Aventon Sinch vs Lectric’s XP Lite and XP 2.0. Aventon sinch electric bike

Aventon Sinch vs Lectric’s XP Lite and XP 2.0

We’re back again with another comparison article for you! Here we’re going to be looking at three different ebikes, comparing two folding ebikes from Lectric. the XP Lite and the XP 2.0. with our very own Aventon Sinch. These ebikes are two that a few of our customers have mentioned to us, pointing out the difference in price point and, as they do so, asking why there is such a difference. Such questions intrigued us too and we set out to investigate to see how our Sinch compared to these other ebikes. As before there are four sections.lenses if you will- that we’re going to use when completing a thorough comparison of these ebikes. The first time we look at these ebikes is going to be in a “Stats” section, where we’ll compare the information you may find on a tag hanging from each ebikes’ handlebars in a store. Next we’re going to compare the electrical elements of these ebikes, followed by a section discussing the mechanical parts of these ebikes. Finally we’re going to look them up and down, in a “Physical” section, and discover what else makes each of these ebikes unique, and discuss points relevant to their foldable nature.

Stats

How does the Aventon Sinch compare to these two Lectric ebikes when we draw up their “in-store” stats side-by-side.

The first thing that jumps out to people when looking at these lists is the price difference. The Sinch is double the price of the XP Lite and 700 more than the XP 2.0. Looking back up the list you’ll probably next notice that the motor on the Sinch and XP 2.0 are the same, but the XP Lite has a smaller motor. Next you may spot that the Sinch has a much larger battery than the two Lectric ebikes, with a larger range to go with it, a 40 mile average range compared to a 25 or 28 mile average range. You’d also notice here that the Sinch has a much greater range when just using the throttle, 30 miles compared to 15 or 20 miles. Besides this you may note that the Sinch has a full color screen, with app pairing capabilities, that the XP Lite is quite a bit lighter than the other two (hence its name) and that the Sinch and the XP 2.0 have 7 gears whilst the two XP ebikes have integrated lights. All-in-all, from just these facts it could be difficult to justify why the price for the Sinch is so much higher.

Electrical

The e element of these ebikes is, of course, one of the first things that everyone looks at when scrutinizing ebikes. So let’s see what these three ebikes offer up in the electrical department.

A 300W motor is good on flat ground however it can struggle with hillier terrain. In addition, heavier riders may find that a 300W motor does not have enough power to propel them to higher speeds. 500W is recommended by many as the smallest size motor to have, especially if you’re a bit of a speed chaser. In terms of the type of motor, brushless motors can attain a higher speed than their geared counterparts, which are a little quicker off the line than their non-geared counterparts. Not having as many moving parts, i.e. gears, means that the brushless motor in the Sinch will last a lot longer before it needs repair or replacing.

Simply, a larger battery means that you can travel further on a single charge. The battery in the Sinch is, respectively, 80% and 45% larger than the batteries in the other two ebikes, meaning that it has a superior range. This is excellent for those who want to travel longer distances without the worry of running out of jui ce. It is worth noting h ere that the literature for the Lectric ebikes talks about their range as an “up to” value, which is the same as many ebikes’ average range (around 40-45 miles). So, in reality, whilst numbers may read the same they mean something entirely different, and such numbers do vary greatly by the conditions the ebike is being ridden under. This battery also provides the Sinch with its superior throttle only range, which is 30 miles, respectively, 100% and 50% larger than the throttle only range of the Lectric ebikes.

Not much to analyze here! 5 levels of pedal assist for each of these ebikes puts them on a level playing field.

Both types of displays show you your battery’s charge level, your speed, an odometer, and your pedal assist level. They also have a trip odometer function that can show the motor power output. The Lectric ebikes are fitted with a simple backlit LCD display, while the Sinch’s Full Collor Display can also be paired with our mobile app, so you can download your trip details and share them, along with photos, with your friends and family.

The two Lectric ebikes include both front and rear integrated lights. The strength of these lights fit the budget price point of these ebikes and they might leave some wanting to purchase stronger headlights and taillights so that they can be comfortable riding during darker hours.

