaries of what’s possible, the Arc represents the ghost of electric bikes future.

We said: “Throwing a leg over a motorcycle that costs the same as a Ducati Superleggera is always intimidating enough, but there’s a lot else going on to unnerve you at first. There’s a sequence of buttons to push on the Domino switchgear to make it live and after that the engine waits for you silently, which is always slightly sinister on an electric bike.”

Zero S

Power 59bhp | Weight 190kg | Range 150 miles | Charge time 10.5hrs

It’s not as wild as the SR series of bikes, but the S is a realistic electric commuter bike that’s also genuinely fun to ride.

We said: “A reasonably quick yet relaxed roadster – 59bhp peak power, 86mph top speed – which is incredibly simple to ride and costs peanuts to run. The range and recharge time realistically limit its role to the daily commute and short leisure rides, which is also where the relatively basic chassis parts feel most at home.”

Zero SR/S

Power 110bhp | Weight 235kg | Range 95 miles | Charge time 2.5hrs (Type 2 charger)

This faired option is one of the sportiest electrics on the market right now but is more akin to a petrol sports tourer than a superbike.

We said: “The Zero proves electric can be not only practical but also bloody enjoyable. Fast? Very. Engaging? Extremely. Practical and usable? Yes, all that. The SR/S is a great bike that I genuinely love riding and shows electric bikes now really are worthy of attention. Imagine a silent and refined (and faster) Kawasaki Ninja 1000SX, and you’re just about there.”

Energica Eva Ribelle

Power 144bhp | Weight 270kg | Range 143 miles | Charge time 42mins (to 80% on Fast Charger)

The Energica Eva Ribelle super naked is on borrowed time, with the whole Energica range expected to be replaced with bikes based on the Experia platform in 2023. It’s still a significant bike that put electric power on the map when it was first released in many ways.

We said: “The Eva Ribelle accelerates with the kind of ferocity a superbike would be proud of, is solid in the corners and has a riding position that mixes aggression with comfort. It’s smooth, quiet, easy to ride, well-built, lavishly equipped and its new battery promises to deliver a more usable range.”

Harley-Davidson Livewire

Power 104bhp | Weight 249kg | Range 110 miles | Charge time 1hr (Fast Charger)

An OG of the electric bike scene, the Harley-Davidson Livewire was launched in 2019 and was the first serious motorbike to be brought to market by a mainstream manufacturer. It seemed unbelievable at the time that the quintessentially American brand famous for its petrol V-twins would turn to battery power.

Harley have spun the model off into its own marque – so it’s officially called the Livewire One now – but the branding exercise hasn’t reached the UK just yet.

We said: “On paper the LiveWire electric motorbike may appear heavy, lacking battery range and short on power and torque, but riding it tells a different story. It accelerates with the ferocity of a superbike, sounds like a fighter jet and even throbs like a pounding heartbeat at a standstill.”

Zero SR/F

Power 110bhp | Weight 220kg | Range 82 miles | Charge time 1hr (Fast Charger)

The Zero SR/F closed the style and performance gap between their previous electric offerings and modern internal combustion bikes – and took the award for MCN’s Best Electric Motorcycle in 2019.

We said: “The Zero SR/F is a huge leap forwards in speed, sophistication and recharge time over the firm’s previous generation of bikes. The result is easily the best road-going electric bike yet, offering truly comparable power, weight, handling and excitement to a regular roadster. But despite closing the gap on petrol bikes, for now the catches remain the same three issues: range; recharge time; and price.”

best, electric, mopeds, 2022

Energica Ego

Power 136bhp | Weight 258kg | Range 90-120 miles | Charge time 30mins (85% using Fast Charger)

For 2017 we created an entire new category for the MCN Awards: Electric bike of the year. The Energica Ego took the first ever award after impressing us both on road and track, as well as around the TT course.

The Ego is also the basis for the racers that were used in the single-make MotoE series, from 2019 until Ducati took over from 2023.

We said: “Are electric bikes the future of motorcycling? Well, the Energica Ego has one of the most exciting power deliveries of any engine we’ve ever tried. It’s easy to ride and handles superbly, despite its weight.”

Electric motorbike FAQs

Q: Is an electric motorcycle worth it?

