Best electric bikes for commuting 2023: Get to work faster and with less effort. Cool e bikes

The best electric bikes of 2023

The Ride1UP Rift is an outstanding electric bicycle bike whether you’re headed to work or joyriding around town.

Offering all the basic ebike elements at a lower cost, the Ancheer Blue Spark is a great budget ebike.

The Priority Current gets up to max speed quickly and maintains that speed once it gets there.

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While electric bikes have existed in some form or another for more than a century, the modern version was properly introduced in the 1990s—to little fanfare. At the time, they were considered something of a novelty and failed to generate much interest. That changed in the 2000s, when ebikes took off in China. In the last 10 years, the rest of us have come around: There are countless ebikes now, which come in configurations to suit every rider’s needs. But with so many to choose from, how do you pick the one that will put you out in front of the pack? The best electric bikes deliver power (duh), comfort, style, and Smart features, whether you’re riding for sport, for work, or simply as a way to get around.

How we selected the best electric bikes

As a lifelong outdoor and fitness enthusiast, bicycling has always been a part of my recreational repertoire. From daily commuting to work via road bike to mountain biking through the rurals of my native state of Washington, I’ve spent more than my fair share of time perched upon the pedals. When it came to electric bikes in particular, I took the testing very seriously—by which I mean I had a lot of fun riding around! At this point, I’ve ridden ebikes from an expansive range of brands both renowned and up-and-coming, have discussed the pros and cons of different options with industry experts, and have even built several of them piece by piece straight out of the box.

I’ve written about outdoor and fitness gear, including electric bikes, for publications like Popular Mechanics, Runner’s World, the Manual, Thrillist, the Daily Beast, and the Los Angeles Times. All that testing has made me an expert at recognizing genuine quality over hype. In categories where my judgment was a tie, I looked to impressions from real-world owners to verify which ebikes deliver a truly electrifying experience.

The best electric bikes: Reviews Recommendations

Our selections for the best electric bikes span a spectrum of budgets, from several hundred dollars to several thousand. We’ve included ebikes from a variety of categories that include a fairly wide range of features, so while which is right for you is determined largely by your specific needs, we think the options below cover the bases for most new and veteran riders.

Best overall: Ride1Up Rift

Why it made the cut: Ride1UP’s Rift is easy to assemble and feels smooth to ride.

  • Easy to assemble
  • Solid frame and overall construction
  • Comfortable to ride
  • Cost

After a few rides I began to see Ride1UP’s Rift as wish fulfillment for anyone who’s been curious about electric bicycles. The Rift was almost fully assembled when it arrived, which is very helpful if you’ve never put together an electric bicycle. We recommend following Ride1Up’s video instructions for a step-by-step guide on what’s required to put it together. It’s possible to assemble this bicycle by yourself, but it’s far easier for two people since one can keep the Rift steady, or lift up its frame while the other attaches its front wheel. The one accessory you’ll need when assembling any eBike—beyond the correct tools—is an air compressor to fill its tires.

Once the bicycle was set up, and a helmet was firmly strapped to my head, it was time to take the Rift for a ride on the suburban streets of Long Island. The area I rode on was paved but hilly, and it gave me the chance to put this electric bicycle’s motor to the test. I started by riding around without any “pedal assistance,” to get a feel for how the Rift handled. It’s a heavy electric bicycle, but after a couple of minutes I had a good handle on how to take wide and sharper turns, or how its fat tires would handle bumps in the road, hoses, or smaller potholes.

None of these smaller obstacles posed a problem thanks to the Rift’s fat tires, though we wouldn’t recommend going over huge bumps just for fun. Ride1UP recommends checking the bicycle’s brakes several times before taking it for a ride to make sure they’re fully operational, and these small test rides gave me the opportunity to do so—though I also checked them before getting on the Rift for the first time.

All of the Rift’s pedal assistance features are accessible via a 2.2-inch color screen mounted on the left handlebar. It’s easy to check your trip time, power consumption, and pedal assistance level (between one and five) at a glance. You shouldn’t be spending a lot of time looking at the screen while riding, so we appreciate how cleanly this information is arranged. As its name suggests, pedal assistance will only kick in when you’re pedaling. The electric bicycle’s motor will kick on after a few seconds, which gives you time to adjust to the increase in speed. Settings one and two feel like a nice little push while you’re going up hills—enough of a boost to make them easier to climb while still requiring effort.

