Best Electric Bikes for Seniors 2023. Mid drive electric trike

Best Electric Bikes for Seniors 2023

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Whether you’re looking to get back on a bicycle for the first time in years or you’re just looking for a forgiving way to get back in shape, the number of seniors getting into e-bikes has exploded over the past several years.

The team at Electric Bike Report is often asked for our opinion on the best electric bikes for seniors, enough so that we put our heads together and came up with this list of our favorites.

Electric bikes have fast emerged as one of the most low-impact and most senior-friendly modes of exercise. While the small motor helps take the edge off obstacles — like hills — that may have kept some seniors off traditional pedal bikes in the past, they still require enough physical effort to make for a great workout. They’ve also been proven to help maintain cognitive and mental health among older riders — the light assist from an e-bike, according to one study, can inspire confidence and improve self-esteem in older people who may feel limited by mobility issues.

Thanks to the assistance of a motor and battery, there’s a laundry list of e-bikes that work well for seniors. This list is a selection of our favorites.

How we picked the best e-bikes for seniors

There are undoubtedly many seniors who read the above list and scoff because the bikes we chose are too laid back or aren’t fast enough.

That’s fine, we’ve got recommendations for other e-bikes (like electric fat bikes and high-speed commuters) that might suit your tastes better. But while what makes someone a “senior” is nothing more than their age, there are certain considerations that often come up when we get asked for our opinion on the best e-bikes for older riders. Those considerations often involve mobility constraints, concerns over balance and flexibility and whether a bike’s riding position is too aggressive. Oftentimes, on top of any one of those considerations, this is that person’s first time back on a bicycle in a long, long time.

This list was made with those seniors in mind.

We used a few key criteria to compile this list, mainly:

  • Stability and comfort: Comfort and how stable they feel on the bike is often high on the mind of older riders. Bikes that earn a spot on this list shouldn’t just be supportive, they should invoke a feeling of confidence in corners and over varying terrain.
  • Quality and components: We evaluate each bike’s spec sheet to make sure manufacturers are making good component choices; a good bike is much more than its frame.
  • Value: What are you getting for your money? Are the components better than average and is the craftsmanship on par? We also account for things more intangible than parts bolted to the bike, such as quality customer support, brand reputation and the availability of good in-person service.
  • Power and range: How fast does the bike go and how far can I ride on a single charge? These questions are often the first on the mind of someone shopping for a new e-bike so they’re at the top of our mind, too.
  • Was it built specifically with seniors in mind?: This may seem like an obvious one, but we tried to find e-bikes built specifically for older generations of riders. Do these design characteristics make sense and are they executed well?

This list does not cover every single bike on the market today that would be a good option for seniors and older riders. In fact, I think most of the EBR staff would argue that almost any e-bike would be a good option for seniors. But, based on a plethora of reader questions (we get TONS of questions about e-bikes for seniors), we compiled this list of our recommendations that we feel are suited best for the fast-growing demographic of older e-bike enthusiasts.

Rad Power Bikes RadCity 5 Plus ST

When considering our list of the Best Electric Bikes for Seniors, the Dutch-inspired RadCity 5 ST (step-through), has the “whole enchilada.” This user-friendly e-bike from Rad Power Bikes has the main features and components – comfort, stability, power and quality – that are preferred by older riders.

Classic design and exceptional performance are two distinctions not always found on electric bikes. The classic Dutch style provides a posture for comfortable riding, and the step-through frame produces rider stability. Powered by a 750-watt rear hub motor, the RadCity 5 ST cruises with distinction, and never feels like it wants to jump out from under you.

Energizing the sleekly integrated 12.3-amp hour battery, sleekly integrated into the frame bottom tube, to help you travel up to 50 miles between charges. Helping you maintain good looks while in a logjam, the half-twist grip throttle gives you the quick acceleration you need to dart ahead.

As this bike makes you look good as you go, it also confers an air of eminence as you stop. The hydraulic brakes perform well and the suspension forks keep you in control. The medium size aluminum frame can accommodate riders ranging in height from 4’8” to 6’0”. The tires are 27.5” x 2” puncture-resistant tires and you get riding experience that makes you feel in full control.

With its 15-inch seat post tube, this bike is sure to be a hit with shorter riders. The 275 lbs capacity allows for heavier riders or riding with cargo, using one or more of the optional rack accessories.

Looking at all the features this e-bike includes, the RadCity 5 ST is a great deal.

Pro’s

  • Stable, comfortable posture makes it easy to climb aboard and ride for miles.
  • Predictable handling, the power from the 750W motor is nice and moderate at low speed with plenty of torque for climbing.
  • Rad’s reputation in the affordable customer service
  • Looks
  • The NUTT hydraulic disk brakes are spectacular under hard braking. This bike set a new record for the best stopping distance of any e-bike we’ve reviewed.
  • Rear rack capable of carrying lbs of cargo.

Con’s

  • The cable tidiness from the handlebars can be better. Instead of shortening cables where needed, they’re managed in zip-tied clumps that detract from the overall finish of the bike.
  • The dual display setup is a unique and useful design, but the left-hand display can be tough to read in direct sunlight.

Blix Sol Eclipse

Many senior riders will appreciate the Blix Sol Eclipse as a classic step-thru beach cruiser. It’s comfort, control and stability will make you want to ride it often. Its stylish looks are enhanced by its powerful 750-watt motor that can really climb hills.

This Class 2 e-bike has a throttle that gives you that extra oomph when you need it. The motor is managed by the pedal assist system (PAS) featuring 5 levels that will take you up to 20 mph. Energy is provided by the 48-volt, 12.8 amp-hour battery that will take you up to 45 miles between charges. The 17.8” medium/large frame accommodates riders between the height of 5-1 to 6-2. Enhancing riding comfort is the comfy wide seat.

Designed to provide an upright riding position, this bike is great for casual cruising down any street, path, or trail. The Sol Eclipse comes with a front cargo rack (50 lbs capacity) and a rear rack (55 lbs capacity) that will help carry groceries, or a little one in style. The total capacity is 270 lbs, and most child bike seats can be mounted on the rear rack. Total weight of this e-bike is 56 lbs, which makes lifting a little easier than other cruiser e-bikes.

A great feature is the USB charging port you can use to charge your smartphone or other electronic accessory. The Blix Sol Eclipse is a quality bike at a budget-friendly price, so if you’re looking for a simple e-bike that is easy to ride and will provide you tons of fun, then you should consider this as your next e-bike.

Blix sells and ships their bikes directly to consumers. Some final assembly is required after the bike is delivered to you. They offer assistance with in-home assembly.

Pro’s

  • Great for easy, leisurely rides – you’ll want to ride this e-bike a lot!
  • RetroShift makes it easy to change gears.
  • Good gear range with the 14-28T cassette and 48T chainring.
  • Powerful 750w motor, great hill climber.
  • Quality components, competitively price
  • Comfortable seat ergonomics during our 100-plus mile series of test rides.
  • Stylish looking beach cruiser, available in 4 colors.

Con’s

  • Throttle still active at PAS 1, safer to have auto shut off.
  • PAS 1 and 2 are underpowered, mostly used PAS 3 – 5.

Aventon Pace 500 Step-Through

Seniors looking for a casual cruising bike that packs power will like this e-bike. With its upright cruiser frame, this Class 3 (throttle and PAS up to 28 mph) e-bike offers a good balance of comfort and power. The 500w motor dishes out power when you need it, and the 48-volt 12.8-amp hour battery will take you up to 60 miles.

The Pace 500 ST’s 500-watt rear hub motor, 5-level pedal assist system and throttle offer a great mix of cruising speed and acceleration – when you need it. We never felt like the bike wanted to storm ahead and shake us out of our seats – something less experienced riders will definitely like. The Zoom hydraulic disc brake system

The upright positioning and nimble handling made this bike feel more like a city commuter as we maneuvered around sharp corners and obstacles. The Shimano Acera 8-speed makes pedaling pretty pleasant in every gear. Stylish but simple looking, the Pace 500 ST has two frame sizes – medium and large, in four available colors.

Rolling this 53 lbs lightweight down the road on 27.5” x 2.2” Kenda multi-purpose tires, stopping is managed with the help of Tektro hydraulic disc brakes, which automatically shut of the motor when in use. Also keeping you safe are the integrated headlight and taillight.

This e-bike satisfies the needs of most senior riders with its reliable performance, good design and a comfortable ride. Whether you’re an experienced rider looking for something more casual, or someone getting back into riding after a long hiatus, we think you will have fun riding this e-bike. Aventon has dealers throughout the US and also ships bikes to buyer’s homes. Some assembly is required.

Pro’s

  • Powerful 500w motor engages smoothly with the rider’s pedaling
  • Upgraded 12.8 Ah battery can take you up to 65 miles on a single charge.
  • Great ergonomics providing a comfortable ride.
  • Adjustable stem makes sizing a snap for different size riders.
  • Zoom hydraulic brakes provide safe stopping power.
  • Shimano Acera 8-speed gives good range with no ghost pedaling.
  • Rear rack can carry 55 lbs of cargo.

Con’s

  • Pedaling in turns might cause the pedal to scrape the ground, due to the low bottom bracket and 170mm long crank.
  • Suspension forks and seat post would be nice to round out rider comfort.

Lectric XP 3.0 ST

Lectric’s XP 3.0 is a great e-bike for seniors due to it’s comfort, stability, and value, But it also has a feature most other e-bikes don’t have – it’s a folding e-bike. The folding frame is convenient for storing, whether it be an RV, car trunk or small apartment, and is convenient to transport, which is great for seniors who want to take their e-bike when they travel. This e-bike has a simple design, is easy to ride, and very affordable.

