2022 Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 | First Ride Review. Honda e dirt bike

22 Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 | First Ride Review

Do you remember the pure joy of your first motorcycle ride? If you started young, you probably have magical memories of ripping around your neighborhood on a Honda Mini Trail, a Rupp Dart Cycle, or some other minibike.

Or if you had trails or a track nearby, maybe you rode a little dirtbike like a Yamaha PW50 or Honda Z50R.

If you were lucky, you got a minibike for your birthday or Christmas. If you weren’t, you nagged your parents incessantly to buy one or befriended the kid down the street who had one.

Childhood isn’t as carefree as it used to be, and neighbors aren’t as forgiving of noise. Minibikes and peewee dirtbikes are still sold at local dealerships and outdoor retailers, but there are fewer places to ride them – and fewer parents willing to let their kids do so.

Stepping Stones

My buddy Paul Beck and I met on monthly adventure rides hosted by our local BMW dealership. His wife, Allison, became friends with my wife, Carrie, and in 2015, soon after Paul and Allison had their first child, August, they bought a house down the street from us.

Carrie and I don’t have kids of our own, and we enjoy being “aunt and uncle” to August and his younger brother, Wolfgang. When August was 18 months old, we got him a bright-red Strider balance bike and a matching stars-and-stripes helmet for Christmas.

Since he started so young, it took August a while to get the hang of the Strider. He mostly paddle-walked it, and he wasn’t a fan of the helmet. But before we knew it, he was zipping around with his feet up on the footrests, coasting and balancing on two wheels with an ear-to-ear grin on his face.

From the Strider he graduated to a BMX bike, which he picked up quickly.

When the Greenger x Honda CRF-E2 electric dirtbike was announced back in March, I knew it would be perfect for August.

Knobby Tires but No Noise

Designed and manufactured by Greenger Powersports, the CRF-E2 is an officially licensed product of American Honda and only available through Honda powersports dealers (MSRP is 2,950). The electric equivalent of a 50cc dirtbike, it’s powered by a 48-volt brushless DC electric motor that produces up to 3.4 HP and 18.4 lb-ft of torque and has two power modes.

With a full charge, the CRF-E2’s lithium-ion battery lasts up to two hours. Using a 110V outlet, the battery can be fully charged in four hours – or 2.5 hours with the optional quick-charge system (250). It also has a swappable battery, and a spare battery costs 1,000.

For American Honda to license something made by another company, the build quality and reliability had to meet exacting standards. The CRF-E2 has a twin-spar aluminum frame, a tapered aluminum handlebar, front and rear hydraulic disc brakes with petal-style rotors, adjustable aluminum brake hand levers, and 12-inch spoked aluminum rims with Kenda Millville K771 knobby tires.

Suspension is handled by a 33mm telescopic fork with 3.9 inches of travel and a rear monoshock with 3.8 inches of travel and adjustable preload and rebound. The shock’s top mounting bolt has two positions that alter the seat height from 24.8 to 25.5 inches. The CRF-E2 accommodates riders up to 99 lb.

August’s First Ride

To get August ready for his first ride, Fly Racing sent us a full set of youth dirtbike gear: a Formula CP Rush helmet with Adaptive Impact System, Zone goggles, Kinetic Wave jersey and pants, F-16 gloves, Maverik motocross boots, and a Barricade jersey and flex knee guards. August said he felt like a superhero when he put everything on.

His first ride was on a Thursday afternoon in a little park in the back of our neighborhood. With no transmission, the CRF-E2 has simple twist-and-go operation. His dad and I gave him pointers on how to gradually roll on the power, to squeeze rather than grab the brakes, and to give the nearby trees plenty of space.

August picked it up in no time. He turned lap after lap after lap, and then he did figure-8s. He practiced stopping and starting. He tumbled a couple times when coming to a stop on uneven ground, but he got back up and kept going.

One of the most appealing aspects of the CRF-E2 is its nearly silent operation. Residents and dog walkers in our suburban neighborhood didn’t notice or didn’t care that a kid was having fun on a dirtbike within eyesight.

On one lap, August yelled to Wolfgang, “This is my favorite motorcycle ever!” Wolfgang yelled back, “It’s my favorite too!” (Wolfgang still needs more Strider practice.)

Two hours later, Carrie and I went home for dinner, and August was still riding. Paul said he would stay out there with his son until it got dark or the battery ran out.

Hitting the Dirt

After morning and afternoon practice sessions in the park, it was time to hit the dirt. Paul and I lifted the 106-lb CRF-E2 into the bed of his Ford F-150, ratchet-strapped it in place, and drove with August up to the Hungry Valley OHV area in Gorman, California.