Cranking the Rift’s pedal assistance up to four or five will turn pedaling into a performative act. We were able to get up steep hills with ease, but always felt completely in control of the bicycle. Yes, the Rift can up to 28 miles per hour with pedal assistance cranked up to five, but we never felt like we were going too quickly. If you’ve never used an electric bicycle before we recommend sticking to the lower power levels to start and working your way up.

Overall, the Ride1UP Rift is a stupendously smooth ride whether you’re upgrading from a different electric bicycle or have always ridden an analog bike. It strikes the right balance between easy assembly, ease of use, comfort, and overall design.

Best electric bikes for commuting 2023: Get to work faster and with less effort

The best electric bikes for commuting help you get to and from work faster and with less effort. That means that you’ll arrive less hot and also gives you a boost away from traffic lights and other stops on your ride.

You’ll become fitter and your commute may well take less time than by car or public transport as you’ll probably find quicker routes that you can only take by bike. It’s likely to be cheaper too, once the up-front cost of the electric bike has been discounted.

Depending on how far you’re planning to ride, your needs will differ. Our pick of the best electric bikes for commuting below covers everything from a folder for a short hop to and from the station to drop bar bikes for a long distance commute that maybe includes some off-road riding.

Cyclingnews has a huge amount of advice on electric bikes if you want to know more.

Our guide to the best electric bikes gives you a more comprehensive range of options, while our pick of the best folding electric bikes offers options that make a compact package for storage or to carry on public transport.

If you’ve got a budget in mind we have guides to the best electric bikes under £1,000/1,000 and the best electric bikes under 2,000/£2,000. You can even convert a non-electric bike to an e-bike with the best electric bike conversion kits.

Alternatively scroll down for our pick of the best electric bikes for commuting, or head to the bottom for a guide on how to choose and an explainer of the laws on electric bikes worldwide.

Best electric bikes for commuting

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Reasons to avoid

The Orbea Gain has such subtle integration of the battery and motor that, at first glance, you’d be hard-pushed to know it was an e-bike. It has an attractive, lightweight, aluminium frame and carbon fork with an 11-speed Shimano 105 drivetrain which should see you over any terrain. Well-disguised within that frame is a 248 Wh battery which should be plenty to get you to work and back.

If, however, you’d like more range, you can simply attach the external water-bottle-style battery and that’ll boost the battery capacity up to 456 Wh. Pedalling assistance is provided by a rear hub motor, which works in a concept Orbea are calling Enough Power and Enough Energy. The idea is that the bike intuitively offers enough power to keep you pedalling smoothly and efficiently to enhance your rider, rather than overwhelming you with big surges in power.

The bike comes with an app that allows you to change the bike’s functionality, including how power is applied as well as ride tracking your rides. The mode button on the top tube has coloured LEDs that show you how much battery is remaining, and which power mode you are in. There’s now an additional bar-mounted controller/computer which gives you more info and which sits on an out-front mount with a built-in LED light.

As a full size e-bike, the Gain isn’t going to be easy to take on public transport though, unlike a small wheeled folder like the Brompton Electric.

Reasons to avoid

If you’ve ever been on the market for a commuter bike you will have almost certainly cast your eyes upon a Brompton. The British company has sustained a great reputation built on ingenuity and build quality for so long that you know you’ll be riding a high-quality machine.

If you need a bike that packs up into a small space, on a train or in the office, for example, a Brompton is likely the best electric commuter bike for you. The C Line Electric bike comes with front and rear lights fitted, as well as mudguards, and the 6-speed gears give you loads of range. Helped by the motor, you’ll get to work easily however hilly your city is.

The company has fitted a 250 W motor to the bike, with a large-enough 300 Wh battery. The battery sits in a pack that conveniently unclips from the front of the bike and can be carried over your shoulder to your office or home to be charged. A full charge should be achieved within four hours. The quoted range for the battery is up to 70 km if you have it on its most energy-efficient setting. There is an LED indicator on the top of the bag which shows you how much of the battery you have remaining, which power mode you are in, and what setting your lights are on.

The bag-plus-bike set-up does make carrying the bike that bit more difficult though, although it does make charging a lot easier than an integrated battery like that on the VanMoof and the Orbea Gain and lowers the weight of the bike when you need to carry it.

There’s a P Line Brompton Electric available as well as the classic C Line Electric. Lighter components and fewer gears drop the weight quoted by Brompton from the C Line’s 17.4kg to 15.6kg.

You can read more in our full review of the Brompton C-Line Electric bike.