A: This depends heavily on how you use the bike, because electric bikes are very expensive relative to conventional motorcycles of similar performance. You’ll need to cover a lot of miles on electricity in order to pay back the premium in most cases.

best, electric, mopeds, 2022

However, with the introduction of finance deals specifically aimed at making these bikes more affordable by spreading the cost over long periods, it’s likely costs will drop at some point in the coming years.

Q: Are electric motorcycles good for beginners?

A: The lower-powered versions are great, because they’re twist-and-go bikes, which means they don’t require gear changes. You can also get some that are equivalent to a 125cc petrol bike, which means you don’t need to pass the full bike test in order to ride one. You’ll just need a provisional driving licence and a day-long CBT course. A good example of this is the Super Soco TC Max.

Of course, there are now several electric bikes available with far higher performance.

Q: Are electric motorbikes fun?

A: They’re different to a petrol-powered bike, but do have their advantages – primarily, that they usually have 100% of their torque available at 0rpm, which makes them feel properly Rapid, even when they’re not. They’re also smoother.

Q: Is an electric motorbike harder to insure?

A: Our specialists at MCN Compare are on hand to answer this question. Head this way for their advice.

The Best Electric Motorcycles Of 2023

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Imagine: the wind rushing through your hair as you cruise, streamlining down the highway; passers-by eyeing your sweet ride; no choking petrol fumes in your wake. And that’s just a teaser of what you’ll experience riding one of the best electric motorcycles of 2023. Yes, electric sports bikes have come a long way, and they’re calling out for you to come along for the ride.

Whether you dream of open roads, never-ending horizons, and lush wilderness, or you have the more practical need of getting from A to B (who are we kidding, we mean home-to-office, of course)—there’s an electric motorbike on the market for you.

With huge innovations in eco-friendly transport (think electric cars, e-bikes, and the ubiquitous e-scooter), it’s no wonder that e-motorcycles have upped their design game, too. Providing low-noise, fume-free, and smooth-sailing journeys, what’s not to like? And of course, the planet will thank you. You can get your kids au fait early on with the great range of mini bikes and kid’s electric cars out there, too.

Naturally, everyone’s different and desires a different spec from their e-motorcycle. We’ve done the legwork for you and found the quickest-charging, longest-range, most powerful, and best budget electric motorbikes of this year, so you can take your pick. For style and speed with a sustainable spin, we’ve got it all.

For 2023, the Cake Kalk INK, BMW CE 04, and Onyx RCR, among many others, make their first appearance on our ranking of the best electric motorcycles of the year.

After our ranking of the best electric motorbikes of 2023, take a look at our buying guide to see what you should pay attention to when shopping for an EV bike. We also explain the methodology behind our ranking of the top bikes of the year.

The 15 best electric motorcycles of 2023

RankModelCategory
1 Energica Experia Overall best
2 Cake Kalk INK Best value
3 BMW CE 04 Best premium
4 Zero FX Best sports bike
5 Onyx RCR Best street bike
6 Vespa Elettrica Best electric scooter
7 Lightning LS-218 Fastest motorbike
8 Arc Vector Most stylish
9 Pursang E-Tracker Best for offroad
10 Cake Osa Flex Best for varied terrain
11 Damon Hypersport Premier Best range
12 Livewire S2 Del Mar Best for tech lovers
13 Evoke 6061 Fastest charge
14 Super Soco TC Most classic styling
15 Sondors Metacycle Best budget

As a bonus, check the upcoming 2023 electric motorbikes that we’re most excited about after the list.

After our ranking of the best electric motorbikes of 2023, take a look at our buying guide to see what you should pay attention to when shopping for an EV bike. We also explain the methodology behind our ranking of the top bikes of the year.

Energica Experia: Overall best electric motorcycle

When anyone brings up electric motorcycles, it’s easy to envision a dead battery cutting short the fun. Due to the logistical nightmare of squeezing large, heavy batteries onto a small frame, touring bikes have been out of the question.

Until now. Energica Experia is our top choice for an electric motorcycle as it’s gone somewhere others haven’t dared. It has the longest claimed range of any production motorcycle on the market, with up to 261 miles (420 km) of city driving on one charge.

But city driving isn’t the goal of touring. At highway speeds, the range is limited to 130 miles (209 km), but three different charging methods can get you back on the road in a hurry.

The Energica Experia has a great overall stance and handling, combined with a charming aerodynamic style. It is hands down the best electric motorcycle to hit the market.