August felt confident riding on the grass in our neighborhood park because it provided good traction, but he struggled with the loose sand and gravel of the OHV park’s staging area. With coaching help from photographer Kevin Wing, we worked our way up gradually, having August ride back and forth in straight lines from Paul to me, practicing smooth starts and stops.

After 20 minutes or so, we took a break in the shade. It was a hot day, and August wasn’t accustomed to the heat in full riding gear. A cold, wet towel, some iced-down Gatorade, and a bag of peanut MMs revived him.

Next, we moved to a mini track limited to bikes 90cc or smaller. Luckily, we had it to ourselves, and August started turning laps. He struggled with some of the bermed turns that had deep sand and rocks at the bottom. He fell down a lot, and each time Paul or I helped pick up the bike and provided some coaching and encouragement.

August no doubt felt the pressure of having three adults watching him, but he never gave up. Every time he toppled over, he’d jump up and say, “I’m okay!” and try again.

It was amazing to see how quickly August progressed. Intuitively, he started to learn throttle control, body position, and line selection, avoiding some of the larger rocks and tricky spots.

Best of all, he had fun. When he got tired and started making mistakes, we’d take a break in the shade. But he was always eager to go again. And Paul was a proud papa.

After a few hours of alternating between riding sessions and breaks, August’s enthusiasm outstripped his energy. He wanted to keep riding, but he kept dropping the bike because he was too exhausted.

Even after all that riding, the battery level had only dropped by one bar out of five. Most kids will run out of gas before the CRF-E2 runs out of charge.

2022, greenger, honda, crf-e2, first

August was bummed when we loaded the CRF-E2 back in the truck, but he was passed out asleep before we left the OHV park.

When we got home, Paul and I had a couple beers while we supervised August washing down the bike, cleaning his gear, and putting everything away so it would be ready for his next ride. Learning good habits is part of growing up.

Paul plans to buy the CRF-E2 so August can keep riding, and in a year or two, Wolfgang will inherit his brother’s gear and pick up the baton.

Welcome to the moto tribe, August. You have a lifetime of fun ahead of you.

Surron X Bike (Black Edition)

The latest most updated version of the Sur Ron X Bike. Save up to 500 with free shipping for our lowest price of the year. Free shipping is a limited time offer.

Also this bike is offered with the 38ah battery upgrade. The upgraded battery will give you a few extra miles of range and uses the Samsung 35E cell instead of the standard Panasonic PF cell.

This has the X-controller with Regen breaking and quieter operation. 80amps of power. Programming instructions can be found (here)

The Surron X bike is the same as the original Sur-Ron Light Bee with the added above features. The most significant upgrade is its state of the art sine wave controller which makes it quieter and more powerful with much smoother throttle response.

( Click Here for a Close Up)

Incredible Battery

On any electric bike, you should take a good look at the battery since it is by far the most expensive part of the bike. Lightweight power dense batteries are not cheap, and if they are cheap they are probably not safe or reliable. The Sur-Ron has a gigantic 60v 32ah pack which is 2000 watt hours. To give you an idea how much range to expect it has 4x the capacity as most of today’s production bikes.

The battery consists of panasonic PF cells (or Samsung 35e for the 38ah version) cells i in a well built case that slides in and out of bike, a microprocessor based battery management system and extra goodness.

Awesome Engineering

Every detail of this bike is thought out and no expense is spared when needed to make a reliable high performance off road machine.

It has one of the best constructed battery packs ever offered in a small EV.

The Surron is designed for serious off road riding and we have done tests with many drops that confirm the suspension system on the Sur Ron is rock solid.

The Surron comes with an 8 inch travel for both front and rear suspension.

Upgrades Available

Surron Gates Belt Kit Upgrade is now available installed by our shop (See on This Upgrade), and pairs great with the Moto Kit in mind, but still works without.

Super Moto Kit Swap is 17 Smooth Tire install upgrade that is ideal for riding on smoother terrain. Ideal for Moto racing, this kit lowers your Sur-Ron a little due to the smaller size, but don’t worry you’ll have the same top end speed. If you want both sets of wheels, purchase a Separate Moto Kit Here. If you want both drivetrains, the belt kit is available here and the stock drivetrain is available here.

We at Luna take our flagship products serious and we have many upgrades for this bike including a Super Moto Tire upgrade, Sprocket upgrades, and

The Best Electric Dirt Bikes of 2023

Remarkably, only one of them went for the Dirt-E joke.