Reasons to avoid

The first thing that strikes you with the VanMoof S3 is just how modern it looks. The bike has very clean lines, classic geometry and most of the cables are hidden. The company sells five bikes, with either a standard crossbar or a more step-through frame design, including the VanMoof V which is rated to 31mph (although this model needs to be registered and insured to ride in the UK and Europe).

As well as automatic gearing, VanMoof’s anti-theft package means that if your bike gets stolen, they will personally track it down and if they can’t find it, they’ll replace it with a new one.

A feature that is still quite rare on bikes at the moment is the automatic gearbox. The Sturmey Archer gearbox will react to your accelerations and speed and make sure you’re always in the best gear. Should you wish, you can alter the timing of the gear changes with the VanMoof app. The 250 W motor is powered by a 504 Wh battery, with a range of between 60 to 150 km depending on the mode you have the bike in and the terrain you’re riding over.

There’s lots of integration, like the LED array built into the top tube, built-in lights, lock and alarm and location tracking from the VanMoof app, although the built-in battery and high weight mean that charging is not as easy as with a separate battery like that on the Brompton Electric.

Reasons to avoid

Ribble is at the forefront of value-for-money, high-specification, well-integrated e-road bikes. Many of the hallmarks of this capability are evident in this hybrid bike, which should handle both your commute and leisure rides with ease.

The basis of the bike is a strikingly good-looking lightweight aluminium frame within which there is a battery so well hidden that you barely notice it’s there. A subtle button and LED light on the top tube allow you to see how much battery is left and let you choose how much assistance you want. If you want even more control of the settings, you can change the settings in Ribble’s app.

The bike is impressively kitted out too, with a Mavic wheelset, a rear pannier rack, a bell, front and rear lights and full-length mudguards. As with all bikes where you can’t remove the battery, including the Orbea and the VanMoof, you will have to take this bike within touching distance of mains power to charge it up.

Reasons to avoid

While Tern claims the GSD isn’t intended to be a car killer, it may well be just that. The company is best known for its folding bikes, and while the GSD isn’t a fully foldable bike, the seat post and handlebars do collapse to make storage of this bike a little more compact. The reason it can’t fold down much smaller is this is not your average folding bike. This is a heavy-duty cargo bike, capable of carrying up to 200 kg, be that luggage, or should you attach the right seat, two passengers on the back.

The bike employs a dual battery system, which is 400Wh and 500Wh in size. Should you have both of them attached you’ll have a whopping 900Wh of capacity. This will be enough to assist your cycling for between 110 and 250 km depending on which of the 4 modes you have it in. The 10-speed Shimano hub gears and impressive 85Nm of torque mean you’ll be able to get up any hill, even when fully laden. It comes complete with wide, grippy tyres, a rear luggage mount, a kickstand, front and rear lights, and mudguards.

It’s a heavy duty cargo carrying option, but not as practical as a folder like the Brompton C Line Electric or a bike with less luggage capacity like the Ribble if you have less need of carrying capacity.

Reasons to avoid

Built for comfortable as well as speedy commutes, the Trek Domane LT electric bike gets Trek’s IsoSpeed seatpost decoupler built in to increase the isolation of your rear end from road vibrations. There’s front IsoSpeed too to add comfort at the handlebars. Wide 32mm tyres help add comfort and grip as well and you can either fit mudguards or even wider rubber for rougher routes into the office.

The Fazua motor’s phone app lets you fine-tune the motor’s output levels to match your power needs, so you can upscale the power delivery if you need more support for faster getaways or tone it down if you want to preserve battery life.

The Fazua drivetrain is removable from the bike, so you can ride without assistance, save weight and use the space that held the motor for storage, while Trek’s endurance geometry makes the Domane LT a comfortable ride for the long haul commute.

The Domane LT is still available for now, but the new (and even more expensive) Domane SLR that replaces it is lighter and (for US riders) faster.

Reasons to avoid

You might initially mistake this bike for a mountain bike, rather than one cut out for commuting. In reality, the 2.3-inch tyres and 80 mm travel suspension fork are perfect not for the trails but smoothing out bumps and road buzz on your commute. If you live in slightly more remote areas, the bike should also deal with gravel or hard-pack dirt trails with ease.

The bike comes with a large 710 Wh battery which powers a trusty Specialized motor and a SRAM NX groupset with a wide enough range to get you over any terrain. To keep you safe, it also comes with hydraulic disc brakes which will provide dependable braking in any weather conditions. It comes with front and rear mudguards, and a rear pannier rack to carry any work stuff from A to B without having to wear a backpack. It’s available as a step-through as well as the version with a top tube shown above.