Price: 25,880
Engine power: 75 kW – 102 HP
Top speed: 180 km/h – 112 mph
Acceleration: 0-100 km/h – 0-62 mph: 3.5 sec
Range: 256 km – 160 miles
Website: energicamotor.com
best, electric, mopeds, 2022

Cake Kalk INK Electric Motorbike: Best value EV motorcycle

By mimicking the dual-sport motorcycle, Cake has created a cheap electric motorcycle that can silently sprint around trails. It started as an off-road-only model, but recent upgrades allow street legal use, registered as a 125cc bike in the USA and EU.

If you want something that’s not quite a full-size motorcycle yet not as compact as an electric bicycle, the Cake Kalk INK is a perfect choice. It’s lightweight and nimble, yet still able to deliver some power when you want it.

The Cake Kalk INK incorporated three ride modes that adjust speed and power to provide different levels of battery range. Another three braking modes can perfectly adjust what happens when you lift off the accelerator to match your conditions.

Price: 11,580
Engine power: 11 kW – 15 HP
Top speed: 90 km/h – 56mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 3 hours of trail/enduro riding
Website: huckberry.com

BMW CE 04: Best premium electric motorbike

If there’s one brand that’s no stranger to bringing advanced electric variants to the streets, BMW deserves some credit. The German automaker introduced futuristic-looking EVs over a decade ago and continues to reshape the automotive and motorcycle industries with new platforms.

The BMW CE 04 is not your average motorcycle. Its low-slung shape with an elongated bench seat might remind you of a modified jetski out of water. But that’s far from the truth.

The reality is that this beast utilizes a compact yet powerful motor that pairs with a thin battery pack. This leaves you plenty of room for seating two passengers or extra gear, plus a sizable storage compartment that helps make practical daily use a breeze.

The BMW CE 04 takes a giant step forward in electric motorcycle evolution. Are you ready to take the leap?

Price: 11,795
Engine power: 31 kW – 42 HP
Top speed: 121 km/h – 75 mph
Acceleration: 0–50 km/h – 0-31.1 mph: 2.6 sec
Range: 129 km – 80 Mi
Website: bmwmotorcycles.com

Zero FX: Best electric sports bike

It takes time to perfect any craft. And with over a decade of EV motorcycle production under its belt, Zero is staying ahead of the pack in many ways.

The Zero FX is most at home on the trails, where it will let you FOCUS on finding the right line while cruising through nature. But it’s a jack of all trades. You can throw it around city streets with just as much enthusiasm as your off-road adventures.

The chassis is built from aircraft aluminum and has been shaved down over many years of production, providing one of the best power-to-weight ratios on the market. Simply put, the Zero FX electric sports bike will blow your mind regardless of the conditions under the tires.

Price: 12,995
Engine power: 34 kW – 46 HP
Top speed: 137 km/h – 85 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 111 km – 69 miles
Website: zeromotorcycles.com

Onyx RCR Electric Motorbike: Best electric street bike

It’s a bird… it’s a plane. No, it’s the Onyx RCR electric street bike. Fitting precisely into no category, this sleek offering straddles the line between an e-bike and an electric motorcycle.

One thing’s for certain. The Onyx RCR brings back nostalgia with its cafe-racer looks and woodgrain decals. It’s available in two different models, one designed for street use and one for trail riding. You can also customize battery packs, suspension heights, and paint colors.

This E motorcycle is much more suitable for slower speeds, and the street-legal mode only goes up to 20 mph (32 km/h). But as an affordable electric street bike, this can win over your heart with one quick ride.

Price: 5,750
Engine power: 13 kW – 17 HP
Top speed: 97 km/h – 60 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 193 km – 120 miles
Website: huckberry.com

Vespa Elettrica: Best electric scooter

Kleenex, Google, Band-Aid. Few brands are so iconic that their trademarked product name takes over the generic term. When it comes to scooters, Vespa is the name of the game and has been since the 1940s.

Today’s Vespas aren’t like that of the past. While the exterior design might have you think otherwise, the Vespa Elettrica uses a fully electric drivetrain to make getting a town an absolute joy.

The power is on the lower end of the scale, but you won’t notice thanks to the respectable 148 lb-ft of instant torque. The inboard display seamlessly connects to your phone. And you have your choice of six stylish colors to make this electric motorcycle scooter your own.