The motoring world is going electric. And it’s not just fancy, 1,000-horsepower, six-figure electric trucks. Electric motorcycle options have been increasing over the past few years. And even the relatively humble and underpowered dirt bike segment now offers a proliferation of emissions-free options — and we’re here to help you separate the battery-powered wheat from the chaff.

Why You Should Get an Electric Dirt Bike

Helps Save the Planet: Smaller motorcycles are far from the most fuel-thirsty vehicles. But electric dirt bikes still reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and every little bit helps.

Less Maintenance: Electric motors require far fewer moving parts. That means more time riding and less time (and money) replacing parts. You also don’t need to buy things like oil.

Less Noise: Electric dirt bikes do make some noise, but they make less than internal-combustion dirt bikes — noise that can diminish the enjoyment of being in nature for riders and those nearby.

Accessible to New Riders: Like electric cars, electric dirt bikes do not need a manual transmission. This may disappoint some riders looking for a traditional feel. But it’s also way easier to manage while off-road.

Torque: Electric dirt bikes tend to have a lot of torque, and it comes on instantly. This helps them accelerate rapidly and feel quick in everyday riding.

What to Look For

Street Legality: Like combustion dirt bikes, many of them will not be street-legal. And you may live in a municipality that will confiscate and crush them if you try to use them for that — electric or not. There are dual-sport electric dirt bikes (lighter than adventure motorcycles), which can also be used as commuter bikes. But make sure you clarify that before buying.

Battery Range: Range is a significant drawback to any electric vehicle. You want to ensure you have enough range to do the amount of riding you’re planning. expensive electric dirt bikes will have range that can exceed what most drives can handle physically. But that may be costly.

Battery Charging: A nother important factor beyond range is how long it takes to charge the battery. Shorter is better. Manufacturers may offer accessories that improve charging speed. Some dirt bikes can instantly swap in a newly charged battery and return to the trail.

How We Tested

Gear Patrol writers and editors are continually testing the best electric dirt bikes on a variety of terrains to update this guide looking at features like comfort, ease of use and riding characteristics. Our testers have spent time riding the Zero XF and the Cake Kalk INK so far; however, we’ll be updating this guide as we continue to test more models.

Zero’s FX isn’t a one-trick pony; it’s good at a little bit of everything. It’s fast but torque-heavy up front. For comparison, it’s nimble but still about 50 pounds heavier than KTM’s 350EXC-F. And it’s quiet, which anyone who’s ridden a dual sport before knows has distinct advantages and downsides. (Upsides include not disturbing nature as you ride through and saving your eardrums; cons include being unable to announce yourself to other riders on the trail or cars on the street.)

The FX’s ride is very smooth — from city streets to rutted-out trails and even completely off-road in the ungroomed wild. The tires grip well on city streets, even after a light rain. The FX can reach a top speed of 85, but I rarely found myself pushing it above 65 — this is a great cruising bike built for the trails as much as it is for the road. The acceleration feels torque-y until you get the hang of the feeling; I’d recommend starting in Eco until you get a feel for how the bike handles, experienced rider or not.

The profile is lean and mean, just as advertised. Your tester is 5’4” and weigh 110 pounds, and she could handle and maneuver this bike with relative ease, although she did make sure to get comfortable on the bike on uncrowded trails before taking it to the streets. Zero says the charging time is 1.3 hours, but I found it to be much longer than that. the bike was delivered to me with an 80 percent charge, and it took more than two hours to get it full. The range is 91 miles which is a solid day’s ride, but unless you have the means to give the bike a good overnight charge, you’ll be SOL the next day. And that 91-mile range is in the city — if you’re riding on the highway at 70 mph without starting and stopping, it drops to 39 miles per charge.

2022, greenger, honda, crf-e2, first

We’ve been fans of Swedish manufacturer Cake — and Stefan Ytterborn’s helmet/eyewear/apparel brand, POC — for years. Founded in 2016, Cake has consistently put out smooth, innovative electric bikes that offer both gorgeous looks and purpose-built function.

The Kalk class of offroaders, however, is much more about play than work. The street-legal Kalk INK picks up quick thanks to 252Nm of electric torque, while reliable suspension (200mm of travel) and beefy dual-sport motorcycle tires help you keep the shiny side up from the road to the trails.

  • Removable battery charges from 0 to 80 percent in two hours, 0 to 100 percent in three
  • Three ride modes and three braking modes adapt to your style and environment
  • Not exactly the cushiest seat on the planet (or this page)
  • You must come to a full stop to adjust ride and braking modes

The Best Electric Dirt Bikes of 2023

Remarkably, only one of them went for the Dirt-E joke.