You get extra comfort, range and a more powerful motor, but the Turbo Vado isn’t as sprightly as the Orbea Gain or the Cannondale Synapse.

Reasons to avoid

If you want to speed up your e-bike commute, a drop bar racer will give you a more aerodynamic ride position that should be faster than a flat bar hybrid like the Ribble, the Specialized or the Orbea. The Cannondale Synapse Neo comes with a powerful Bosch motor that’s mid-mounted for stability and a high capacity battery for plenty of range. The EQ version also gets mudguards, a rear rack (not shown in the image above) and lights so it’s all-weather ready and easy to load up.

There’s a 10-speed Shimano Tiagra drivetrain with plenty of gear range, that along with the motor should make a breeze of hills on your ride into town. The hydraulic disc brakes mean assured stopping and the 35mm wide Schwalbe tyres should provide comfort over broken roads or even if your commute takes in a towpath or gravel track. There’s plenty of range from the large 500Wh battery too.

Reasons to avoid

Hummingbird has engineered its folding electric bike to be as light as possible. A carbon fibre main frame paired to a cantilevered truss rear section and lightweight components bring the overall weight down to a claimed 10.3kg.

The Hummingbird bike doesn’t fold down quite as small as a Brompton Electric, it’s only singlespeed so might not work for hillier cities and the range is quite limited at around 50km, but Hummingbird has upped the torque from the 250 watt motor so there’s more pulling power to help get you moving. All that engineering means that the Hummingbird bike is expensive though.

Best electric bike for commuting: everything you need to know

There’s a lot to think about when selecting an electric bike for your commute, so we’ve provided a breakdown of the key points here. There’s more information in our guide to the best electric bikes as well.

Why is an electric bike good for commuting?

An electric bike can make your commute a lot more comfortable. It can make stops and starts a lot easier, provide assistance on uphills and increase your overall average speed, while lowering the effort you need to put in, so you should arrive less hot and tired than on a non-electric bike. You may feel more comfortable riding a longer distance too.

It’s also likely to be a lot more comfortable than a ride on public transport and you can choose your own time to travel, while you’re less prone to delays due to congestion than in a motor vehicle.

Many towns and cities now have dedicated cycling routes, so you may not need to compete with motorised traffic and might be able to skip queues and even get a jump at traffic lights due to cyclist priority signalling. There are also often quietway routes for cyclists that bypass main roads and take you away from traffic and may route you around bottlenecks.

On the flip side, most electric bikes are quite heavy, so moving them around at the beginning and end of a ride will be harder work than with a non-powered bike. If your commute involves public transport it will be harder to get your electric bike on and off than with a non-powered bike and you may not be able to take a non-folding bike at peak times. The best folding electric bikes will help here.

You also need to make sure that you can keep your electric bike charged up so you don’t run out of juice halfway home in the rain (although electric bikes are designed so that you can pedal them without assistance). That means having a handy power outlet close by where you park your bike, either at home or at work, or an e-bike with a removeable battery. You might need a second charger at work too.

What material should my frame be made of?

The three most common frame materials you’ll come across when looking for a bike are aluminium, steel and carbon, although titanium might make an occasional appearance.

Carbon is most often used in the best road bikes because of its low weight and high stiffness. However, it can be quite fragile, and innocuous bumps could cause very expensive damage, so if you’re locking your bike up in communal locations, we recommend you stay away.

Most bikes you look at for commuting are likely to be made from aluminium, and for good reason. It’s fairly cheap, very durable and not subject to corrosion.

You may find some electric bikes are made of steel. While it is tough and can take some bumps and bruises, it is relatively heavy and can be subject to corrosion.

What should I look for in an electric bike motor?

Most e-bike motors are power-limited to 250 watts, but they can provide varying amounts of torque, measured in Newton-metres (Nm). If your commute is flattish and you’re fairly fit, a motor with around 40Nm to 50Nm torque is likely to be fine, but if you’re riding somewhere more arduous or expect to be carrying a lot, then a motor with more torque will be better. Some go up to 80Nm or more, which is what an electric mountain bike puts out.

A mid-mounted motor is likely to keep your e-bike most stable, as it’s low down and central on the bike. But a rear hub motor isn’t likely to have a significant impact on handling and, as your weight is over the rear wheel, grip isn’t likely to be an issue.

Front hub motors are more tricky, as there’s less weight on the wheel and so less grip and the extra weight can affect the bike’s handling if it’s not been carefully designed.