If you don’t care about the Vespa brand name, check out the Piaggio 1. This cheaper alternative is based on the same platform and has similar performance.

Price: 7,499
Engine power: 4 kW – 5 HP
Top speed: 70 km/h – 43 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 100 km – 62 miles
Website: vespa.com

Lightning LS-218: Fastest electric motorbike

Some electric motorcycles are meant for city streets or off-road trails. But when it comes to the Lightning LS-218, there is one thing it seeks most of all. The wide-open road.

While the Voxan Wattman is technically the fastest motorcycle, it’s not approved for street use. On the other hand, the Lightning LS-218 can charge down the road at a blistering 218 mph or more, all while silently slipping through the tarmac.

The cost of this powerful E motorcycle is magnitudes more than most bikes, but it has every right to charge the premium. Its incredible design brings out the best in sports bike styling, while the range, acceleration, and top speed are all at the top of the game.

Price: 38,888
Engine power: 150 kW – 200 HP
Top speed: 351 km/h – 218 mph
Acceleration: 0-60 mph: 2.2 sec
Range: 290 km – 180 miles
Website: lightningmotorcycle.com

Arc Vector: Most stylish electric motorcycle

Not many companies have the luxury of using a no-holds-barred approach. ARC is one of the lucky few that does. The result is an impeccable work of art, making the Arc Vector our top choice for style.

But the beauty of this electric street bike is more than skin deep. It’s infused into every component, from the carbon fiber swing arms to the modular battery monocoque platform. The Arc Vector is craftsmanship redefined.

Claiming the title of the world’s most advanced motorcycle, the Vector incorporates a Human Machine Interface with an Arc Pilot System heads-up display helmet and the game-changing Origin Jacket with active feedback. It is like nothing else the world has seen.

Price: £90,000 (~120,000 USD)
Engine power: 87 kW – 117 HP
Top speed: 351 km/h – 218 mph
Acceleration: 0-100 km/h – 0-62 mph: 3.2 sec
Range: 436 km – 271 miles
Website: arcvehicle.com

Pursang E-Tracker: Best electric motorcycle for off-road

One incredible part of the electric motorbike revolution is the innovation coming from new companies. The Spanish-based Pursang is among the top in the segment, offering an excellent option for those who want to fit in anywhere they can drive on two wheels.

best, electric, mopeds, 2022

The Pursang E-Track fuses a chic look with a powerful Bosch motor and a driving position that’s equally great for relaxed cruising and aggressive off-road sessions. The color TFT screen provides all the details you need and nothing you don’t.

The E-Track is an electric sports bike for those who want it all. There is enough power to have fun, a solid range to get you where you need to go, and it’s all dressed up in a package that’ll attract attention everywhere you go.

Price: 14,900
Engine power: 11 kW – 15 HP
Top speed: 110 km/h – 68 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 140 km – 87 miles
Website: pursangmotorcycles.com

Cake Osa Flex: Best E motorcycle for varied terrain

Being a jack of all trades isn’t easy. It requires flexibility and adapting to individual demands. Some electric motorcycles are built for one purpose. Others can handle it all.

When versatility is your priority, turn to the Cake Osa Flex. This high-performance utility machine is geared up with over a thousand accessory combinations to handle any situation with ease. It’s the Swiss Army knife of electric motorcycle scooters.

The battery pack has multiple power outlets, letting it double as a portable power station. It’s a workbench on wheels mixed with a commuter bike that can be packed with gear. The Cake Osa Flex is fully street-legal and ready to be registered as a 50cc bike.

Price: 8,880
Engine power: 5 kW – 7 HP
Top speed: 45 km/h – 28 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 92 km – 57 miles
Website: huckberry.com

Damon Hypersport Premier: Best electric motorbike for range

Hopping on two wheels isn’t for the faint of heart. But for those road warriors who want the full experience, the Damon Hypersport is worth checking out.

As one of the best electric roadsters on two wheels, the Hypersport pushes out a whopping 200 horsepower and can get up to 60 mph in less than three seconds. But it also hits the mark when it comes to longevity, with an impressive 200-mile (322 km) range.

The Damon Hypersport is engineered to take you faster, safer, and farther. You can instantly transform the riding position on the fly to avoid fatigue or gear up for the curves. An incorporated CoPilot system uses artificial intelligence to keep tabs on everything around you and warn of any hazards.