The XP 3.0 is a Class 2 e-bike, which means the throttle and pedal assist system (PAS) will help this bike reach a top speed of 20 mph. It’s a little heavy for its size at 64 lbs, but it can carry 150 lbs of cargo on its rear rack, which means you can carry a passenger larger than a small child. The overall capacity for this e-bike is 330 lbs.

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The 500-watt motor has more than enough power to move this bike, and the 48-volt, 10.4 amp-hour battery offers a range of up to 45 miles on a single charge. Rolling on 20” x 3” all-terrain tires, the short wheel base and low profile provides good handling and good overall control. This e-bike can accommodate rider heights from 4’10 to 6’1.”

This e-bike is well-suited for senior riders in its ease at shifting, thanks to the Shimano Tourney 7-speed shifter, and the easy pedaling provided by the efficient gear range. With this being a more affordable ebike, the XP 3.0 uses mechanical brakes that stop almost as well as hydraulic brakes. One of the benefits of having less expensive brakes is the lower cost in fixing and replacing them as well.

Considering all the options that come on this bike, such as folding frame, good power and range, and cargo capacity, the XP 3.0 is competitively priced. Selling for under 1400, this is the most affordable e-bike on our Seniors list.

Pro’s

  • Great hill climbing from the 500.2w motor’s peak output of 1000w and 55Nm of torque.
  • Gearing range from the 11-28T cassette is in balance with motor engagement and no awkward pedaling.
  • 180mm rotors and mechanical brakes stop superb, while keeping costs down.
  • Coil spring fork, with 50mm travel, absorbs bumps well.
  • Rear rack has 150-lb capacity, accommodates a child passenger heavier than the 55 lb average on other e-bikes.

Con’s

  • Can’t remove the battery key when riding, which increases the risk of losing the key when parked.

Rad Power Bikes RadTrike

Rad Power Bikes’ new RadTrike made our list of Best e-Bike for Seniors because it is the most stable and well constructed trike that’s available at an affordable price. Also consider Rad has been around since 2007, is an authority in e-bike manufacturing and is one of the leading e-bike distributors in the U.S., and you can see why we picked their e-trike for our list.

The RadTrike’s load capacity is 415 lbs, which includes 325 lbs for the rider, 60 lbs for the rear rack, and 30 lbs on the front rack. The frame dimensions can hit a wide variety of rider heights, with its low 13.4” bottom tube, 28″ – 35.4″ seat height, and 18.1″ handlebar reach riders as short as 4 ’10” to as tall as 6′ 4″ can adjust the Trike to accommodate their size.

RadTrike is designed to be stable and allow the rider to be in control at all times. Its maximum speed is capped at 14 mph. The 750-watt front hub motor climbs hills exceptionally well. The pedal assist system (PAS) has five levels, 1 – 5, and comes with a throttle when you need quick bursts of power when starting from a stop.

The 10 amp-hour battery can take you up to 50 miles between charges. The drive train consists of one single 16T gear rear axle and only distributes power to the right wheel. The left wheel spins freely. That allows for both rear wheels to spin at the speed they need to spin at to make safe turns. Trikes that had mid-drive or rear hub motors make both rear wheels spin at the same speed, which can make the bike tip over or crash.

Stopping is provided by the reverse pedal activated coaster brake on the rear wheels, and the front mechanical disc brake. The Trikecan folded and transported in the back of most SUVs. The strong steel frame gives it a total weight of 82 lbs, which means for most, lifting the RadTrike. is a two-person task.

Rad has a good shipping and customer service history as a direct-to-consumer seller. They can ship your RadTrike to your home or mailing address, with only minimal assembly required. If you aren’t sure you can do the necessary finishing work to make your RadTrike. road ready, then be sure to find someone local who will either come to your house to complete, or have the RadTrike. delivered to a shop that will do the work. Rad offers buyers a 14-day trial, so you can make sure this e-bike is for you. Purchase includes a limited 1-year warranty.

Pro’s

  • One of the most affordable, quality electric trikes on the market.
  • Designed with safety in mind, capping top speed at 14 mph.
  • Unique free wheel design makes this trike handle better and much safer in turns.
  • Great ergonomics: seat, back rest, grips, handlebar reach, leg extension to the pedals – all designed for max comfort.
  • Powerful 750w motor overtook every hill we needed to climb.
  • Depending on your speed and reliance on the motor, range is between 25-59 miles.
  • Size convenient for getting through doorways and storing at home or in car.
  • Folding design makes it easier to transport and store when not using

Con’s

  • This trike deserves a torque sensor to better manage motor engagement with the pedaling, and efficiently manage battery use.

Specialized Turbo Como 3.0

The Specialized Turbo Como IGH 3.0 is among the best as a high quality top performing commuter e-bike. With its comfortable geometry, sleek and stylish design, and lightweight aluminum frame, this e-bike is perfect for the senior rider looking for a bike that needs less maintenance and can better withstand outdoor conditions.

Propelling this Como 3.0 is the Specialized proprietary Rx Street Tune 250-watt mid-drive motor. With its smooth, silent running, free of vibrations, this throttle-less Class 3 motor has a pedal assist system (PAS) that will take you to a top speed of 28 mph. Rather than using a cassette and derailleur like most bikes, Specialized uses the Enviolo CVP Multi-Turn internal gear hub [IGH], which provides smooth, trouble-free shifting.

Powering the motor is the 10.4 amp-hour battery, frame integrated and removable for re-charging and storage.

The 2.2-inch LCD display has a USB port for you to recharge your smartphone. The 27.5” x 2.3” Pathfinder Sport Reflect tires handle great and keep you in control. You can use this e-bike for commuting and for cargo. Front and rear cargo baskets can enable you to carry up 75 lbs (30 lbs front, 45 lbs rear) for a total of 275 lbs.

The Specialized Como 3.0 IGH is like the Cadillac of commuter e-bikes for seniors. That means the quality build and components are reflected in the total price. But you know you’re getting a high quality e-bike when you buy from them, which says a lot about the overall value.

Pro’s

  • High quality design, build and components from a top bike company.
  • 250w proprietary mid-drive motor produces great power, and 50Nm of torque while economizing on energy.
  • Ergonomically designed for ride comfort will keep you on the seat longer than you thought.
  • Custom frame-integrated 48v, 10.4Ah battery will take you up to 90 miles on a single charge.
  • High quality gearing with internal gear hub to withstand elements, no greasy sprocket
  • Awesome stopping power with the Shimano BR-MT200, hydraulic disc brakes, 180mm front and 160mm rear rotors.
  • Built-in lift handle for easy maneuvering.

Con’s

  • High quality comes at a price, the price on this e-bike is around 3400.
  • Most American riders will encounter a learning curve when first riding on the internal gear hub.

Blix Packa Genie

The Blix Pack Genie e-bike is a one-of-a-kind, built to carry cargo like no other cargo e-bike we’ve tested, which is why it’s on our list of Best e-bikes for Seniors. The stability and control this bike offers is surprising when considering its size. The rear cargo capacity allows you to carry 150 lbs, which could be groceries and a grandchild – amazing!

The step-through frame and 23“ height between the ground and step-over point makes it easy to climb on and off the bike (if you need a boost up, there are inexpensive folding step stools you can use and carry on one of the racks). Riders ranging in height from 5’1” to 6’3” will find they fit this cargo bike very well.

You get a lot of power from the 750-watt rear hub, which really matters when you’re carrying the extra passenger or cargo. Energy for the motor comes from the 48-volt, 12.8 amp-hour battery.

Stopping ability is provided by the Bengal hydraulic disk brakes. Changing gears is through the Shimano Acera 7-speed, making pedaling easier and the ride more fun. The 24” x 2.4” puncture-resistant tires cushion you from the bumps and rough parts of the road. This bike can take a 250 lbs rider weight, and its total weight is 75 lbs.

But aside from that, the Blix Packa Genie really offers a lot of value for your money, especially when you consider the basic one-battery e-bike which sells for under 2000.

Pro’s

  • Good quality, value-priced e-cargo bike that lets you carry up to 400 lbs (up to 200 lbs of cargo)
  • Great handling for an e-cargo bike. Riding around I easily forgot that the bike is 81” long
  • Lots of accessories, making it easy to load the bike up with cargo and/or kids
  • Very long range with dual battery setup (up to nearly 80 miles in our real-world range test)
  • Powerful climbing hills, even when loaded up with weight
  • Good, quality components (hydraulic disc brakes, Shimano drivetrain)
  • Easy to get on/off thanks to 24” wheels and low, 19.4” step-over frame

Con’s

  • This is me being super nit-picky, but I’d like to see a slightly larger front chainring. On PAS 5 you really don’t have to pedal much at all to get the bike cruising at 20 MPH.
  • You can do so much with this bike, and there are a ton of accessories already. I just want more – specifically some type of large cargo basket for the rear rack.

Denago Commute Model 1 ST

Denago Commute Model 1 ST makes our list of best step-through e-bikes for seniors based on its user-friendly acceleration, riding comfort, and overall value. The Shengyi 500w motor makes this a Class 3 e-bike (throttle and PAS limited at 28 mph). The motor is calibrated to give the senior rider a happy medium with its tempered acceleration. This bike will make you feel like you’re in control at all times.

Power to the motor comes from the 48v 13.6 Ah battery which will take you up to 45 miles between charges. Using the Microshift 8-speed, this bike has a gearing setup that is senior-friendly, providing gear options that work with your pedaling efforts and the road conditions. Whether you’re going uphill, or using PAS 5 on a straight away, this e-bike won’t leave you feeling under-powered or out of control.

The Commute is 66 lbs, a little heavier than similar style e-bikes, but the Zoom hydraulic disc brakes work well bringing it to a stop. The Zoom suspension seatpost and suspension forks do a good job absorbing the bumps. Riding atop 27.5” x 2.6” puncture resistant tires gives you positive traction and good overall handling in pavement, gravel and dirt roads.