How much battery capacity do I need?

As with all technologies, it’s easy to look back at some original e-bikes and notice how bulky they looked. Batteries were bolted onto frames wherever there was space and were often very low capacity. Fortunately, we’re beginning to see much bigger capacity batteries and sleeker integration of both batteries and motors.

Typically, the smaller the physical size of the battery, the lower its capacity, and the fewer miles you’ll get out of it. For most people, this shouldn’t be an issue, with even small batteries having enough juice to get you to work where you can charge up again or serving duty for multiple days of commuting.

Battery size is most often expressed in watt-hours (Wh), and the amount of assistance you’ll get from it depends on how much you ask of it. For example, a 300 watt-hour battery can provide 300 watts of assistance for one hour, or 100 W of assistance for 3 hours.

A battery can weigh several kilograms and make up a significant proportion of an electric bike’s weight. That’s okay in a non-folding bike, although it can make moving the bike to a storage area at the end of a ride harder. It’s more of an issue with a folding bike designed for portability, so a bike like the Brompton C Line Electric will often have a lower capacity battery to make it easier to carry.

How do I charge my electric bike?

Some bikes have removable battery packs making them simple to unclip and charge, even if your bike is left outside or in a communal bike store. Others, typically those with more integration, require you to charge the battery while it is attached to your bike, meaning you’ll have to hook it up to the mains in your house, garage, or at the office, so it’s worth checking to see how easy this might be for you.

You’re either going to have to carry your charger with you or buy a second one if you need to charge the e-bike at both ends of your commute. Some electric bikes like the Orbea can be fitted out with a range extender battery if you do need more range, but in reality most commutes are likely to be short enough for range not to be an issue even with the lowest battery capacity, unless you expect to go multiple days without recharging.

How many gears do I need?

As usual, the stock answer is that depends. If you live somewhere flat, a singlespeed electric bike may be enough for you. The extra power provided by the motor means that starting off will be a lot easier and faster than with a non-powered commuter bike.

At the other extreme, if your commute is hilly, you may need a full range of gearing, as found on the best commuter bikes which don’t include a motor. Again, the motor is a huge help here. Crank it up to maximum power output and it may pull you up steep inclines; lower the assistance level once you’ve reached the top to conserve battery life and range.

What additional features should I look for?

For commuting duties, it’s preferable to get the load you’re carrying off your back: you’ll be more comfortable and your centre of gravity will be lower. It may be easier to look around without a pack too, although the best cycling backpacks will be designed to address these issues.

If you’re planning to commute with your electric bike in all weathers, then look for mudguards or at least the option to fit mudguards to your bike. Likewise, winter commuting is likely to mean at least one journey in the dark. In-built lights are handy and they’ll often be run off the electric bike’s battery meaning that there’s less to remember to keep charged up.

You can pick up a set of the best bike lights relatively inexpensively though. It’s a good idea to use lights even during the daytime to up your visibility, particularly in town.

Take a look at our commuter bike accessories checklist for a longer list of things you might need for your commute.

How do I maintain my electric bike?

Bikes, like cars or any other mechanical device, need to be maintained. If you’re not an experienced mechanic, most things are simple enough to learn how to do yourself, but spend a little bit of money and a bike shop will have you good to go in no time. But, the fewer complicated parts, and the better you care for your bike, the less chance there is of things going wrong.

The gears on your bike, including the derailleurs, cables and shifters will require regular maintenance to keep them performing at their best. Some people are fortunate to live and work in flat areas and so they can get away with the simplicity and ease of a single-speed bike.

However, most of us live in areas with hills, and therefore gears are a necessity. Internally-geared hubs are a more robust, easier-to-maintain solution than derailleurs, but can be pricier. You’ll sometimes find a carbon fibre belt drive on bikes for commuting, which cuts down on maintenance over a chain-driven solution.

Maintaining your brakes in working order is arguably the single most important thing when looking after your bike. Jumpy gears and a loud chain might ruin your enjoyment, but poorly functional brakes could have much more dire consequences.

Classical brake systems, using a cable to join your lever and your brakes, have stuck around for so long because they’re simple and they work, but you do need to keep them properly maintained, regularly checking the cables for wear.

Higher-end bikes are often equipped with hydraulic disc brakes; not only do these work more effectively in poor weather conditions, once set up they should require less maintenance too. Disc brakes are trickling down the bike hierarchy and you might find them on quite inexpensive electric bikes.

What are the e-bike regulations where I live?