The faster you can charge your ebike the less time you have to spend sitting around waiting for it to charge. The Sinch comes with a fast charger, meaning that even though its battery is, respectively, 80% and 45% larger than those in these XP ebikes, it can be fully charged in less time.

The Sinch’s LCD screen has a built-in USB charger you can use to charge your phone from your ebike’s battery; The other two do not. This means that, with the Sinch, you’ll always have access to your phone’s functionalities whether that be to take beautiful photos, use your map, or make an emergency phone call.

A 300W motor is good on flat ground however it can struggle with hillier terrain. In addition, riders with heavier carry capacity may find that a 300W motor does not have enough power to propel them to higher speeds. 500W is recommended by many as the smallest size motor to have, especially if you’re a bit of a speed chaser.

Simply, a larger battery means that you can travel further on a single charge. The battery in the Sinch is, respectively, 80% and 45% larger than the batteries in the other two ebikes, meaning that it has a superior range. This is excellent for those who want to travel longer distances without the worry of running out of jui ce.

Not much to analyze here! 5 levels of pedal assist for each of these ebikes puts them on a level playing field.

While both types of displays show general data such as battery charge level, current speed, and pedal assist level, Lectric ebikes are fitted with a simple backlit LCD display. The Sinch’s Full Color Display can also be paired with our mobile app, so you can download your trip details and share them, along with photos, with your friends and family.

The two Lectric ebikes include both front and rear integrated lights. The strength of these lights fit the budget price point of these ebikes and they might leave some wanting to purchase stronger headlights and taillights so that they can be comfortable riding during darker hours.

The Sinch comes with a fast charger, meaning that even though its battery is, respectively, 80% and 45% larger than those in these XP ebikes, it can be fully charged in less time.

The Sinch’s LCD screen has a built-in USB charger you can use to charge your phone from your ebike’s battery; The other two do not. This means that, with the Sinch, you’ll always have access to your phone’s functionalities whether that be to take beautiful photos, use your map, or make an emergency phone call.

When we start looking at what is going on underneath the hood here we can see that there are some points where the Sinch earns practicality points. Such things like a much larger battery (meaning a greater range), a faster charger (50% faster!), and a USB port just make sense to many people. Although you may not have thought that if you were not putting these ebikes side-by-side.

Mechanical

First and foremost these machines are bikes, and these mechanical elements matter just as much as the electrical side of things. So how do these ebikes shape up next to each other on a mechanical level?

All of these ebikes are fitted with mechanical disc brakes, a necessity for ebikes that are heavier than regular bikes and can travel at the high speeds that these ebikes can. The Sinch has larger disc brakes than the Lectric ebikes and this means that the Sinch has more stopping power. Meaning it will stop quicker.

The Sinch and XP 2.0 have seven gears, meaning that riders have a greater flexibility than those with fewer gears, whether that be for going up hills or just running around on flat ground at their own pace.

A suspension fork is one of the elements of your ebike that makes your ride more comfortable. The longer the travel the less likely it will bottom out on rougher terrain, and with a 10% larger fork the Sinch wins here. The lockout feature of both allows you to lock the suspension fork for when you’re riding uphill, allowing all your power to reach your wheels rather than being lost in the compression of the fork.

All of these ebikes are fitted with mechanical disc brakes, a necessity for ebikes that are heavier than regular bikes and can travel at the high speeds that these ebikes can. The Sinch has larger disc brakes than the Lectric ebikes and this means that the Sinch has more stopping power.

The Sinch and XP 2.0 have seven gears, meaning that riders have a greater flexibility than those with fewer gears, whether that be for going up hills or just running around on flat ground at their own pace.

A suspension fork is one of the elements of your ebike that makes your ride more comfortable. The longer the travel the less likely it will bottom out on rougher terrain, and with a 10% larger fork, the Sinch wins here.

When analyzing the mechanical elements of these ebikes we find that the Sinch is a step above the XP 2.0 in two important elements, its braking ability and the size of its suspension fork. Both have the same amount of gearing, meaning that both provide the rider with a variety of gearing options for different situations. See this article for some tips for best practices around using gears.