Denago has priced the Commuter 1 for under 2000. When looking at the quality components and overall design, this bike has a lot of value with its price. Taking into account its stability, comfort and reliability, it is also a good e-bike option for seniors.

Pro’s

  • Good mid and top end power from 500.2w Shengyi hub motor Class 3 (PAS limit 28 mph).
  • 48-volt, 13.6Ah integrated battery has a low-key look and provided 27 Mi. of range in PAS 5.
  • 8-speed gearing great for top speed and climbing hills.
  • Good traction from 27.5 x 2.6-in.-wide tires.
  • Frame size and reach well-suited for taller riders, too.
  • Theft protection provided by PIN lock.

Con’s

Rad Power Bikes – RadRunner 3 Plus

Whether you’re a senior looking for an alternative to your car, a good small cargo bike or an electric bike that will seat another person, the RadRunner 3 Plus, from Rad Power Bikes, could be the e-bike you’re looking for. This Class 2 e-bike features a well thought out frame design and a powerful 750-watt motor that will power you and your goodies all around town.

The RadRunner 3 Plus has a newly designed frame with a hauling capacity of 350 lbs. There is tons of versatility with what you can carry when using the optional rear passenger seat, front and rear racks with plenty of optional accessories, and an optional trailer.

The 750-watt motor is also newly designed and really wowed us with its performance. Distributing power from the bike chain is the 7-speed Shimano Altus shifter/derailleur, which worked well with the motor when pedaling in low gears, on hills, and flat straightaways. This bike has a right grip twist throttle. Providing greater safety and sure-footed stopping power is the upgraded hydraulic brake system. The brakes worked well for us when carrying cargo.

Considering all the features on the RadRunner 3 Plus, you definitely get a great bang for your e-bike buck. To learn more about this e-bike, or for information on price and availability, please click the link below.

Pro’s

  • Thanks to its weight capacity, frame style, and 350-lb weight capacity, the RadRunner 3 Plus is hugely versatile e-bike.
  • Tons of optional accessories, like additional seats, lockable hard-shell panniers, and even the new Rad Trailer, allow the bike to carry kids and pets, or haul just about anything.
  • With a cargo rack significantly longer than previous models, the RadRunner 3 Plus has plenty of room for passengers or gear.
  • Compared to earlier models, the bike’s frame is stronger and more maneuverable, while still accommodating riders between 4′-10″ and 6′-2″.
  • The RadRunner 3 Plus feels great and handles well thanks to its improved motor, 3.3″ tires, and BMX-style handlebars.
  • The bike’s PAS system offers a wide range of assistance levels to match the preferences of a wider range of riders.
  • Comfort is at the forefront, with the bike’s upright positioning, improved saddle, suspension fork with 60mm of travel, and 17″ standover height.
  • Currently in development, a second battery will be available soon to double the RadRunner 3 Plus’ range!
  • The bike’s updated frame design and semi-integrated battery are welcome sights that also look great!

Con’s

  • We love the overall visual redesign, but still wish the bike had better cable management and came in more than just one color – but these things are pretty minor when considering all of the Pros!
  • The single-leg kickstand is a bit of a downgrade from previous models that used a dual-leg one. This version is easier to use, but isn’t quite as effective when loading cargo.

Electric Bike Company Model S

The Model S, from the Electric Bike Company, is great for seniors, combining a classic look with quality components on a bike virtually anyone can ride. Its welded rear rack, with a 55 lbs capacity, is great for carrying groceries, picnic goodies, and even a bike seat for the grandchild. Add an optional front rack, and you can carry another 45 lbs of fun.

Powering you along with goodies at hand is a powerful 500-watt motor, claimed to be the best e-bike motor in the world. It has a 10-year warranty, which is the best in the industry, and gives the buyer greater value. The 12 amp-hour battery can provide enough energy for 60 miles of riding in between charges.

Designed to offer great ergonomics for comfortable posture, the 27” wide handlebars are easy to reach. The super comfy seat is great for longer rides, and the 7-speed shifting and pedal assist adjustments on the LCD display safely control your speed. The aluminum frame will accommodate a rider height range of 5’2” to 6’ 10” and the total weight capacity is 420 lbs, making this bike very inviting to almost anyone.

Optional anti-theft alarm is available, as well as numerous accessories, including a suspension seat post for smoother rides, and a variety of cargo carrying items. The Electric Bike Company sells directly to consumers, which means this bike arrives fully built, making it convenient for seniors who aren’t comfortable using tools.

All in all, you get a lot of value with this superbly built e-bike.

Pro’s

  • 10-year warranty on motor – great value.
  • Great riding control and stability for new and returning riders.
  • Smooth, reliable power from the 500w motor.
  • Impressive 65 mile range from the 48v 18Ah battery.
  • Color LCD display was easy to see while riding, giving pertinent details.
  • Good stopping power from Tektro Dorado hydraulic disc brakes.
  • Weight capacity 420 lbs, welcomes most riders, regardless of weight.
  • Optional suspension seat post smooths the bumps, and many accessories for customizing rider needs.

Con’s

  • We would like to see an optional suspension fork for smoother rides.
  • High priced bike (but it does feature high quality components.)

Evelo Galaxy SL

Senior riders who are more active and who want an e-bike with innovative features will really like the Evelo Galaxy SL. Featuring its state of the art Enviolo gear hub and 500-watt Dapu mid-drive motor, the Galaxy comes packaged with nifty components that provide unique riding experiences and add value to your purchase.

The Enviolo continuously variable transmission (CVT) is a new take on the old internal gear hub that you see on Dutch bikes. With a manual twist shifter, you can change gears when you’re not moving and the unit needs very little maintenance throughout the life of the bike.

The Dapu 500-watt mid-drive motor is of higher quality than most motors you see elsewhere, and it complements your pedaling, rather than replacing it. When climbing hills you will appreciate the 95 Newton-meters of torque it generates – something mid-drive motors are known for. This e-bike comes with a throttle and is chain-driven.

The rear rack-mounted 36V, 13Ah battery allows for the shorter step-through frame, and is super easy to remove for charging and security. The battery should last for 50 miles between charges, depending on your shifting and pedaling.

The SL has rigid suspension, which helps keep the weight down, and the Zoom hydraulic brakes provide good stopping power. Complementing the shorter frame height are the 24” x 2.4” wheels, providing good traction and handling on pavement and gravel roads. The 350 lbs capacity allows you to take advantage of the cargo-carrying accessories that are available. But if you just want to ride this e-bike as is, then you will appreciate its light 52-lb weight.

So, in conclusion, the Evelo Galaxy SL is a unique e-bike more suited to active senior riders. But the technological features can help elevate your riding experiences to new levels. Evelo sells and ships e-bikes directly to consumers, and their bikes are delivered with some final assembly required. Shipping is included in the price of the bike, and they offer a 21-day at home trial offer, allowing you to make sure this is the e-bike for you.

Pro’s

  • Enviolo’s continuously variable planetary transmission provides effortless gear changes and low maintenance.
  • Peppy 500-watt mid-drive motor still provides a traditional riding experience.
  • Low step-over makes it easy to hop on.
  • Lightweight build, easy to maneuver, transport and store.
  • Quality components give added value, especially Evelo’s 4-year, 20K mile warranty.
  • Smooth, predictable motor engagement with pedaling, enables safe speed selections.
  • Classic styling harkins to an earlier era of bicycling, but with modern amenities.

Con’s

  • expensive, but you’re getting a higher quality electric bike.
  • Riders unfamiliar with CVT gear hubs may face a learning curve; plus upshifting is difficult in the first 500 miles.

Summary: Electric Bikes Keep Seniors Active, Happy And Healthy

I’ve spent most of my life riding bicycles, and I like knowing that electric bikes are there to keep me riding no matter my age.

E-bikes are sometimes called the great equalizer of cycling. Cycling, as a sport and a mode of transportation, was formerly reserved for the (relatively) young and fit; those unfazed by hills and long durations of physical exertion. But e-bikes, thanks to their small motor and battery, make it so that anyone — no matter their age, fitness level or ability — can enjoy going for a bike ride. E-bikes make hills feel flatter, accelerations easier and give riders the power to choose exactly how much they want to ask of their bodies when riding a bike.

I like to think of it as the democratization of bikes.

Few demographics have been more impacted by e-bikes than the older generations of riders. Not only do they give existing cyclists the power to continue riding at any age, it’s helping people who haven’t ridden a bike in years rediscover the sport. They’re less intimidating, more forgiving and can give you the sensation of turning back the clock to a version of you that used to do laps around the neighborhood on a one-speed bicycle.

We’ve spent hours testing with many of the bikes on this list, testing their braking, handling and acceleration to demonstrate how they handle in the real world. So if you’re a senior on the hunt for an e-bike, you’ve come to the right place.

Now you’ve seen all our picks for the best electric bike for seniors in 2023. Are there others you think should make the list? Let us know down in the Комментарии и мнения владельцев section below!

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One crappy bike after another. If your goal is to get a bike that breaks down then by all means, buy one of these. If your goal is to get a bike that lurches when you start to pedal, get one of these. If you want a super unstable trike that wants to tip over in turns, get the one they list here. If your goal is a reliable, safe and easy to ride, then go to your local IBD that sells quality bikes and listen to their recommendations. This list represents nothing more than paid advertising. Look elsewhere for advice

Nope, several solid and better bikes were left out including the fact that none of the Gazelle bikes were listed all of which are better made and will last longer than any of these bikes.

Unfortunately, Gazelle does not make an e-bike that will better accommodate a petite person. Petite people are not necessarily lightweight people but those of us less than 62 inches tall have trouble with Gazelle e-bikes. My good friends have two Gazelle e-bikes and let me ride from time to time – while I love the experience overall, it’s frightening when I have to immediately stop or dismount. I’m too far up off the ground. Because of the quality of the Gazelle e-bikes is outstanding, I keep communicating with them about creating a customized version with 20 inch wheels and/or a compact frame. Gazelle bikes, in every other aspect, are my favorite. The only reason I have not purchased, as I get older (yes, I am a senior), the higher bikes are more daunting.