What classifies as an e-bike and what regulations apply to riding it vary by where you’re located.

At present, most e-bikes in the UK fall under EPAC (that’s the electrically assisted pedal cycle) amendment regulation mandate. This means bikes have to be moving before the motor can kick in, it can provide a maximum of 250 watts of aided power and has to stop aiding at 25 kph. You also have to be at least 14 years old to ride an e-bike.

So long as your bike meets these criteria (as all the ones in the article do), then you’ll have the same legal standing as regular bicycles and you’ll be allowed on roads and bike paths. If your bike assists you up to faster speeds it’ll be considered a two-wheel moped, and therefore you’ll require insurance, a certified helmet, and a valid driving licence.

In Australia e-bikes can assist you up to a maximum speed of 25 kph. The two legal systems in Australia are throttle-operated and pedal-assist. If you have a throttle-controlled bike it can provide up to 200 watts of power, whereas pedal-assist e-bikes can give you 250 watts of assistance. Anything above that is legally considered a motorbike and must therefore be licensed and insured.

Given the structure of the American legal system, the rules governing the use of e-bikes are predictably more complicated than those in the UK and Australia. Let’s begin.

Obviously, the laws governing the use of e-bikes vary from state to state, but these are often difficult to interpret. The all-encompassing, federal definition of an e-bike is “a two- or three-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph”.

As if that isn’t complicated enough, often state laws may override federal legislation. Some 33 states have statutes that define an e-bike in some way, while the rest lack any specific definition, and often chuck them in with other classes of vehicles. At present, 13 states are adhering to a three-tiered system proposed by The Bicycle Product Suppliers Association. While the motors on all classes of bikes can produce a maximum of 750 watts, they are tiered depending on their maximum assisted speed:

  • Class 1: the motor provides assistance only when the rider is pedalling, and cuts out at 20 mph
  • Class 2: the motor can contribute even if the rider is not pedalling, but cuts out at 20 mph
  • Class 3: the motor provides assistance when the rider is pedalling but cuts out at 28 mph and must be equipped with a speedometer

While class 1 and 2 bikes are allowed anywhere bikes are allowed, class 3 bikes can only be ridden on roads and bike lanes, but not multi-use paths. In the states that regard e-bikes as vehicles, licensing and registration may be required to operate an e-bike.

Yes, this is a lot to get your head around, but thankfully the kind folk at People for Bikes have put together a state-by-state guide.

E-Bikes That Look Like Motorcycles: Top 7

The classic e-bike can come in many forms, from road bike to mountain bike, cargo bike to folding bike — and even electric bicycles that are designed to look like motorbikes.

As you pedal, an electric motor is activated which gives you a power boost, helping you to achieve higher speeds, tackle tough climbs, and carry heavy loads with less effort.

That said, it’s important to note that electric bikes come with speed limiters that cut out the motor when you hit a certain speed dictated by local speed limit laws.

In the UK, Europe and Australia, e-bikes are not allowed to go faster than 15.5mph on public roads. In the US, they can go up to 28mph depending on the class of e-bike.

However, this does not necessarily mean that getting an e-bike is not worth it when compared to a regular bike: you’d be surprised how much this motor assist can help, especially when it comes to avoiding arriving at work a sweaty, tired mess.

Another common concern surrounding e-bikes is that they are more likely to get stolen. While, of course, they are generally much more expensive than regular bikes, you absolutely can mitigate the risk of having your electric-bike by having a proper bike security system in place. It’s better to be safe than sorry, whether you have an expensive e-bike or a budget bicycle.

Electric Motorcycle

Thanks to the global push for green energy, electric motorcycles are now a popular high-power, high-speed and accessible mode of transport for those looking for a two-wheeled EV.

Unlike electric bikes, electric motorcycles are powered entirely by the motor (no pedalling required), and can reach much higher speeds — we’re talking in excess of 100mph. As such, you will need a valid motorcycle licence to ride an electric motorcycle, and details of the type of licence you need for different motorbikes in the UK can be found on the Government website here.

Electric motorcycles offer motorcyclists a quiet, low-emission, environmentally-sustainable way to enjoy their rides without compromising on the cool look of a traditional motorbike.

Electric Moped

Electric mopeds are popular with commuter riders and those who frequently travel in urban areas thanks to their compact size and decent range.

As a general rule, electric mopeds are limited to a speed of 28mph and are powered between 1000W and 4000W, and can be ridden by anyone over 16 years of age who has passed a CBT course and has a category AM or P on their driving licence. This is the same as for 50cc petrol mopeds and scooters.