Physical

Now that we’ve looked at the mechanical and electrical elements of these ebikes we’re going to sit back and take in the other, more intricate and often overlooked elements of these ebikes.

Both the Sinch and the XP 2.0 come in step-through models. Noticeably the Sinch has a 3.25 inch lower standover height than the XP 2.0, which means it is easier to mount for those with a lower level of mobility.

With a range of colors you can express yourself a lot more! The Sinch’s regular frame comes in Cloud Gray while the Sinch step-through comes in a beautiful Bonfire Red or Moss Green. The XP Lite comes in four colors: Arctic White, Lectric Blue, Midnight Black, or Sandstorm. The XP 2.0 comes in 1 color for the regular frame: Black; and 2 colors for the step-through model: White or Black.

While the throttle decision is more of a personal decision, having a thumb lever means that throttling your way around town is much easier! A simple tap of a lever is all it takes.

The XP 2.0 comes with pre-fitted fenders, while the Sinch and the XP Lite have their fenders sold separately. Fenders are handy because they stop you from getting mud and water flicked up onto your clothes while riding in wet or muddy conditions.

The Sinch has true fat tires while the Lectric ebikes offer two different sizes of thicker tires. Fat tires offer greater traction on loose surfaces such as sand, snow, and gravel. Far tires can cushion your ride more, acting more like suspension and providing a more comfortable ride. They also offer greater stability. Sinch’s puncture resistant fat tires also offer that extra peace of mind to any rider, no matter where they may be riding.

Racks help you to carry more gear with you, such as picnic stuff, camping gear, or even items for work if you’re using your foldable ebike to conquer the commute! Having a rack pre-fitted is a bonus, but that doesn’t mean a rear rack is totally out of question for Sinch and XP Lite!

Both the Sinch and the XP 2.0 come in step-through models. Noticeably the Sinch has a 3.25 inch lower standover height than the XP 2.0, which means it is easier to mount for those with a lower level of mobility.

With a range of colors you can express yourself a lot more! The Sinch’s regular frame comes in Cloud Gray while the Sinch step-through comes in a beautiful Bonfire Red or Moss Green. The XP Lite comes in four colors: Arctic White, Lectric Blue, Midnight Black, or Sandstorm. The XP 2.0 comes in 1 color for the regular frame: Black; and 2 colors for the step-through model: White or Black.

While the throttle decision is more of a personal decision, having a thumb lever means that throttling your way around town is much easier! A simple tap of a lever is all it takes.

The XP 2.0 comes with pre-fitted fenders, while the Sinch and the XP Lite have their fenders sold separately. Fenders are handy because they stop you from getting mud and water flicked up onto your clothes while riding in wet or muddy conditions.

The Sinch has true fat tires while the Lectric ebikes offer two different sizes of thicker tires. Fat tires offer greater traction on loose surfaces such as sand, snow, and gravel. They cushion rides making them more comfortable while also offering greater stability. Puncture resistant tires also offer that extra peace of mind to any rider, no matter where they may be riding.

Racks help you to carry more gear with you, such as picnic stuff, camping gear, or even items for work if you’re using your foldable ebike to conquer the commute! Having a rack pre-fitted is a bonus, but that doesn’t mean a rear rack is totally out of question for Sinch and XP Lite!

Reading through these points people may note that many of the differences between these ebikes are quite small. However, if we look at the finer details we find that some of them potentially show that a deeper level of thought went into the design and building of the Sinch folding ebike.

All in All

So, at a first glance these ebikes can seem rather similar. The first thing that stands out to most readers, after the price shock, is the much larger battery on the Sinch which gives you an average range that is 60% larger than that of the XP Lite and over 40% larger than that of the XP 2.0. On top of this average range gain, Sinch riders can also travel 15 miles further than XP Lite riders and 10 miles further than XP 2.0 riders when all are traveling using just throttle power! This extra range opens up so much more for riders and it is also worth noting that, although the Sinch’s battery is up to 80% larger than that of these Lectric ebikes, it takes the same amount of time to charge thanks to its fast charger. This all means that you get to be more flexible with choosing your route and get to spend longer enjoying your ebike! When we break down the mechanical side of these ebikes we, again, find that the Sinch hits on those practicality points which are so important to many riders. A gearless motor on the Sinch means that it won’t wear down anywhere near as quickly as the geared motors found on the Lectric ebikes. This ultimately means that this expensive part won’t need replacing anywhere near as quickly. Larger brakes give the Sinch superior stopping power (a necessity on ebikes that are heavier and faster than regular bikes) and the suspension fork fitted to the Sinch just gives it that extra 10% of space before it may bottom out and affect your comfort level. Finally, t he use of genuine fat tires on the Sinch means that it could be better suited to what these ebikes are designed for: running both on the pavement and off-road.