It’s the electric motorcycle for adults that has your back.

Price: 19,000
Engine power: 149 kW – 200 HP
Top speed: 322 km/h – 200 mph
Acceleration: 0-60 mph:
Range: 322 km – 200 miles
Website: damon.com

Livewire S2 Del Mar: Best electric street bike for tech lovers

Harley Davidson’s image doesn’t blend well with the electric motorcycle revolution. But the brand’s spinoff EV motorcycle group, Livewire, is doing all it can to show Harley riders that electric motorbikes are the way of the future. And the S2 Del Mar has grabbed the spotlight.

At first glance, it’s mostly what you’d expect from a modern Harley bike. It’s a robust motorcycle that has only a few cues indicating the electric platform, most notable are the heat transfer fins flanking the bike.

But this isn’t Livewire’s first take. It’s a more nimble, lighter, and less expensive version of the Livewire ONE, yet it still has all the power and fun you could want.

The exclusive Del Mar Launch Edition S2 features an exclusive paint scheme and wheel design, but the regular production models are sure to impress with looks just as much as the legendary Harley Davidson ride, even if it doesn’t rumble as you’d expect.

Price: 17,699
Engine power: 59.6 kW – 80 HP (est.)
Top speed: Unspecified
Acceleration: 0-60 mph: 3.1 sec
Range: 177 km – 110 miles
Website: livewire.com

Evoke 6061: Fastest charge electric motorbike

Battery electric vehicles have one serious disadvantage. When they run out of juice, it can be a long time before they’re ready to hit the road again.

The Evoke 6061 turns that idea about-face. By using a 336-volt battery pack, it can recharge up to 80% in 15 minutes. Just enough time for you to shake off any road fatigue, refuel your body, and hop back on.

This hand-assembled new electric motorcycle pleases the eye with its minimalistic design that puts the aluminum twin-plate frame in the spotlight. But the real treat comes when you turn the throttle. The impressive 160-horsepower motor rockets up to 62 mph in just 2.6 seconds.

The Evoke 6061 is making waves in the electric motorcycle segment. And for good reason.

Price: 24,995
Engine power: 120 kW – 160 HP
Top speed: 230 km/h – 143 mph
Acceleration: 0-100 km/h – 0-62 mph: 2.6 sec
Range: 470 km – 292 miles
Website: evokemotorcycles.com

Super Soco TC: Most classic styling

There’s nothing better than getting on two wheels to hop around the city. Especially if those two wheels are packed with class and style.

The Super Soco TC might not be the most powerful electric motorcycle on the road, but its cafe-racer-inspired shape brings back fond memories as it glides down the road. The affordable price tag, removable battery packs, and comfortable riding position make it an excellent choice for short commutes or joy rides.

The graceful design elements do an incredible job of merging new-world technology with classic styling. It has a large display between the bars and an oversized LED headlight placed front and center. It’s pure joy to ride and look at.

Price: 3,330
Engine power: 1.9 kW – 2.5 horsepower
Top speed: 45 km/h – 28 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 48 km – 30 miles
Website: vmotosoco.com

Sondors Metacycle: Best cheap electric motorcycle

Take one look at the Sondors Metacycle and it’s clear that it breaks new ground. The Metacycle isn’t just a model name, it’s the introduction of a new segment that’s more powerful than most electric bicycles but not quite up to the full performance of a motorcycle.

It’s one of the best cheap electric motorcycles around, with an impressive 80 mph top speed and up to 80 miles on a single charge. The battery pack is easily removable, so you can park on the street and bring it inside when it needs to charge up away from home.

The Sondors Metacycle is the guilt-free, hassle-free way to get around town. It’s sure to put a smile on your face while letting you put your hard-earned cash to the best use possible.