They cannot, however, be used on motorways, and are best suited to short zips around city roads.

E-Bike vs Electric Motorcycle vs Electric Moped [DIFFERENCES]

Electric BikeElectric MotorcycleElectric Moped
Pedal power and electric motor Electric motor Electric motor
Speed limited to 15.5mph in UK Fast speeds Limited to 28mph
Road bike, folding bike, MTB and more Range of motorbike designs Compact design for urban travel
Don’t need a licence to ride Licensing restrictions apply Licensing restrictions apply
Great for commuting and leisure Great for longer distance travel Great for short city rides

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Electric Bikes That Look Like Motorcycles [Top 7]

Super73 R-Series

Motor: 250W Throttle: No Weight: 36.3 kg Range: 120 km Wheel Size: 20″ Gears: 8-Speed

Street-legal per European regulations

Stable on and off road riding

Adjustable full suspension

The Super73 R-Series offers a combination of super-cool motorcycle looks and a street-legal electric bike riding experience. It has adjustable full suspension and four ride modes so you can customise your ride to your terrain. All of the Super73 models come street-legal per European regulations, so they don’t require a driver’s licence or registration, but this does mean that the speed is limited to 25 km/h with a continuous rated power of 250-watt motor. The four ride modes incorporate a ‘default mode’ which is street legal for all European countries as well as modes which allow pedal-assist at higher speeds which are strictly for use on private land. A stylish low-rise handlebar adds to the motorbike look, as do the GRZLY tyres which are made through a blend of motorcycle and bicycle tyre methods. These tyres’ proprietary SUPER73 tread pattern improves traction, reduces road noise and increases stability both on-road and off-road. The bike is designed to be fully customisable when it comes to accessories and apparel, so you can carry cargo your way with ease. Plus, the battery is removable so you can recharge it wherever you like, and the RX model has an estimated 64-120km of range depending on the pedal assist mode.

Electric Cargo Bike KBO Ranger

Generally speaking, the range of the KBO Ranger is about 35 miles per charge with throttle only. The KBO Ranger cargo e-bike can go up to 60 miles with pedaling. The maximum range of an electric bike is influenced by factors like cargo weight, incline, and pedal-assist levels. You can find the remaining battery capacity shown on the LCD display.

What is the top speed of a KBO Ranger?

Does my height fit the KBO Ranger?

Will my KBO Ranger arrive assembled?

Your bike will arrive 90% assembled. With the tools provided and a comprehensive installation video, you can build your KBO electric bike within 20mins.

Free Shipping

2-Year Warranty

14 Days Returns

Ranger Movement

As an avid cyclist owning 8 bikes, I never thought I would buy an Ebike. It’s worked out beautifully! My first trip back from the market with full containers, I had no idea they were on my bike! The Ranger is well built, a great design, easy assembly and a treat to ride! I’m very impressed and recommend this bike!

Took my grand babies out for a ride this evening. We all enjoyed it so much!

Other people’s set ups have inspired mine, maybe mine will help some other people.

best, electric, bikes, commuting, 2023

It’s mulch time again! Took 4 loads even with the new higher capacity trailer, but the garden is ready for spring!

Hauling a trailer and 4 kids! (shoes and helmets on, just for the picture)

I added a padded seat with low back support to the rear cargo. Used existing bolt locations to add flip down foot pegs, custom made a seat belt by adding a tarp grommet to a nylon strap to the back rest, and it turned out fantastic!

In Frame and Removable 48V 17.5Ah Lithium-ion Battery with Samsung/LG Cells

A KBO Bike battery life is one of its most significant advantages, rated for 900 complete charge cycles. With an 840Wh battery capacity, you can ride up to 60 miles on a single charge.

Powerful Sustained 750W Brushless Geared Hub Motor

Powered with a continuous 750W brushless geared hub motor, you won’t have to worry about carrying heavy loads and climbing steep uphills.

48V 3 Amp Quick Smart Charger

It takes just 5 hours to fully charge the battery, reducing the time between rides and keeping up with the quick pace of your riding needs.

Belt Drive

The single-speed belt drive provides a smooth, quiet, rugged, and clean system free from oil. And it provides great performance with low maintenance.

48V LED Headlight

To turn on the light, press and hold the UP button for 3 seconds. This function makes cycling at night safer and allows vehicles to notice you.

Integrated Brake Rear Light

The rear light is an integrated LED light that is powered by the battery pack. When you apply the brakes during a ride, the rear brake light illuminates immediately.