The motoring world is going electric. And it’s not just fancy, 1,000-horsepower, six-figure electric trucks. Electric motorcycle options have been increasing over the past few years. And even the relatively humble and underpowered dirt bike segment now offers a proliferation of emissions-free options — and we’re here to help you separate the battery-powered wheat from the chaff.

Why You Should Get an Electric Dirt Bike

Helps Save the Planet: Smaller motorcycles are far from the most fuel-thirsty vehicles. But electric dirt bikes still reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and every little bit helps.

Less Maintenance: Electric motors require far fewer moving parts. That means more time riding and less time (and money) replacing parts. You also don’t need to buy things like oil.

Less Noise: Electric dirt bikes do make some noise, but they make less than internal-combustion dirt bikes — noise that can diminish the enjoyment of being in nature for riders and those nearby.

Accessible to New Riders: Like electric cars, electric dirt bikes do not need a manual transmission. This may disappoint some riders looking for a traditional feel. But it’s also way easier to manage while off-road.

Torque: Electric dirt bikes tend to have a lot of torque, and it comes on instantly. This helps them accelerate rapidly and feel quick in everyday riding.

What to Look For

Street Legality: Like combustion dirt bikes, many of them will not be street-legal. And you may live in a municipality that will confiscate and crush them if you try to use them for that — electric or not. There are dual-sport electric dirt bikes (lighter than adventure motorcycles), which can also be used as commuter bikes. But make sure you clarify that before buying.

Battery Range: Range is a significant drawback to any electric vehicle. You want to ensure you have enough range to do the amount of riding you’re planning. expensive electric dirt bikes will have range that can exceed what most drives can handle physically. But that may be costly.

Battery Charging: A nother important factor beyond range is how long it takes to charge the battery. Shorter is better. Manufacturers may offer accessories that improve charging speed. Some dirt bikes can instantly swap in a newly charged battery and return to the trail.

How We Tested

Gear Patrol writers and editors are continually testing the best electric dirt bikes on a variety of terrains to update this guide looking at features like comfort, ease of use and riding characteristics. Our testers have spent time riding the Zero XF and the Cake Kalk INK so far; however, we’ll be updating this guide as we continue to test more models.

Zero’s FX isn’t a one-trick pony; it’s good at a little bit of everything. It’s fast but torque-heavy up front. For comparison, it’s nimble but still about 50 pounds heavier than KTM’s 350EXC-F. And it’s quiet, which anyone who’s ridden a dual sport before knows has distinct advantages and downsides. (Upsides include not disturbing nature as you ride through and saving your eardrums; cons include being unable to announce yourself to other riders on the trail or cars on the street.)

The FX’s ride is very smooth — from city streets to rutted-out trails and even completely off-road in the ungroomed wild. The tires grip well on city streets, even after a light rain. The FX can reach a top speed of 85, but I rarely found myself pushing it above 65 — this is a great cruising bike built for the trails as much as it is for the road. The acceleration feels torque-y until you get the hang of the feeling; I’d recommend starting in Eco until you get a feel for how the bike handles, experienced rider or not.

2022, greenger, honda, crf-e2, first

The profile is lean and mean, just as advertised. Your tester is 5’4” and weigh 110 pounds, and she could handle and maneuver this bike with relative ease, although she did make sure to get comfortable on the bike on uncrowded trails before taking it to the streets. Zero says the charging time is 1.3 hours, but I found it to be much longer than that. the bike was delivered to me with an 80 percent charge, and it took more than two hours to get it full. The range is 91 miles which is a solid day’s ride, but unless you have the means to give the bike a good overnight charge, you’ll be SOL the next day. And that 91-mile range is in the city — if you’re riding on the highway at 70 mph without starting and stopping, it drops to 39 miles per charge.

We’ve been fans of Swedish manufacturer Cake — and Stefan Ytterborn’s helmet/eyewear/apparel brand, POC — for years. Founded in 2016, Cake has consistently put out smooth, innovative electric bikes that offer both gorgeous looks and purpose-built function.

The Kalk class of offroaders, however, is much more about play than work. The street-legal Kalk INK picks up quick thanks to 252Nm of electric torque, while reliable suspension (200mm of travel) and beefy dual-sport motorcycle tires help you keep the shiny side up from the road to the trails.

  • Removable battery charges from 0 to 80 percent in two hours, 0 to 100 percent in three
  • Three ride modes and three braking modes adapt to your style and environment
  • Not exactly the cushiest seat on the planet (or this page)
  • You must come to a full stop to adjust ride and braking modes

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