I could not miss that you did not mention your qualifications and were completely negative in your Комментарии и мнения владельцев while providing a solution of your own. When I followed the link attached to your name it took me to Freedom Folding Bikes. I submit Sir that your motives are not in the best interests of the target audience of this article. I am a senior who purchased an ebike for several reasons not the least of which is my reduced capacity to ride a traditional bike. I found the article well written and with seniors in mind. Every potential purchaser has their own criteria that needs to be met. My advice to those investigating is to talk with people who have purchased an ebike, take some out for a test ride, and to remember that only you can decide if it is right for you.

Bryan ……. I’m a 79 senior. Riding a Pedego Stretch (cargo bike) for almost 6 years with over 10k miles. Your Комментарии и мнения владельцев regarding hands on consideration and test and trial of what’s good way to decide on an e-bike are very good. Especially for seniors, who may be less interested in being their own mechanic than younger generations, finding a dealer nearby with a track record of service and being in business for a while is especially important. Also, consider that with e-bike assist, some added weight is not particularly a burden. Especially with regard to wheels and tires, because skinner tires and rough trails or streets potential for flats are something that seniors want to stay away from. Invest time in shopping and talking to experience will pay off. Being on 2 wheels is so much liberation and fun for seniors …….

And the price point on the Freedom Folding bikes is substantially higher than those in scope for this article, too. Another important point about the critical comment.

I don’t know anything about freedom bikes but cost per mile is more important to most seniors than initial price.

Couldn’t agree more. Seniors want low/no maintenance. A lot of seniors have an above average budget to spend. You only have one belt drive bike on your list. Where are the Reise Muller and Gazelle e-bikes that feature belt drives and internal gear hubs for maintenance free riding?

Agreed, lifetime costs, cost per mile and no grief are the most important factor. I have a Gazelle with 4k miles in 18 months and zero issues. From the Schwalbe Marathon tires that have never had a flat to the Bosch drive system everything is built to last.

At just 68 years old I have found my Radcity to be very reliable, safe, and easy to ride. Extremely smooth and quiet-VERY relaxing to ride.

In my case one of the most important decisions for seniors like myself when considering an e-bike is “WEIGHT”. It affects all aspects of riding and also transporting. I’ve been riding e-bikes since 2013 and I could not recommend any bike that approaches 60 pounds to a senior.

David, likewise. I’m a 50 year cyclist; road, mountain, folding (Brompton) and now e-bike (Pedego Stretch). Pedego offers many model options. The nationwide independent dealer network is especially important, unless one has the ability, tools and a lack of arthritic joints to be a bicycle mechanic. As we age, good dealer service is increasingly important consideration.

As a 69 year old senior that migrated to an e-bike two years ago due to health reasons, I find that one key item is not addressed in your recommendations. The weight of e-bikes is a significant factor to understand when buying a bike. While I understand not everyone has a need to transport their e-bike on their vehicle, those that do need to understand the following: If you want to transport your bike on a car rack, you have be strong enough to lift it up onto the rack and take it off. (with or without your battery installed). You also have to have a car bike rack made to handle the weight of e-bikes. The only e-bike rated car racks I have seen require a car hitch, so that might limit your ability to have a bike rack if you do not have a hitch on your vehicle. You analysis and recommendations should include the weight of the e-bike.

Hi Gary! Saris makes an electric bike rack for ebikes! Check out: https://www.saris.com/product/door-county

I am 78 and ride a recumbent trike with a super pedestrian wheel on the hills of upstate New York. Excellent for seniors. Did you consider recumbent trikes in your research?

Don a great comment. Not only are recumbents more comfortable to ride, but much more attractive than the bikes in this article.

I am 85 and have been riding a three wheel Bionx assist recumbent for the past five years. My wife and I switched to recumbent trikes after crashing our mountain bikes three times each while touting on the GAP with panniers. I tried switching back to an ebike about a year ago and found them to be heaver than my trike and very short front to back. I felt very cramped and unstable.

I’m a 69 yr. Old senior with hip and knee issues. I bought a Aventon Aventure Step Thru. Other than its a little heavy as expected ,its great, especially on hills. My area is not very bike friendly, riding on the road mostly. One of my rides I can ride approx. 12 miles in 40 minutes with approx 30% hills, that’s riding on level 3 of 5. Need to work my way up to lower levels, less power, better workout,when. I want. I rode the same area. shorter rides,20 yrs ago on a Mtn bike. So much easier and more fun on ebike at almost 70 vs 50. My backside is the most limiting factor. Looking at new seat,maybe suspension seat post and tougher backside.

The saddle is crucial! It doesn’t have to be expensive. A suspension seat post is a real bonus. Again, it doesn’t have to be expensive. You appear to be my age with the same problems. I built my own bike as there is nothing on the market with the features I want. (That I can afford).

Thanks for a nice report. Some of the negative Комментарии и мнения владельцев by readers are not true. I recommend that a customer test ride 3 different types of E-Bikes from 3 manufacturers before they buy a bike.

I’m 69 with some hip and knee issues riding a Aventon Aventure. I’m new to ebikes. 20 yrs ago I rode a Mtn bike. No hip or knee issues then. The ebike is much easier to ride and I can ride much further. Ebike is a lifesaver on hills or when my knee is hurting. My backside is my limit so far doesn’t last as long as the battery. The bike is a bit heavy. But I’m also a big man. 6 ft 1″, 255 lbs.

Out of all of these, the RadCity is my favourite. I suppose I am a Senior now – no escaping the fact. I wanted a bike with the things that were important to me. It had to have: Central battery,low step frame, disc brakes, hub gears, hub motor, steering stabiliser, proper centre stand, proper luggage racks, suspension forks and suspension seat post. I almost achieved what I wanted by building my own for about £800, but the frame was the limiting factor. Out of all these bikes for review, you can cross-off anything with the battery hanging off the back, central motor or fat tyres. The trike I’m not sure of, but I may have to have one in the future – who knows? I will be honest and admit I have ordered a Rad Runner as it has most of the things I/we wanted, although I’m not keen on the tyres. It is supposed to be for my wife. Time will tell.

Its true the RAD City is a well made and excellent bike. I was 81 when I rode my purchase bike 29 Miles total and fell standing still in my garage at 29 Miles dismounting. Determined bike was too heavy and sold it. I broke 3 ribs and had rehab for 3 months. I still ride a 1999 Curie kit at the beach 24V 600W MAC Chain rear Drive with 12,000 miles. The stock Kollmorgen lasted 8k miles before Hurricane rise of 5 ft in my garage where bike was hanging. Blew the controller with an audible Pop. My experience before the 90s was a kit from Mobility Co in NJ Mounted over front tire. Was friction setup with 12v tractor battery between your legs. Starter Motor with a bench Grinder disk mounted to the shaft. The mechanics was a break lever that went thru a block and tackle arrangement under the fiberglass housing which had a standard old starter switch that started the motor on contact with tire. It worked if adjusted correctly and your were moving else you grinder a hole in the tire! It was called Pedal Power Kit. From a company that pioneered Mobility Handicap Scooters in Swell NJ. Frank Flowers was the designer. For 99 it came with kit wires and battery with charger 1979. Ive narrows my new bike down to 2 Blix models. Both Step thru The Food up and Beach Cruiser light weight step thru. That’s my experience of many years peddling with Power. Bob

I was shocked that you did not list one recumbent or one trike with a body. All of the bikes listed were ugly. We older folks are still interested in riding an attractive vehicle.

Don a great comment. Not only are recumbents more comfortable to ride, but much more attractive than the bikes in this article.

Hi I’m a senior in my middle 70” always enjoyed bicycles, hiking. I have been shopping for a Trike. EBR Court give the Raleigh Tristarie IE the Izip Tristar Plus a High Rating. It was a few years ago. The price on this Trikes is 3000. The Evelo Compass Trike is at present time 4,299.00 Oct. 2021 Worth ones time, to check them out. All are good quality. Take Care Carmen

  • Griffin Hales says October 11, 2021 at 5:02 pm

Thanks Carmen! We did take a look at the Compass earlier this year and enjoyed it. https://electricbikereport.com/evelo-compass-review/

I didnt get to see this article when it came out much earlier, but found it today and gave it a read. SOrry, but Chucks initial reply rings true to my own experiences dealing with older customers who still want to ride. Reliability is a HUGE factor when choosing a bike. When a bike breaks down for most people its just an inconvenience, but when that bike is a mobility device, a break down can turn a fun afternoon into a survival problem. Weight is another. I laughed when I saw the 70 pound aventure on the list! This is NOT a bike for seniors. Choose wisely from an actual bike shop and not from review shills on a website, and god forbid you pick ANYTHING from amazon! I’ve also found out that 2000 seems to be the price point to having a repaired often bike to a reliable AND supported one.

I just turned 60 and my wife and I have owned our eBikes since early 2019. We love it! We test rode several brands before we landed on the RadCity 5. No complaints. As to reliability, I’ve got over 700 miles on it and it’s going strong. It just works. No need for service yet. It’s well built and has decent components. Check the reviews… they are solid and have thousands of satisfied customers. And an amazing value at under 2K. The only negative is that it is a bit heavy. Not an issue for me but could be a bit much to handle for a smaller or older person. The big bike manufacturers (Giant, Trek, Specialized, etc.) have eBike models as well. Even Harley Davidson has entered the eBike foray (check out Serial1.com). I’m sure they are great (integrated batteries, high quality components, sleeker look more like a traditional bike, etc.) but you are well over 3K with this option. If money is no option, then check them out but I’m sure any of the options listed here will serve you well. I recommend that you test drive as many models within your price range, talk to owners/check the reviews, and go for it… you won’t regret it!