A Final Word: Which Would You Choose?

We’re here to run these three ebikes side-by-side so we can see how they actually stack up and what makes the difference in the price tag that we use to judge the value of something so heavily. Ultimately providing you with the right information to determine whether the price difference is justified. This is a statement that will have a different response depending on the individual you talk to and what their unique needs are for a folding ebike. What’s to be sure, no matter how focused you may be on style or appearance, we know which ebike we’d rather be caught riding when it comes to looks. Do you know which you’d rather be caught riding?

I love my Sinch Step-Through and think it’s worth every penny!! I researched the Lectric ebikes and knew they wouldn’t hold a candle to an Aventon Sinch. I use it as my daily transportation because my son rides my Aventure now. I love Aventon ebikes.

I ordered a Sinch step over last Tuesday and I’m so excited for it to get here. You guys don’t have enough videos on YouTube for the step over. I love the drone shots so that you can capture the whole bike/rider experience rather than the first person look over the handlebars…you can’t even see the bike! I grew up with motorcycles so I could not resist getting the step over even though I’m 73 and may some day wish I had gotten the step through. It is such a sharp look I just wouldn’t have been happy unless I got the step over. I’m sure I will love it. Best of luck I love the way you guys operate. You change little components on your bikes as you see fit to better it all the time. I appreciate that I know everyone else must too.

With two knee replacements this Sinch step-thru is easy to ride. So far the quality is outstanding. The power is more than adequate.

I LOVE my White Sinch! The step over is the most beautiful bike ever made. I have also made full use of it’s long range. I have had it almost a year now, and have had many fun adventures on it.

Aventon Sinch.2 Review: Subtle Changes make for a Superior Step-Through

The Sinch.2 is the second iteration of Aventon’s slick-looking folding, fat tire ebike with a price tag of 1,799. It retains the user-friendly, step-through design of its predecessor, the Sinch Step-through, as well as a bunch of notable improvements. The latest model includes integrated front and rear lights, metal fenders, and a rear rack. And although the replacement of the Shimano Acera derailleur with Aventon’s own brand derailleur is a slight downgrade, it is great to find an eight-speed shifter and torque sensor.

Read on for our written review or check out our in-depth Aventon Sinch.2 video review below.

Aventon Sinch.2 Battery, Range and Display

The 14AH, 48V battery is the same size as the first Sinch Step-through and is seamlessly stowed at the top of the frame, making it super accessible. And, importantly, the battery is TUV Rheinland North America cTUVus certified in accordance with UL 2849. UL 2849 by definition is the standard for electrical systems for ebikes, which provides fire safety certification by examining the electrical drive train, battery, and charger system combinations in e-bikes.

Aventon promises a 55-mile range on flat ground with ‘Eco’ level of pedal assist (160 lb rider on flat terrain); an improvement from the 40 range of the earlier Sinch Step-through. This is of course due to the efficiency gains of the torque sensor. Throttle only range on the Sinch.2 is 22 Miles.

The latest model has dropped from five levels of pedal assist to four (Eco, Tour, Sport and Turbo) and it retains its Class 2 designation with a top speed of 20mph. Unlike other Aventon ebikes, the Sinch.2 can not be overridden for Class 3 speeds up to 28 mph.

Click for larger view

Motor Power and Torque Sensor

The motor offers 500 watts sustained and 750 watts at peak. We were impressed with the performance up our large hill climb test and the motor packs a bigger punch than many other Aventon ebikes. A thumb throttle has been relocated to the right side, which now feels a little crowded with the two shifter levers in the same place.