The Shimano 7-speed Derailleur

It’s designed for your riding experience and allows you to change the gears for adapting to different terrains on-demand.

Mechanical Disc Brakes

The front and rear 180 mm disc rotors give sufficient braking force even in the roughest of conditions.

Extra-large, Adaptable Rear Rack

The sturdy aluminum rear rack can support loads of up to 120 pounds. You can take a ride with your loved ones, transport your children from school, or transfer some heavy equipment.

Ergonomic Half Twist Throttle

When tired of pedaling, take a break and cruise. Gently twist the throttle on your right to accelerate.

Adjustable Saddle

This bike seat is a durable and comfortable saddle that decreases the impact of road bumps. You may adjust your posture by moving the saddle up and down as well as back and forth.

203.0 CST Tires

To prevent punctures, the tires are manufactured with high-quality materials that resist punctures caused by sharp objects. Wider than typical commuter tires, it provides a more stable and smooth ride on your commute.

Intelligent Installation Points

Fitted with an intelligent mounting bracket that can support up to 50 pounds. You can load it in any way you choose.

LCD Backlight Display

The display provides you with a range of information to help you keep track of your riding conditions. A charge indicator, a speedometer, an odometer, a trip odometer, a pedal assist level, and more features.

Full Fenders

Fenders on both the front and rear are complete with all of the necessary hardware. They’re incredibly resilient and keep you dry and clean from water and mud.

Center Stand

Built with rust-resistant, sturdy, and durable aluminum alloy.

  • 1. Total Length 69
  • 2. Handlebar Height 53
  • 3. Wheelbase 47
  • 4. Minimum Seat Height 27.5
  • 5. Maximum Seat Height 37.5
  • 6. Chain Stay Length 21.6
  • 7. Standover Height 15.7
  • 8. Reach 15.7
  • 9. Wheel Diameter 20
  • 10. Head Tube Length 7.1
  • 11. Handlebar Length 28.3
  • 12. Seat Tube Length (Frame Size) 15.6
  • 13. Minimum Pedal Height 4.7

The range delivered on a single battery is notably more than most other e-bikes at a comparable price and the ability to pick up a second battery is a nice touch.

The KBO Ranger is powered by an 840Wh LG battery and a 750W motor, allowing the rider to go up to 60 miles on a single charge. It also has smaller but broader tires for more stable riding over rugged terrain.

The Ranger is a flexible vehicle replacement that adapts to the demands of passengers, whether they’re carrying heavy loads or transporting their children to school.

Everything from the portable and lightweight frame to the generous payload capacity makes KBO RANGER a new and exciting choice for riders who want a little more at an affordable price. (The seat is a bit low to accommodate shorter riders)

Customer Reviews

Went together fairly easily. The instructions were a little hard to figure out for attaching the front tire. The allen wrench stripped the heads of a few of the bolts for attaching the fence (they were very hard to tighten). I made due using a couple of the spare bolts, but not the ones supplied for that. Would be nice to get some more bolts for that purpose. Due to the weather, I haven’t been able to ride the bike enough to check everything out.

We are having a blast riding to school and work. Can’t wait for longer summer excursions! All of the wind in your face but more stable for 2 and lets me decide if I’m working out or joy riding. The price was amazing for all the power and tech. Design is attractive. Fits in my apt. elevator… just fits!

The KBO Ranger has exceeded all expectations for a cargo bike. The fit, finish and performance are outstanding.

A bigger chain ring in the front or a higher gear in the back, please, otherwise this is a great hauler.

Very pleased in all respects

I’m really impressed. As an avid cyclist owning 8 bikes, I never thought I would buy an Ebike. Due to heavy traffic in Austin, I decided to get one for local movement and going to the market. I set mine up with two 12 gallon containers to go to the grocery store 1 mile away. It’s worked out beautifully! My first trip back from the market with full containers, I had no idea they were on my bike! The Ranger is well built, a great design, easy assembly and a treat to ride! I’m very impressed and recommend this bike!

What a great bike. I spent two years looking for a bike that would fit my needs. At 6’2” and 290lbs. yes fat!! I needed a well built bike. The Ranger has met all my expectations and more. Thanks KBO

First time on a bike in 50 years, was a little nervous at first but it all comes back to you, turning was a little scary but it is Great to be riding again and letting the wind blow in your hair. This is a great bike bc if you get tired peddling you can go electric and still enjoy being outside and enjoying nature If your thinking twice about getting this bike, just go for it and enjoy

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