I am the 88 year old founder and President of North Bay Elder Ebikers in northern San Francisco Bay and my overall assessment of your list is that it is geared more for your advertisers and general readers than for potential older eBike riders. In a nutshell, they should want to buy the best quality bike they can afford from the closest eBike store that has a full service operation run by knowledgeable people. Also, I don’t believe value should be an issue if one plans to go down any hills, off road or in traffic. Ease of access and operation, proper fit, quality components, stability and, above all, safety should be their main concerns. In my opinion, any list for older riders that leaves off the Gazelle and Riese Muller step through eBikes is, at best, incomplete.

I own a Rad rover step, through I have almost 1900 miles on it and love it. I am 79 yrs young ride almost daily. I have added a brooks saddle and double actuated brakes.

I have not read anything about hand comfort for those of us with arthritis in our hands. Squeezing a hand brake after an hour or so becomes painful. Same with a thumb throttle. The throttle twist is better, but not ideal either. I would love to have coast brakes where I don’t have to use my hands at all. I am a small 71 yr. old woman. Do not want to give up bike riding, dang it.

I’m sure it’s possible to fit a rear wheel with a coaster brake to a bike with a front motor or even a mid-motor. Would that solve your problem? (Partially).

Make sure you check bikes with hydraulic brakes before trying to get someone to install a coaster brake, which would be an unsafe option, especially for the typical heavy ebike.

TOWNIE GO by Electra bikes. I am a senior and have 3500 mile on my Townie. This bike has the FLAT FOOT design with the pedals moved about 6 inches forward is extremely comfortable and easier to control. I commute about 6 miles roundtrip on most nice days and have enjoyed this bike. It has a Bosch mid engine and is fine for the hills in our city. I believe Trek bought this company to be able to use the patented design. The bike has been durable and held up well.

You identify the Ride-1-UP 500 Series (which I ride), but a number of the Комментарии и мнения владельцев you give are about the Core 5. Which model are you really trying to describe and recommend for (us) seniors?

  • Griffin Hales says April 6, 2022 at 10:17 am

Thanks for the catch, Lou. We updated our recommendation from the Core-5 to the 500 series. Looks like the page had an error when updating.

For those whose ability to lift and/or carry heavy loads, weight of the bike is everything. I’m a woman aged 62, and I’ve had my Electric Bike Company Model S for 2 years. It’s lovely–the envy of all the neighbors (that custom paint is gorgeous!)–but it has become too big and heavy. When I purchased it, the weight wasn’t that big an issue (I was 60 at the time). But now I’m older (and an inch shorter!), and I do lift weights, but apparently it’s not enough for me to handle this bike. At 63 pounds in weight (including the basket and battery), it’s just too heavy to handle when I stop to cross at an intersection, for example. At this point, I’m afraid to ride it. I will try to sell it and get something lighter so I can ride without worrying if it’ll tip over and hurt me. Before you choose a bike, TAKE IT FOR A TEST RIDE. See if it’s too heavy, because you’re only going to get older (and likely: weaker) as you age. If you want to ride it for a couple of years, make sure it’s easy to handle now.

It was a great article, thanks for covering such a great piece of information about the best electric bikes for seniors.

Still riding Bionx since 2010. Since 2013 I have accrued over 30,000 miles On both bikes. My PL350 motors no problem. My Cruiser is a Townie 26″Schawble Marathon e-bike tires.21 Spd. Bike. Equipped with front shock forks, suspension seat post, Textro Rear Mag. Brake Lever,11.5 Amp 48 V. Battery. Range 45 miles. My Other Bike is a KHS 700cc Schawble Marathon e-bike tires Touring Bike PL350 Freewheel Motor Equipped with front shock forks, suspension seat post, Textro Rear Mag. Brake Lever,8.5 Amp 48 V. Battery. Range 45 miles. Both Bike batteries have been Rebuilt by Jhonathan Nethers. BionX Has Regenerative Braking and Regen Charging at 10 MPH.

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Best Electric Tricycles for Adults

Electric tricycles for adults are becoming increasingly popular as the world moves toward more sustainable modes of transport.

These machines can easily replace a car for short to medium-distance journeys and are an excellent alternative to standard e-bikes as they offer more stability, comfort, and carrying capacity.

Riders with limited mobility or impaired balance and those who aren’t confident on two wheels will appreciate the benefits of e-trikes.

With their rising popularity, there are now many adult electric trikes to choose from, so we’ve reviewed seven of the best models for 2023 and finished with a short guide to help you choose the perfect one for your needs and budget.

Lectric XP Trike

  • Motor: 500W hub, 65Nm
  • Battery: 672Wh, 48V
  • Gears: Single-speed
  • Brakes: Hydraulic discs
  • Features: Differential wheel axle, rear-wheel drive, lightweight, folding frame, 415lb capacity

The Lectric XP Trike folding electric trike is the cheapest option on this list, coming in at 1,000 below the RadTrike. Of course, the design and componentry won’t be as robust at this price, but affordability and functionality help it stand out.

Firstly, the XP Trike is sold without accessories, but it only costs 149 for the cargo package with front and rear baskets and a front rack, which support 110lb of cargo (3575).

The ride quality is slightly bumpy due to the small-diameter 20″ wheels, narrow 2.6″ tires, and rigid aluminum frame. However, these features keep the weight lower (69.5lb), resulting in a longer range (60 miles) than other electric tricycles for adults.

Lectric designed its tricycle with a dual differential wheel axle, so the wheels spin independently, improving stability while turning. However, unlike similar models, the XP Trike has a hub motor that drives both rear wheels and is the only model on this list with hydraulic disc brakes.

Don’t look past the XP Trike if you want a lightweight adult electric trike and you have a tight budget.

Buzz Cerana T

  • Motor: 350W mid-drive
  • Battery: 374Wh, 36V
  • Gears: 7-speed Shimano Tourney
  • Brakes: Mechanical discs
  • Features: Mid-drive motor, 10-year frame warranty, two baskets included

The Buzz Cerana T three-wheel electric bike is another cheap sub 2,000 option for those on a budget, like the XP Trike.

Unfortunately, this model lacks long-term reviews, but it has an impressive spec for the price, as it is the only mid-drive option on this list. The 350W mid-drive motor provides a superior ride quality that’s smoother and more capable of carrying heavy cargo.

Buzz sells the Cerana T with two baskets pre-installed. The rear rack supports just 40 lb of cargo and can fold down when not being used.

The small 374 Wh battery provides a limited range of 20-40 miles, but the 7-speed drivetrain gives you more options to pedal and extend the battery life compared to the single-speed RadTrike and XP Trike.

Another disappointing feature of this model is there is no backrest on the seat, nor an option to add one, which takes away from the comfort appeal.

All things considered, the Buzz Cerana T is a decent, light-duty choice for those with budget constraints.

Rad Power Bikes RadTrike

  • Motor: 750W hub
  • Battery: 480Wh, 48V
  • Gears: Single-speed
  • Brakes: Front mechanical disc, rear coaster
  • Features: Seat with backrest, 415lb capacity, folding handlebars, reverse mode, parking brake

The Rad Power Bikes RadTrike demonstrates the keen attention to detail that the brand is known for but sits at the higher end of the pricing for e-trikes.

Each design feature and component choice is cleverly thought out, such as the handy reverse mode, adjustable seat and backrest, folding handlebars, and sturdy fenders.

The disappointment of the RadTrike is that you must purchase accessories separately, and realistically, you won’t own it without buying a basket at a minimum. That said, there is a broad selection of accessories and combinations you can choose from, giving you more customizability than other models.

This heavy-duty electric trike has a heavy yet shock-absorbent steel frame which helps make up for the relatively narrow 2.25″ tires; it weighs 82 lb without accessories.

Finally, the single-speed drivetrain reduces maintenance requirements but makes you more reliant on the motor and throttle. You can expect up to 55 miles of range from the RadTrike.

Choose the RadTrike if you want a high-quality, versatile electric tricycle for adults and don’t mind the higher price.

Malisa Electric Trike for Adults

  • Motor: 750W Bafang
  • Battery: 624Wh, 48V
  • Gears: 7-speed Shimano
  • Brakes: Mechanical discs
  • Features: 440lb capacity, two integrated baskets, seat with backrest, fat tires

The Malisa Forte is a high-capacity fat tire electric trike for adults from a small-scale US manufacturer specializing in electric mobility products.

The Forte has a powerful 750W motor with a somewhat dangerous top speed of 26 mph. The 624 Wh battery allows you to travel up to 38 miles using the throttle alone or up to 50 miles with pedal assistance.

The 4″ fat tires give you plenty of grip and shock absorption for riding on bumpy surfaces, but the powerful front hub motor can lose traction on loose surfaces or steep inclines. The mechanical disc brakes are slightly underpowered for such a heavy machine with a high top speed.

best, electric, bikes, seniors, 2023, drive

A weight capacity of 440 lb makes this one of the highest on the market, equivalent to heavy-duty cargo e-bikes. In addition, Malisa includes front and rear baskets with the bike, so it’s ready to be the perfect electric cargo trike straight out of the box.

Overall, this is a solid choice if you want a fast electric trike with a huge payload capacity and don’t mind the extra cost.

Emojo Electric Tricycle for Adults

  • Motor: 500W,
  • Battery: 749Wh, 48V
  • Gears: 7-speed
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc
  • Features: Two integrated baskets, fat tires, cruiser handlebars, seat with backrest

The Emojo Caddy is a fat tire electric trike equipped with baskets and comfort-focused components.

Firstly, you get a seat with a removable and adjustable backrest, a suspension seatpost, wide 4″ fat tires, swept-back handlebars, and a low-step frame. These features make for a smooth ride quality.