But the transition to a torque sensor offers more natural control over human and motor effort and is certainly a rare feature for ebikes in the sub 2000 market. Simply put, the motor amplifies the effort the rider is putting in (varying on pedal assist level), instead of basic cadence sensors which engage the motor as long as the pedals are moving.

A sizable LCD color display clearly presents battery life, speed, and pedal assist mode. Controls on the left now include turn signal buttons – via the rear lights – which also enable access to trip information over on the display. Connectivity with the Aventon app is a nice feature too and the display unit even includes a hidden USB port for phone charging.

Sinch.2 Components Added and Altered

It would have been great to see the rear Tektro mechanical disc brakes replaced by a hydraulic set and to retain the Shimano shifter and derailleur, although the Aventon branded components were fine in our testing. Gears are a 12-32 teeth cassette at the rear and a 48-tooth double-sided front chainring.

The 20″x4″ Chao Yang tires have an attractive brown sidewall and more of a street tread, less useful for rough terrain, but fine for a crushed-gravel path. The RST front suspension fork performs really well and includes a pre-load on the left and lock-out on the right. And the newly integrated lights might look small, but work well, especially as brake and indicator lights at the back. The turn signals are timed and turn off automatically in about 10 seconds.

It’s also super useful to have a rack included – for weight bearing up to 55 lbs (25kg) – as well as metal fenders and neatly wrapped cables and the tidy cable management system we’ve come to expect from Aventon. Folding pedals, easily clear the kickstand behind and an extra rest underneath the Sinch.2 keeps the folded ebike upright. Props to Aventon for cutting their carbon footprint with predominantly cardboard and twine packaging.

Check out Aventon’s website for a full list of components.

Conclusion

Aventon’s Sinch.2 is a well-designed and functional folding ebike, kitted out with a robust range of features to make for a comfortable and safe ride. The newly included accessories – such as lights, rack, and fenders – are about right for an ebike at this price point and the torque sensor is a premium addition. It’s also worth noting that Aventon currently boasts the largest ebike dealer network, with some 1,000 local bike shops at the time of writing.

Be sure to check out all of our Aventon reviews to learn about other offerings.

AVENTON ELECTRIC: SINCH.2 ST. Electric Folding Bike

Buy this bike from Bike Attack Playa Vista and get a second battery at 200 off. We provide the link to get the discounted battery directly from the maker after you purchased the bike from us. Offer is valid for a limited time.

AT BIKE ATTACK Playa Vista: AVENTON FOLDING BIKE WITH RAD POWER AND SPEED

The Aventon Sinch.2 ST at Bike Attack Playa Vista is the perfect fit for any kind of electric bike ride! Simply unfold the ebike, then hit the streets or go off-road. With the addition of a torque sensor and all-new turn signal functionality there’s nowhere this bike can’t go.

Sinch.2 comes in one size and fits most adults.

TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

Sinch.2 ships as a Class II ebike, with pedal assist and throttle. Sinch.2 will also operate with the throttle unplugged and removed, should you want to ride in an area where throttles are prohibited.

Aventon ebikes are built to the IPX4 water-resistant standard. IPX4 means that your bike is resistant to water splashes from any direction. This means it’s OK to ride your ebike in light rain.

It won’t be harmed by spray from a wet road or raindrops. Your ebike is not intended to be exposed to prolonged rain or submerged or subjected to a pressurized spray.

Don’t use a pressure washer or sprayer to clean your ebike. Using PAS Eco throughout flat terrain with a rider weight of 160 lbs.

Bike Attack Playa Vista provides assembly (if bought locally from us) and warranty service.

A big difference to sole online dealers who do not help assembling your bike.

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We are also there for our local customers when they need help with repairs, service and warranty and offer a FREE 30 day brake and adjustment.

Perfect for those with limited storage space, the Sinch is foldable and easily stored in your closet, under your desk, or in your RV. Regardless of where you ride and where you travel, the possibilities are endless with the Sinch ST.