Price: 6,500
Engine power: 14.5 kW – 20 HP
Top speed: 129 km/h – 80 mph
Acceleration: Unspecified
Range: 129 km – 80 miles
Website: sondors.com

Bonus: The upcoming electric motorcycles we’re most excited about

What’s that we see glinting on the horizon? Oh, just the hottest electric motorcycles hitting the market very soon:

  • Switch Scrambler – Make it yours: the Switch Scrambler is totally customizable, and whatever style choices you make, you can be sure it’ll look slick. It’s currently in the ABS testing phase and will be heading for full production later in the year.
  • DAB Concept-E – One for the tech-fiends, the DAB Concept-E offers incredibly high-end components for a seamless experience. The slightly smaller-than-average battery means this one’s better for short-range city-riding rather than long journeys.
  • Husqvarna E-Pilen – This electric motorcycle for adults is still in its conceptual phase, but it’ll be all the better for it. With a vroom-vroom aesthetic and plans for whippet-like speeds, the Husqvarna E-Pilen is certainly one to keep your eye on. Look out for full production within the next 2 years.
  • Ducati Electric Racer – Still a bit of an enigma, the new model is currently being tested. When it’s finally released, the Ducati Electric Racer will be used for the MotoE series in 2023, taking the place of Energica as the official motorcycle supplier. Well, if it’s good enough for the pros…

With so many ground-breaking electric motorcycles entering the market – this could be the year electric begins to surpass petrol. We are seeing competitions where electric motorcycles are now dominating like the Malle Mile. We predict that we are going to see this happening in more and more motorcycle categories now.

Tobin Page, Australian Electric Motor Co

Advantages and disadvantages of electric motorcycles

Electric motorcycles have many advantages. Ease of maintenance, instant torque, and whisper-quiet noise levels are some of the top benefits.

But there are some disadvantages to electric motorbikes too. The main issues to consider are the limited range, charging time and infrastructure, and potential battery replacement needs.

The electric motorcycle that’s best for you

powerful than an electric bicycle, lower profile than an electric car: If you’re looking for a sustainable vehicle that’s a good all-around compromise between the two, you can’t go wrong with an electric motorcycle. In particular, they’re usually more cost-effective than an electric car – and they generally feature shorter recharge times, which is a definite plus.

If you’re looking to purchase an electric motorbike, there are a couple of features you should pay close attention to. These include:

  • Range. As an EV, an electric motorbike does have a specific maximum distance that it can travel before you’re going to need to find a way to recharge. If you are using your electric motorcycle mainly for commuting, you may be able to select a bike with a lower range and prioritize other features. If you’re planning on adventuring further away from home, it might be a good idea to select one with a larger range – such as the Damon Hypersport Premier.
  • Comfort. Motorcycles aren’t known for being the most comfortable of vehicles, but if you’re planning on riding it a lot, a little comfort will go a long way. Check to see what the seat is made of, whether the pedals are adjustable, and if the shocks of your future bike promise a bump-free ride.
  • Safety. Motorcycles have gotten poor press in the past for their lack of safety features. The modern EV motorbike market is compensating for this with new high-tech safety features each year, such as 360-degree cameras and Smart rider assistance. If you’re at all worried about your safety while you’re zipping around on your motorbike, it’s a good idea to invest in a high-tech motorcycle that has these options.

Methodology: How we select, test, and rank the best options on the market

To find the best electric motorcycles on today’s market, we ranked the features we deemed most important – such as safety and range, as well as power, style, and comfort – and looked at all of the motorcycles that have come out recently (and will come out over the course of this year). The master list we came up with featured several sophisticated, powerful motorbikes!

We ranked each of these motorcycles, combing through reviews and testimonials until we had a ranking that we were ready to share. Finally, we picked one element from each bike to emphasize to award each a title as winner of a specific category.

Frequently asked questions about the best electric motorcycles

The Energica Experia is the best electric motorcycle of 2023. With a range of 160 miles (or 256 km), this sweet ride could see you across country borders if you choose. Not to mention, the uber-cool aesthetic and lightning-fast top speed seal the deal.

At just 5,000, the Sondors Metacycle is the cheapest electric motorcycle of 2023. It brings great value, backing its affordable price with a good range and a top speed that rivals several others in this competitive market.

Able to travel a lengthy 482 km (300 miles) on a single charge, the Damon Hypersport Premier is a true pegasus. Oh, and you won’t be meandering along, either: with a max speed of 200 mph (420 km/h), you’ll certainly feel the wind in your hair on this impressive bike.

While e-motorcycles currently sit on the higher end of the price spectrum, they are the transport of our epoche. Boasting quiet operation, no fumes, and of course, minimizing your carbon footprint, e-motorcycles are harbingers of an eco-friendly future. Check our round-up of the top electric motorcycles of 2023 to find the best one for you.

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