The Caddy weighs 90lb but has a low max capacity of 320lb, almost 100lb less than the similarly-priced RadTrike. Power comes from a 500W motor with a max speed of 20mph. This motor pairs with a 749Wh battery but only lasts up to 35 miles because of the inefficient fat tires and high weight.

Many reviewers of this bike complain about the time-consuming and challenging assembly process, so if you’re not a competent home mechanic, you may want to take it to a professional.

Consider the Emojo Caddy if you don’t require a high payload capacity and you want a cruiser-style electric tricycle for adults.

DWMEIGI 750W Adult Electric Trike

  • Motor: Bafang 750W, 80Nm
  • Battery: 874Wh, 48V
  • Gears: 7-speed Shimano
  • Brakes: Tektro MD300 mechanical discs
  • Features: Fast charging, 58L waterproof storage bag included, puncture-resistant fat tires

The DWMEIGI MG1703 is another off-brand three-wheel electric bike with fat tires and a relatively high price.

This e-trike has a powerful Bafang hub motor with 80Nm of torque which can easily handle pulling heavy payloads. A large 874Wh battery can achieve up to 45 miles of range using the throttle only and 60 miles with pedal assistance.

The max capacity is below average, at just 330lb, but DWMEIGI includes front and rear baskets with a waterproof 58L bag for carrying your valuables.

The 4″ wide tires and fork suspension give this model plenty of shock absorption for riding on bumpy roads and light off-road tracks, but the mechanical disc brakes are underpowered for a heavy e-tricycle.

Many users complain about the MG1703’s complicated assembly process, so we recommend having it assembled by a professional if you’re not a competent home mechanic.

All things considered, this model is slightly overpriced compared to the other electric trikes for adults on this list, but it comes fully equipped and has a solid max range.

ADDMOTOR Electric Adult Trike

  • Motor: Bafang 750W
  • Battery: 960Wh, 48V
  • Gears: 7-speed Shimano Altus
  • Brakes: Tektro MD300 mechanical discs
  • Features: 85-mile range, fat tires, 100lb rear basket capacity, seat with backrest

The ADDMOTOR M-360 is the only electric recumbent trike we’ve picked for our list of the best electric tricycles for adults.

best, electric, bikes, seniors, 2023, drive

This model is the ideal tricycle for seniors with disabilities thanks to the laid-back and relaxed ride quality with full support from a powerful electric motor and large battery.

ADDMOTOR chose a padded seat with a backrest and long rider-facing handlebars to put you in the perfect position for a day in the saddle. The 4″ fat tires also help absorb road vibrations and enhance the ride quality.

The M-360’s electronics are impressive, featuring 750W of power that will take you up to 22mph and easily flatten any hills. Unfortunately, most of the bike’s weight is over the rear wheel, meaning the powerful front-wheel drive can cause traction issues, so be careful on steep slopes or loose terrain. The 960Wh battery lasts up to 85 miles on one charge.

As a recumbent trike, the M-360 isn’t compatible with a front basket, but it has a 100lb-capacity rear basket and a 350lb total payload capacity.

Choose the ADDMOTOR M-360 if you want one of the best electric trikes for seniors or those with disabilities, and don’t mind the higher price tag.

Buying Guide for the Best Electric Tricycles for Adults

Electric tricycles for adults are ideal for riders with limited mobility, impaired balance, or who aren’t comfortable navigating busy areas on two wheels. However, the different designs and specs can make deciding tricky. This section will detail the characteristics and features to look out for when choosing an adult electric trike.

Payload Capacity

One of the major draws of an electric tricycle for adults is the ability to haul heavy cargo loads without worrying about stability. The space between the two rear wheels also increases surface area for adding a large basket than can hold your items.

The bikes on our list can support 320lb up to 440lb. However, each rack has its own weight capacity, so it’s important to factor this into your decision. Heavier riders should choose a model with a higher total payload capacity, so they’re not limited when carrying cargo.

If you’re a fan of the best electric cargo bikes for their carrying capacity but want more stability, an e-trike is a better choice.

Comfort Features

Comfort is another universal characteristic of adult electric trikes. Most models come with a comfortable padded seat with a backrest that allows you to sit back and upright in a completely relaxed position.

The small-diameter wheels typically used on e-trikes transfer much more road chatter, so another valuable feature is high-volume tires that can absorb road vibrations.

There is one recumbent model among our list of seven electric adult trikes. This design is incredibly comfortable and even more accessible for riders with limited mobility.

Range

Throttle mode is almost ubiquitous on e-trikes sold in the US. The throttle allows you to start easily from a stopped position and use the tricycle as a mobility device akin to an electric scooter.

The problem with throttle use is that it uses the battery quickly, so if you expect to use the throttle regularly, choose an electric tricycle with a higher max range. Models like the DWMEIGI MG1703 and ADDMOTOR M-360 have high max ranges.

Motor Position and Speed Limit

Most electric tricycle motors are positioned in the front wheel’s hub. However, the Lectric XP Trike uses rear-wheel drive, and the Buzz Cerana T has a mid-drive motor.

The position of the motor in the front wheel and the rear-heavy weight distribution of electric tricycles means it can be hard to get traction on loose surfaces or steep hills, especially if conditions are wet. This effect is compounded for high-power motors such as the 750W hubs used on some of the models on our list.

Another consideration is the speed limit of the tricycle. Brands like Rad Power Bikes and Lectric limit their electric trikes to 14mph to ensure the safety of their riders. Tricycles are unstable when turning at speed, so riding over 20mph can be dangerous. Thankfully, you can usually modify the max speed of your motor through the settings in the display.

We wrote more about this in our hub motors vs. mid-drive motors guide, so consider checking it out if you want to learn more.

Baskets and Extra Accessories

As you’ve seen in our list of the best electric trikes for adults, most of these products come with pre-installed cargo baskets, so you’re ready to run errands when the bike arrives. Some brands even include a waterproof bag or a basket liner.

Rad Power Bikes chose to ship its RadTrike without any accessories, but it has a wider range of purpose-built options to purchase from its online store, allowing greater personalization for different jobs.

FAQ

What Are the Benefits of an Electric Tricycle Compared to a Traditional Bicycle?

An electric tricycle has three distinct benefits over a traditional bike. Firstly, the extra wheel removes the need to balance and worry about stability when it’s loaded with cargo.

E-trikes also have higher load capacities and more space to carry cargo. Lastly, the relaxed ride position and seat with a backrest make riding a tricycle more comfortable than a traditional bike.

Are There Any Legal Requirements for Riding an Electric Tricycle?

Yes, there are legal requirements for riding an e-trike, but there are no additional legal requirements for riding an electric tricycle compared to a standard electric bike. They are subject to the same three-class system and state-by-state regulations that apply.

For example, some states have a minimum age requirement of 16 or 18 years old for riding an e-bike. Read more about this in our E-Bike Classes Guide.

Are There Any Safety Concerns When Riding an Electric Tricycle?

Yes, there is one major safety concern when riding an electric tricycle. The extra wheel creates a much more stable base when riding in a straight line.

However, this makes it unsafe to corner at speed, so you must slow down significantly when taking corners. Otherwise, the outside wheel will lift off the ground, potentially causing you to topple.

How Far Can an Electric Tricycle Go on a Single Charge?

An electric tricycle can go up to 85 miles on a single charge, based on the longest-range model we found, the ADDMOTOR M-360. However, the average range is much lower if you use throttle mode and carry extra cargo.

What Kind of Maintenance Do Electric Tricycles Require?

Electric trikes for adults have similar maintenance requirements to standard electric bikes, such as regular cleaning and lubrication, maintenance of the battery level above 20% (ideally), regular pumping of tires, adjustment of mechanical disc brakes, or bleeding of hydraulic discs.

What Kind of Terrain Can an Electric Tricycle Handle?

Electric tricycles are only suitable for use on pavement or very light gravel or dirt paths without steep gradients or tight turns because they aren’t maneuverable.

In addition, they’re bulky and lack traction due to the irregular weight distribution and placement of the motor. These characteristics do not lend well to off-road riding.

Are Electric Tricycles Suitable for People with Disabilities?

Yes, electric bicycles are suitable for people with some disabilities. For example, those with limited mobility or issues with balance will be able to ride an e-trike thanks to the extra stability and accessible ride position. However, this is highly specific to the disabled individual and their capabilities.

How Can I Choose the Best Electric Tricycle for My Needs?

To choose the best electric trike for adults, consider what you need it for, how long you plan to ride, where you will go, if you want a throttle, and how much weight it needs to be able to support. Pay attention to payload capacity, max range, tire width, motor position, and accessory compatibility.

Lectric XP Trike first ride: Testing the low-cost electric trike made for everyone

Lectric eBikes is know for two things – making affordable e-bikes and making a lot of them. The company’s main goal has been to look at the e-bike market, figure out what people want, and find a way to make it more affordable. They’v’e done it time and again with their other e-bikes and that’s exactly what they’ve done this time with the new Lectric XP Trike.

The company invited me out to see the new e-trike at their headquarters in Phoenix, Arizona. There I had the chance to hop aboard and get a sense of just what this 1,499 electric trike can do.

And the answer, it turns out, is a lot. It can haul. It can climb. It can fold. It’s a three-wheeled Swiss Army knife with a ridiculous amount of torque and seating for one.

I only spent a single day with the capable little trike, and so this isn’t a full review… yet. That’s still to come. But even with only a few hours in the saddle, I can already tell you that this is absolutely going to be a major hit… if they can keep it in stock.

Check out how the Lectric XP Trike performed in my first ride video below. Then keep reading for the nitty gritty details.

Lectric XP First Ride video

The Lectric XP Trike has a 500W motor that puts out 1,092 peak watts of power. It’s mounted in a mid-drive setup as the trike’s jackshaft, giving it the ability to power both of the rear wheels via an open differential axle.