Sinch E-Bike Is Like A Dirtbike That Fits In Your Closet

Just before the holidays, we got a cool little e-bike from Aventon to review. I’ve got a shed full of e-bikes, and several that don’t fit in the shed, but this one was unique in that I have room for it anyway. Why? Because it folds down into a fairly small size when I’m not riding it. But unlike many folding bicycles, this one feels almost like a normal bike when it’s folded out and ready to go.

The Delivery Experience

Like most e-bikes, the Sinch came in a box and came directly to my door. It wasn’t nearly as big of a box as the full-size Rad or Trek e-bikes I’ve reviewed, but it was still fairly big and heavy. If you order one, be sure to have a friend or family member around to help bring it in. But, despite being a heavy box like all e-bikes, this one required almost zero assembly. By design, it folds down into a small size, so you just need to take off the protective packaging and do some very minor assembly.

Looking at the parts the bike comes with, it’s comparable to what you’d get on a non-electric bike from a local bike shop in the 800-1000 range, so the quality is there. The e-bike doesn’t come with top-of-the-line EV parts (that would make this bike cost around 3000-4000), but they’re also not anywhere near bottom of the barrel either. For 1699, you’re getting your money’s worth for sure, parts wise.

Unfortunately, things do go wrong in shipping. One of the plastic guards for the running gear came loose, and allowed the wheel to move around in the box. This bent one of the parts in the rear derailleur, crippling the bike. But Aventon had me covered. The company found me a local bike shop they already work with, arranged for me to drop it off, and it got repaired just like new. No company can guarantee nothing bad will happen, but what sets the good ones apart from the bad ones is how they take care of you.

So, the quality and the customer service are both there.

The Small Bike That Feels Like A Big One

The folded Sinch e-bike next to a Radrover ST. It’s not tiny, and it won’t fit in a suitcase, but it rides a lot better than the bikes that fold truly tiny. Photo credit: Jennifer Sensiba.

Making things smaller is almost always a compromise. Cars get less roomy as they get smaller, but tend to be more efficient. Little concealed carry pistols hurt your hand when you shoot them, and aren’t as accurate as their bigger cousins. A small house or apartment saves on rent or mortgage payments, but you don’t have room for as many people or things. A small phone fits in a or purse easier, but doesn’t have the screen room that a tablet does.

In all of these situations, we’re always trying to find ways around the inevitable trade-offs. People in the suburbs buy a shed or two for more room, while people in dense cities rent a storage locker somewhere. Just a few days ago, Samsung revealed a smartphone that folds out on two sets of hinges to become as big as a tablet, and another tablet that becomes almost as big as a small TV.

Bikes are a similar struggle. The best fat-tire e-bikes are very comfortable to ride, can handle some rough terrain and sand, and feel very stable, but they’re hard for many people to fit in an apartment. Even if you have plenty of room at home, trying to ride an e-bike to the office means you need to have room for it there, too.

To get around this, bike manufacturers started offering quick-release wheels for easier storage and transport. This helps a LOT. Then, we started seeing all sorts of folding bikes, which helps in some situations. But, in many cases, too much was lost in translation, and you end up with an e-bike that looks like something a clown would ride and handles like a kick scooter. Those bikes are easy to stash somewhere, but too much of the riding experience gets lost.

This is where the Sinch really shines. It strikes a decent balance between compactness when folded and rideability/capability. Once you’ve folded the handlebars up, closed the tube hinge, and folded the pedals out, you’ve got a bike that still feels stable and rides well.

aventon, sinch, lectric, lite, electric

You won’t be able to fit this in a suitcase or a small car’s trunk, but it’ll fit in most closets and easily in the back of a hatchback or SUV. It also won’t take a bunch of space up in an office. It’s still pretty heavy folded up, but you can roll it around kind of like a backwards wheelbarrow, so it’s not terrible to move short distances (for a longer walk, you’d want to leave it unfolded if possible, and walk it like a normal bike).

aventon, sinch, lectric, lite, electric

How It Rides As A Bike As An E-Bike

As with all new e-bikes I review, I first rode it for a few without any power assist to see how it was as a normal bicycle. Like most e-bikes, it’s heavy, but has gearing low enough to get out of its own way without killing your leg muscles. It has a 7-speed rear derailleur, so there’s plenty of gearing for getting up to 20-25 MPH if your legs are good for it. Even around 20 MPH on a sprint, it still feels stable.