It draws power from a 48V 14Ah battery with 672 Wh of capacity, which is enough for 60 miles (96 km) of range in the lowest power mode on pedal assist. But honestly, even on throttle at the trike’s top speed of 14 mph (22 km/h), you’ll probably still get a solid 30-40 miles (48-64 km).

The bike rolls on 20″ x 2.6″ tires, has a single speed drivetrain, and rocks hydraulic disc brakes on 180 mm discs. The brake levers each have a parking brake, which I’ve never seen before on hydraulic brakes.

The 69.5 lb (31.5 kg) e-bike folds to fit in tight spaces, and that folding trick allows it to arrive in fully-assembled form. You don’t have to bolt anything together, you just unfold it and ride. That’s going to be a major benefit for many riders, especially older ones that don’t want to be bent over a box lifting a 70 pound bike around.

Speaking of weight, it’s actually relatively lightweight for an electric trike. And the low step-through size makes it great for shorter riders down to 4’10” (147 cm). It’s apparently good for taller riders also, with a rating for folks up to 6’4″ (193 cm). I’m squarely in the middle of that range, so I can’t personally speak to the extremes, but it felt great to me in terms of sizing.

It can also fit a wide range of rider weights thanks to its maximum capacity of 330 lb (150 kg). In addition to the rider payload, the rear rack can carry 75 lb (34 kg), while the front basket can carry 35 lb (16 kg).

And as part of the launch, Lectric is including the cargo package consisting of the front and rear basket for free! Getting an entire trike plus the cargo package for just 1,499 is a hell of a deal.

So how does it ride?

Here’s the crazy part: Despite being nice and gentle when you keep it in the lower power modes, there’s some significant torque in the higher power modes that is great for hill climbing.

The Lectric team took me to a hill that looked like a small mountain, and I was able to ride the Lectric XP Trike right up the side of it. We even put a few dozen pounds of steel weight in the rear basket to give me a sense of what it’d be like if I was a heavier rider. The trike didn’t care – it just kept climbing like a machine.

Coming back down the side of the mountain helped me appreciate those hydraulic disc brakes, especially when I remembered how much steel weight I had in the back.

Moving to a park next, I did a combination of paved trail and off-road grass riding. The trike performed well at both. Tight donuts are even possible, though you have to be careful about going too tight. I could get the outer wheel to lift up in tight turns if I really tried, but it was something I had to make an effort to achieve. I never felt like I would tip in a normal turn.

Is it as stable as the RadTrike? Not quite. That one feels like the king of stable trikes to me. And the Lectric XP Trike is a tad narrower in the back and has a bit higher center of gravity with taller wheels and a higher cargo rack in back. But it still feels plenty stable, and I’d be comfortable putting my parents on it – if that puts things into perspective.

While there’s no suspension on the trike, you’re never really going fast enough to feel like it’s critical. Suspension is more important to me at higher speeds where I hit obstacles with more force and where I have less time to avoid them. At a maximum speed of 14 mph, you see things coming up in slow motion and can easily wiggle around them.

As you can see in the video above, I even took the Lectric XP Trike over some seriously rugged terrain in a washed out dry riverbed. I was truly surprised how well it handled such rough off-road conditions.

That being said, the three wheels takes some getting used to when avoiding obstacles. You have to learn how to put the pot holes or rocks between two of the three wheels or take a wide berth around them.

It’s something that new trike riders will take a few days to get used to, but quickly becomes second nature.

Top comment by tanker

I think this Lectric Trike is an industry disruptor; at 1499, no other manufacturer is offering so many features on an e-trike. Either other manufacturers will lower the of their trikes, or Lectric is going to raise the price of its trikes soon after the first production run sells out.

FWD trikes are simply not able to compete with the performance of RWD trikes.

Rear differential mass centralization of putting the motor battery in the middles of all three wheels is key to stability of a trike.

At its price, can probably resell it quick if the performance is not what’s expected.

I’m tempted to buy two of them just to have one trike per in-law so they won’t fight to ride.

Yes, tadpole recumbent trikes may be faster, more stable in corners, but not many elders have the flexibility to bend down near ground level and hoist themselves onto the low seating of a recumbent.

Getting off a recumbent after a good ride? good luck with those tired legs/knees.

It may not seem difficult for those who have the flexibility strength to get in out of a low seating recumbent, but for older folks that might as well be getting in out of a DeLorean.

Lectric has done their homework with this trike; I hope they keep the price low and sell a ton of these trikes.

At just 1,499, this is a smoking hot deal, and it follows Lectric’s playbook of bringing popular e-bikes at affordable to the masses.

How long will the bike last? I have no idea. I only spent a day with it.

But the trike felt solid so far, and I also saw a room full of customer service representatives sitting in Lectric’s Phoenix headquarters waiting to help anyone should they have an issue in the future, which gives me good confidence on the customer support side.

For the thousands of people aging into electric trike territory every day, I’m excited to see options like this hitting the market. And once I get even more time on the XP Trike than just a fun day in the sun, I’m sure I’ll like it even more.

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The best electric bike conversion kits 2023 and how to fit them

The best electric bike conversion kits can give you an extra boost of power without the expense of purchasing a new electric bike. We’ve fitted some of the best e-bike conversion kits ourselves, so will walk you through the process, how easy it is and how the different systems perform.

E-bikes are soaring in popularity – and for good reason. The best electric bikes replace a car for running errands around town and greatly increase the distances it’s possible to ride on one of the best commuter bikes. An e-bike can also be a great tool for boosting your fitness, whether that’s enabling you to ride with a greater range of people or offering the motivation of a greater range of roads to explore.

But is an e-bike worth it,? As the best ebike conversion kits promise to add power to an ‘analogue’ bike for a lot less than a full ebike, it’s an easy, cheaper way to get an electric boost.

In this guide we’ll take you through the surprisingly broad range of benefits an e-bike conversion kit has to offer and – most importantly – how to perform an e-bike conversion, based on our hands-on experience. For a walk-through on how to do it, you can check out the video above or read on for a step-by-step guide – it genuinely is so much simpler than you would think.

When buying an ebike conversion kit there are a number of factors you’ll need to consider. Most importantly you’ll need a kit that will fit your bike. To help with this it pays to take a few frame measurements, notably the width of your forks and the width of the rear stays, as well as noting the wheel size and the type of brakes. You can then match these details to the kit specifications.

Naturally you’ll also need to consider the cost and how much you chose to spend on an ebike conversion kit will be dictated by not only your budget but also your needs. If you’re unsure of just how much you’ll use the converted bike then it’s prudent to opt for a cheaper kit. you can always upgrade down the road.

You’ll also want to consider where the motor will be located, and match this to your bike and your mechanical prowess. Front hub motors are typically the easiest to fit, while mid-drive motors require more effort. A rear hub motor lies somewhere in between the two, and like a front hub option is applicable to a wide range of bikes.

Other considerations include the type of battery and the wattage rating. 36 or 48 volt battery is standard, with wattage usually running from 300 to 600 watts.

The Swytch kit is super-simple: just swap out your front wheel, wire up the controller and battery and you’re off. The battery is also very compact, allowing you to remove it from the bike easily to carry with you.

The TongSheng kit positions the motor at the centre of the bike, so it will fit to a wide range of designs. It’s lightweight for its high torque and power output, although you’ll need to buy the battery separately.

The Voilamart kit is an inexpensive rear wheel conversion option, although you’ll have to source a battery separately. It’s slightly fiddly to fit as well and requires additional waterproofing if you plan to ride in wet weather.

The best electric bike conversion kits

You can trust Cycling Weekly.

Our team of experts put in hard miles testing cycling tech and will always share honest, unbiased advice to help you choose. Find out more about how we test.

Specifications

Wheel sizes: Each wheel is custom built – specify your required size at checkout (Bromptons also catered for)

Reasons to avoid

The newly updated Swytch system is one of the simplest conversion kits to fit out there. The latest version, launched in August 2022, has a smaller, neater battery pack that improves the bike’s dynamics and lowers its weight. There’s the choice of the Air battery (700g, range 15km) or the Max battery (1,100g, range 30km). Both use the same mount, which places the battery to the front of the handlebar.

The motor sits in the front hub and we found it to be pretty discreet. Incidentally, the new batteries will work with the original motor and pedal sensor, so if you already own the original kit you can upgrade it with just a new battery without having to buy the whole kit again.

The Swytch kit is incredibly easy to fit. It took us around 30 minutes working at a steady pace.

We tested it on both a reasonably light two-speed steel bike and a heavier Pinnacle utility bike. It transformed the ride of the two-speed bike, making it fast, nimble and responsive. We also found the stated range to be conservative: after 20 miles on setting number two (medium assist) it had only used two bars out of five on the battery.

With the heavier Pinnacle on maximum assist (and on draggy routes) we were getting slightly under the 30km for the Max battery. As with all e-bike batteries, range depends on the terrain, weight of bike and level of assist.

Great customer support makes this one of the best kits for people who are new to working on their bike and who aren’t familiar with electrics. And even if you do have a strong background in both those areas, a simple system is always appreciated.

Reasons to avoid

Like the Bafang mid-drive system below, the TongSheng offers the same benefits of compatibility with a wide range of bike designs and a high torque for steep hills and off-road terrain. However, the TongSheng mid-drive does manage to be a little lighter than the Bafang for approximately the same power.

This model doesn’t come with a battery included, so you’ll have to source your own 36v item. As a rule of thumb, around 10Ah will give a range of 29km / 18mi, whereas going up to 18Ah will typically give around 53km / 33mi, so be sure to factor that in when you’re making your choice.

There’s a huge range of batteries sold on Amazon, but Green Cell is a particular brand we’d recommend.

We found fitting to be reasonably easy. As with most mid-drive systems, you replace your crank and chainring with the one provided in the kit. There’s an LCD display for attaching to your handlebars and you’ll need a battery to be hooked up to the motor.