If you were going to regularly use the bike as a bike on pavement, you’d probably want to max out tire inflation to reduce rolling resistance and make for an easier ride. Or, if you’re going to regularly encounter sand, cut the inflation back a bit to allow for more grip as needed.

Next, I put the bike in PAS (Pedal assist) 1, the lowest setting. The first thing I noticed is that there’s a slight delay and the power tapers in over half a second or so. This is actually a good thing, as it’ll keep you from destroying the gears in the hub motor assembly. Once the power does kick in, PAS level 1 is unusually powerful at low speeds compared to my other e-bikes, so having that taper was definitely important.

The high surge of power does ease off after a couple of seconds, so the bike doesn’t run away from you. In PAS 1, you max out at around 10-12 MPH assisted. Turning up to higher PAS levels raises the power it gives as well as the top speed possible with mostly assist power. PAS 5 can definitely push most any rider up to the advertised 20 MPH top speed.

Like pedal assist, the throttle seems to have a slight delay and taper programmed in. Once again, this keeps the bike from damaging itself by stressing the gears out too much (a repair you definitely want to avoid). On throttle, it will push nearly any rider up to the advertised top speed, no problem.

My only complaint about the throttle is that it’s a thumb throttle and not a twist throttle. On smooth pavement, the thumb throttle isn’t a problem at all, as your thumb can basically stay in the same spot for consistent power to the rear wheel. If you hit bumps, your thumb does tend to move up and down a bit, making for uneven power that can make the bumpy parts of a ride feel rougher. At worst, you can get a feedback loop where the bumps cause you to bump the throttle, which makes you feel the bumps more, which makes the throttle get agitated more and so on. When this does happen, it’s best to just release the throttle for a second to let things even out, and use the pedal assist instead if you need some power to get past the bumps.

When folded, it has a little stand to set the bike on and keep the chain off the ground. This makes it easier to hide in a closet or behind a desk at work. Photo credit: Jennifer Sensiba.

Minor Off-Road Performance

This doesn’t seem like the kind of e-bike that you’d want to take on the hardest trails, but I did take it on some irrigation ditches and a particularly awful stretch of railroad easement near my house to test its abilities on sand, bumps, and even downed branches/yard waste. Nothing stopped it.

Loose dirt and even some mud from recent rains never made it slip, even at 20 MPH on full throttle. Small rocks, branches, yard waste someone threw out next to the railroad track, and even bits of wood and trash didn’t bother it. It could even climb some minor grades with loose dirt and mud on pedal assist or throttle without slipping around.

When running at around 15 MPH, I still had some reserve power and acceleration available to push through tough sections of loose material or debris before slowing down a bit to get that reserve of available power back. Doing this, it felt like a little dirt bike, even if 15-20 is slow by dirt bike standards. Just having that surge of power on throttle or pedal assist ready to go made it feel like it was something more than just a bicycle.

Final Thoughts

I’m a lot more impressed with this e-bike than I thought I was going to be. I figured that a doofy folding e-bike would have made a lot more compromises, but the Sinch strikes a very good balance that gives you not just something faster than walking, but also leaves some room for fun and off-pavement work.

aventon, sinch, lectric, lite, electric

Its ability to give you a surge of power when needed, but without risk to the drivetrain, makes it like a little dirtbike that you can fold up and put away. That alone makes it worth considering.

This article is supported by Aventon. All photos credit: Jennifer Sensiba.

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Former Tesla Battery Expert Leading Lyten Into New Lithium-Sulfur Battery Era — Podcast:

I don’t like paywalls. You don’t like paywalls. Who likes paywalls? Here at CleanTechnica, we implemented a limited paywall for a while, but it always felt wrong — and it was always tough to decide what we should put behind there. In theory, your most exclusive and best content goes behind a paywall. But then fewer people read it! We just don’t like paywalls, and so we’ve decided to ditch ours. Unfortunately, the media business is still a tough, cut-throat business with tiny margins. It’s a never-ending Olympic challenge to stay above water or even perhaps — gasp — grow. So.

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