Read more: TongSheng TSDZ2 conversion kit review

Reasons to avoid

A mid-motor drive system offers a number of benefits over hub-driven conversion kits. With the power delivered at the cranks it can produce more torque, making it more effective on particularly steep and bumpy terrain.

Another perk is that the compatibility is much greater – no concern about wheel diameters, hub widths, axle standards and brake type. No matter whether you’re running rim brakes or disc, quick release or thru-axle, the crank driven system is compatible with all.

The only proviso is that the frame material must be alloy and the bottom bracket width is 68–73mm – but that covers most bikes you’re likely to be fitting this system to.

There are a few aspects to be aware of, the first being that this system doesn’t include a battery and that typically makes up about half the cost of a conversion kit. Finding an e-bike battery is quite straightforward with many being sold on Amazon, with Green Cell being among those we’d recommend.

Just make sure to get a 36V one for this motor as a higher voltage can damage it. Also you should be aware that capacity of 10Ah will give you a range of about 29km / 18mi, while a capacity of 18Ah typically gives about 53km / 33mi – so be sure to factor in the distances you’re planning on riding.

Reasons to avoid

This radically different approach from Rubbee makes for an e-bike conversion with much fewer parts. The battery and motor are housed in a single unit which powers the bike directly turning the rear wheel with its integrated roller.

Not only is the initial installation notably fast and easy, the quick release system means that you can take off the unit for rides that you don’t wish to be assisted on. At 2.8kg, it doesn’t add much weight to that of the bike, making the bike easier to handle.

The range of this model is quite low, limited to Eco mode it only offers a range of 16km / 10mi – although taking the device off to charge at the other end is easy to do and it only takes an hour to top up. There is the option to increase your range by buying additional battery modules that fit into the base unit.

Up to three can be accommodated, which in turn increases the maximum range to 48km / 30mi, or around 23km / 14mi with moderately heavy use. However, unlike many other e-bike systems, the Rubbee X supports regenerative braking, allowing you to scrub back some power on the descents.

Reasons to avoid

Bafang is a well established maker of electric bike motors and offers a front hub based motor, if you’re not a fan of the bulky profile a mid motor conversion system creates. You can buy this kit without a battery – although why would you? – but if you sensibly also opt for a power-pack there’s a choice of amp hours, and you can select either a downtube or a rear-rack mounted version.

The setup follows the same principles as most front-wheel e-bike conversions. First you need to set up the wheel with a disc rotor, tyre and inner tube and install that into the bike. Then attach the cadence sensor – so it can tell when you’re pedalling and need assistance – then attach the battery and the LCD display and you’re essentially good to go!

It’s worth bearing in mind that although this conversion kit comes in many different wheel sizes, it is only compatible with bikes that have a front disc brake and a Quick-Release axle. If your disc brake bike is a newer, more expensive model, it might not be compatible, so worth checking first.

Remember, that in the UK electric bike laws mean that e-bikes are not permitted to have a power output of more than 250w and shouldn’t propel the bike when it’s travelling more than 15.5mph – you’ll have to make sure you select the right model with the relevant limitations.

Reasons to avoid

We’ve also tested the Voilamart kit, which comes with six main parts: the replacement rear wheel, the replacement brake levers, the control screen, pedal sensor, throttle and the control box. It doesn’t come with a battery however.

On review we found the kit pretty straightforward to fit, although you’ll need to remove the bike’s crank to fit the pedal sensor and this element of the conversion was a bit fiddly. Another potential drawback is that the connectors, which link to control unit, aren’t waterproof, with only a bag supplied to house the delicate electronics. While it does a good job of keeping everything tidy, we decided to buy a plastic enclosure, cut the wires to length, solder the connections and then heat shrink for added protection.

As for the ride, the rear wheel kit delivers plenty of power. However, since the pedal sensor only detects when you’re pedalling rather than how hard you’re pedalling it delivers the power as soon as your start to turn the crank arms. Fortunately, you can quickly adjust the level assistance, with five power options available.

All in all the Voliamart rear wheel kit is an affordable way to ‘go electric’, although it requires you to be mechanical competent to fit it and you’ll need to factor in the additional cost of a battery.

How to convert your bike to an e-bike in four steps

Here’s our step-by-step guide to how to add an electric bike conversion kit to your pedal-powered bike.

Swap the tyre and tube

Firstly, remove the tyre and tube from your current front wheel and then install them on the new wheel from the kit. Make sure to check if the tyre is directional, if it is, ensure that the tyre is mounted so that the cable sticking out of the hub is on the left-hand side (non-driveside) when the wheel is installed in the bike – otherwise it’ll be powered in the opposite direction to your direction of travel!

To swap the tyre and tube over, you will need some tyre levers and a pump. If you want to go over how to do these, we have a guide that can be accessed here.

Final points are to do up the nuts on the wheel’s axle to keep it firmly in place in the forks and to check that the brakes are correctly adjusted for the new wheel. If you’re unsure how to do that, we have another guide here.

Attach the bracket to the handlebars

There is a strap that needs to be attached to the bars to keep the bracket in place and stop it rotating around. There are also some adaptors included in the kit which can be used if your handlebars are a little skinnier.

But essentially all that’s needed to be done here is a couple of screws to clamp the bracket tightly to the bars.

Attach magnet disc and sensor

The magnet disc has a split design so it can just clip around the inside of the left (non-driveside crank) and is then held in place by its retention ring. Next, stick the sensor on the frame directly in line with the magnets – this will ensure that the sensor can tell when the cranks are moving.

Plug in the cables

The thickest one is the main power cable and that just needs to be plugged into the cable extending from the hub. The other orange cable attaches to the cadence sensor and this just needs plugging in as well.

It’s then a good idea to use some cable ties to tidy up the lengths of the cables a little bit, so they aren’t flapping about and risk getting caught on the spokes or on the cranks.

The blue cables, you don’t need to worry about, these are for an optional brake sensor upgrade kit.

Why convert your bike to an e-bike?

What types of conversion kit are available?

You can get conversion kits that power your front or rear wheel or power the bikes via the cranks.

Wheel-based systems usually have a hub motor and require replacement of your existing wheel with a compatible motorised one.

The alternative is a system like the Rubbee that drives your wheel by pushing on the tyre. Tyre wear can be an issue here though.

Finally, there are systems that power the e-bike via the bottom bracket.

Usually the e-bike’s battery will bolt onto your frame or be attached to your handlebars, although sometimes you can fit a battery pack to a rear rack.

We’ve more on compatibility. which can be an issue. below.

How much does it cost to convert a bike to an e-bike?

vary depending on the type of conversion kit and the size of the battery. To give a rough Band, you can expect to pay a total of between £500 and £800 from a reputable brand, but there will be outliers at either end.

Is it worth converting a bike to an e-bike?

There are many reasons to upgrade your bike to offer a little e-assistance. On the one hand, it can greatly increase the usefulness of your bike, enabling you to replace short car journeys – such as around town, to the shops, or to work – with going by bike instead.

It’s a lot more environmentally friendly getting about on two wheels than in a two-ton metal box. It can also save you time – bikes are able to take more direct routes and are less affected by traffic, as well as eliminating the need to search for a parking space at the other end.

But beyond just their practical benefits, e-bikes can also be a potent tool for boosting your fitness. Consistency is key when it comes to exercise, so making commitments with friends is a great way to ensure you’re heading out the door. Previously, differing fitness levels could make it difficult to find a riding partner but with an e-bike levelling the playing field, getting in a productive workout (for both of you) with a friend is much easier to do.

Added to that, an e-bike can be much more motivating in that it opens up a far greater range of roads than you’d be able to access just under the power of your own two legs. Exploring new roads is part of the fun of riding a bike and an e-bike can help preserve that.

Can you convert any regular bike to an e-bike?

Most bikes can be converted to an e-bike – it just requires getting the matching the right conversion kit to match the specification.

For conversion kits where the motor is located at the wheel’s hub, you’ll need to consider the wheel’s diameter, the width and axle standard of the hub and whether it uses rim or disc brakes. For instance, a 700c (AKA, 28”) disc brake wheel with a 100mm wide quick-release hub is a relatively common spec. Once you’ve determined what type of wheel you need, the conversion is quite a straightforward process

Crank driven systems are generally easier in terms of determining compatibility; the requirements are typically just an alloy frame and a bottom bracket width of between 68 and 73mm – which is the standard for all road and mountain bikes, it’s only specialist bikes that have a different spacing there. In replacing the crankset, these systems are a bit more involved to fit than a hub system, but still well within the remit of a home mechanic.

Other kits, such as those that directly drive the rear tyre, have almost universal compatibility – provided your tyres aren’t too heavily treaded.

Are electric bike conversion kits any good?

You won’t be getting the very best motors and the largest, seamlessly integrated batteries with an e-bike conversion kit. But with that said, e-bike conversion kits are much cheaper than purchasing a whole new e-bike and they do deliver many of the same benefits.

Converted e-bikes are great for commuting and utility cycling, giving that extra boost to help flatten hills, motor along the flat and lug about heavy loads. E-bike conversions are also good for leisure cycling, helping to moderate your effort level as needed and greatly extending the range you can explore.

For more specialist utility needs, buying a new cargo e-bike would help boost your carrying capacity and range. Equally, for the aesthetically conscious, the latest breed of e-road bikes are almost indistinguishable from a non-powered bike at first glance. Then again, both those options are much more expensive than a conversion.

How we test

Where we’ve been able to link to a review, it means that we’ve put the ebike conversion kit through its paces. We’ve assessed how easy it is to fit and maintain as well other factors such as quality of the components and battery life and charge time. Riding the bike once fitted with the kit, we’ve taken into account the ride quality, the ease of use and the battery range.

Where we haven’t yet had the chance to review an item, we’re still confident in recommending it as one of the best, because we either know the brand really well, and have probably tested another product or the previous version and can still happily recommend it as one of the best.

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